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Timeerror

Cross wind Landing

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Hi,Maybe this is a silly question, but I am not a profi.How do you perform crosswind landings (manual). I tried to land in LOWI (Innsbruck) on runway 08 in a crosswind situation. Wind speed was 20 from the left. Touchdown was "ok" but the roll out was not good. I was not able to stay in the middle of the runway. So my question is:Is this a limitation of FSX?What are your techniques for cross wind landings

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First, on your approach, you want to "crab" your aircraft into the wind direction. That is, use rudder to to turn your aircrafts nose into the direction of wind while using ailerons to maintain a straight track to the runway. Usually come out of crap and straigten nose above runway threshold. The rollout is all done by the rudder, not your nosewheel steering. This is a difficult task and completely normal to mess up your first few times.


Ken Connors

PMDG_ngx_T7_sig.jpg

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The above is sorta correct, but it mixes up 'crab' and 'slip' a bit. To crab the plane you simply point the nose into the wind to offset any drift, keep the wings level, and when over the threshhold, 'kick out the crab', and land normally. If the wind is really strong, keep the upwind wing low as you toruchdown.To 'slip' the plane, you use cross control's, that is using rudder to offset the wind and opposite aileron to keep the plane aligned with the runway. As you touchdown, again release the controls to land level, with possibly a slight wing low into the wind.In either case, once down, roll out normally and if the wind is very strong, keep the ailerons deflected into the wind and steer using rudder/nosewheel and even differential thrust if necessary.


Jay

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Ok,thank you for your quick answersI think that I did this slipping/crabbing etc correct and the rollout seems do be more difficult than I thought.Is differential thrust "realistic".Whats about diffential braking?

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No Jay, my post is 100% correct, I know everything and I've been flying the RW NG's since they rolled out, so I'm right - 100% ;)


Ken Connors

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No Jay, my post is 100% correct, I know everything and I've been flying the RW NG's since they rolled out, so I'm right - 100% ;)
You're flying the 737 RW and don't know the difference between crabbing and slipping?! blink.png

Jordan Forrest

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More to the point why is his training dept teaching him to use the rudder to point the nose into the wind?! It is not a cessna. You do not touch the rudder until you decrab during the flare or during an engine out. Other then that the rudder is a foot rest.Is your company really teaching you to fly a large transport aircraft like that during a crosswind approach?


Rob Prest

 

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Yes, well lets ignore individuals who claim to be real world pilots.It's pretty simple."Bank" using "ailerons" as much as is required in the direction of the wind. The aircrafts heading of course, due to the crosswind, is the runway heading.If you are heading toward the runway in a crosswind, this will be the case anyway, you will be crabbed. Just as you will be naturally crabbed in the cruise in a crosswind.As you flare, use rudder to point the nose of the aircraft in line with the runway. You may also require a touch of opposing aileron to keep the wings level.The NGX is great as far as crabbing and de-crabbing is concerned.

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If anything I find the rudder in FSX too effective. It doesn't take much to correct for a 30kt crosswind. In the real aircraft, I find that after 2 or 3 approaches in heavy crosswind, my leg tends to get sore. Same thing during engine out approaches in the sim. Thank god for rudder trim!!! I guess you can adjust your rudder pedals to the point that requires more movement. Since my airforce days I prefer the wing low method from 300ft.

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More to the point why is his training dept teaching him to use the rudder to point the nose into the wind?! It is not a cessna.You do not touch the rudder until you decrab during the flare or during an engine out.Other then that the rudder is a foot rest.Is your company really teaching you to fly a large transport aircraft like that during a crosswind approach?
That's what I was thinking, and what I fly right now is a 172R/S - I'll be up front and honest about that - but I know the difference. While it's 100% correct in a small plane, it's not what you use in a 73.Come out with me to IAD or DCA with me and you'll see that none of them use an approach like you would in a light aircraft. It's fall here. Winds get nasty here this time of year.

Kyle Rodgers

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In FSX, more difficult than the crosswind touchdown is to follow the center line after touchdown... Real 737 don't zig-zag like that on the runway.Teo Halfen


Teo Halfen

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lol, that's what I thought too


Magnus Meese

NGX Pilot

VATSIM C1, SUP and Pilot

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Don't forget, the yaw damper is there to sort out your rudder for you (ie balancing turns in flight). Kicking the rudder in flight just judders the airframe as the yaw damper re-corrects. You might as well kick the bottom of the flight-deck door than use rudder when in normal flight. Yaw damper only allows you to kick off your drift during the flare.While you kick-off drift, gently feed in opposite aileron to prevent your getting blown across the runway. You will eventually touch down upwind wing low, on the upwing gear. Continue to "fly" the aircraft as it is still aerodynamically "viable" for the first few seconds after touchdown. Balance everyting by letting down the downwind wing, using rudder to hold the centreline. At some point, gently lower the nosewheel to the runway. Thereafter, drive with rudder until 80knts when you grab the tiller.Rgds, Rob.

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No Jay, my post is 100% correct, I know everything and I've been flying the RW NG's since they rolled out, so I'm right - 100% ;)
I thought I was wrong once, but I was mistaken :-)

Jay

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