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tedpan

how to enter "maintain runway heading until XX' then turn to heading XX"

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I'd like to enter way fix/waypoint (?) that maintains runway heading until like say 600' then to say heading 352° and onto vectors or first SID waypoint.I've searched for days, I may not be using proper terminology hence not finding what I'm looking for.If anyone can please help; let me know if its possible, how to do it...Thanks in advance!

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That type of floating or "conditional" waypoint can't be directly inputted into the FMC by the pilots - they only exist as part of the navdata. That's how it is both in real life and in the NGX.You can do it if you learn to write terminal procedure files (in the PMDG/SIDSTAR folder) - that particular example is just this:KEEP HDG UNTIL 600 HDG 352 VECTORSThat said though, the easiest way to do this is just to use HDG SEL... absolutely nothing wrong with that. It's frequently done this way in real life - a lot of simmers seem to think the FMC must be used for everything, but the whole reason the manual controls on the MCP are there is because it's often a lot easier than trying to program something in the FMC.

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Forget about lnav, do it the old fashioned way. Infact, I would recommend you set up a short route you are familiar with and hand fly it the entire way, following the flight director. I'm sure you'll learn a bunch of stuff, and you'll have a great time as well.

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There has been an interesting discussion on using "conditional waypoints" on PPRUNE with reference to the the 2010 Air Blue crash. The crew on that fateful flight had entered such waypoints to help with their circle to land approach. Most pilots on there seem to be of the opinion that creating such waypoints is inadvisable as any mistake in entering such waypoints could easily be missed and could result CFIT.I think that the naming of waypoints came about due to the Korean Air 747 that in 1982 flew into Russian airspace and was shot down. On possible reason for the plane being so far off it's intended route was thought to be caused by a mistake in keying in the lat and long into the INS. Therefore it was decided if waypoints were given a name then it would be more difficult to type into the FMS/CDU the wrong information

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Nixon, flight crew cannot enter conditional waypoints into the system. These can only be added by selecting a procedure from the database that includes such waypoints.

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Nixon, flight crew cannot enter conditional waypoints into the system. These can only be added by selecting a procedure from the database that includes such waypoints.
Ok but you can form your points in space by using bearing and distance from other waypoints and if you input that information wrongly you could end up in the wrong place

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Ted,This is not the complete answer but you could do the following;type in as the first way point in the LEGS page; Substitute YMML (Melbourne, Australia) for an airport of your choice.YMML340/6 (YMML = Melbourne, 340 the runway heading and 6 is the distance in NM from the runway)that will set a waypoint at 6NM along the runway heading (rwy 34 in this case) after which you will then turn to the next waypoint. Remove "discontinuities" as necessary.Gerry - hope that helps

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I think that the naming of waypoints came about due to the Korean Air 747 that in 1982 flew into Russian airspace and was shot down. On possible reason for the plane being so far off it's intended route was thought to be caused by a mistake in keying in the lat and long into the INS. Therefore it was decided if waypoints were given a name then it would be more difficult to type into the FMS/CDU the wrong information
Turning points have been named by that time, and well before, even before navigational systems such as INS showed up.The problem with INS is, that at its time, it was pretty much impossible to make it with an inside database. The best that could have been done, and has been done, was having an Automatic Data Entry Unit, or ADEU on board. These read punched cards, and are, to some extent, simulated for ex. on CIVA INS for Flight Simulator.Even first FMS systems had database so small, that it only included selected parts of the world, and even within one airline, often had to be re-loaded into the system even on flight-by-flight basis.

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