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Brent

OAT display

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I've looked everywhere but I'm unable to find the OAT (outside air temp) displayed on the FMC or any other gauge in the Q400.  Is this missing or am I looking in the wrong spot?!

 

Thanks for any guidance,

 

Brent

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It is labeled SAT on the bottom of the engine display, this is the outside air temperature. 

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It is labeled SAT on the bottom of the engine display, this is the outside air temperature. 

 

Thanks - I didn't know they were equivalent!

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I'm sure there is a technical reason that differentiates OAT and SAT but in my laziness I've completely forgotten. might dig through my old texts and report back!

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RE: Majestic Q400 Dash8:

 

Is it possible to change the Outside Air Temperature (or SAT) readout from Centigrade to Farenheit, in the Majestic Q400 Dash8..?

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it possible to change the Outside Air Temperature (or SAT) readout from Centigrade to Farenheit, in the Majestic Q400 Dash8..?

 

Why would  you want  that isn't  that going  backwards  now :P

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The Majestic one certainly won't let you change it. Not sure even the real Q400 will allow temperatures to be displayed in Fahrenheit, it seems a little pointless, given all METARS (even in the USA) and the performance data is in Celsius.

 

For the benefit of others, here's some brief definitions of those temperatures acronyms:

  • OAT (Outside Air Temperature) or SAT (Static Air Temperature) = temperature of the air outside, when it is still
  • TAT (Total Air Temperature) = The temperature the aircraft is actually experiencing, this will be higher than OAT/SAT because at high speed the air hitting aircraft gets compressed a little and experiences friction from the aircraft's skin, which heats the air up.

Determining icing conditions is usually worked off SAT, and a typical definition will be encountering visible moisture (rain, clouds, drizzle, fog, mist, snow, hail or even low visibility) between -20°c and +10°c. Ice won't form below -20°c but it can form in positive temperatures, because in some parts of the aircraft (such as the engine air intake) the air accelerates which reduces its pressure and thus temperature, allowing ice to form locally.

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