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VeryBumpy

What does Yaw Damper do in FSX?

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I know its suppose to reduce yaw/roll oscillation in planes but does Ctrl-D actually do something noticeable within FSX? 

 

I turn it on/off in the Captain Sim B-52 and don't notice a thing. Perhaps it isn't modeled at all in this plane but then I don't know what effect to expect.

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In the aircraft that have that feature, I have never really noticed any difference between

 

off and on.  I would hope it dampens my YAWS.  Yaw, Sure!  Yumping Yiminey!

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So even the PMDG's make no use of Yaw Damper? Just dummy switches then I guess.

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Disable auto rudder in the realism settings. In the real world flying C-130's if we left in on we had very little rudder control.

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I've always noticed a difference with the yaw damper engaged - rudder authority becomes minimized. On some planes the effect is greater than others, but that can figure into the realism of the model. The Dash 8 tutorial, written by a real world captain, joked that the YD light was more for romantic mood lighting than anything else because of the minuscule effect of the yaw damper on Dash 8s. This carries over to the Majestic version, where the rudder is still quite sensitive with YD engaged. With other planes that require the yard damper to be turned off during landing, sometimes I would forget and totally botch the landing because of limited rudder travel. That was something I had to work on when learning the js4100 - I even had a post-it note that said "yaw damper" to remind me, after forgetting to disengage it caused me to go off runway during the rollout. But I definitely would not say it's a dummy switch on most addon airplanes, quite the opposite.

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So if its modeled, would one notice this change in yaw sensitivity on the ground taxiing or only in the air dynamics?

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I don't remember ever being able to tell on the ground. On planes that require yaw damper to be off for take off/landing, it's deactivated during taxi anyway. The airliners require it on all the time (though can sometimes fly with it inop), so to be honest I don't have experience with it off on the ground. Tried to turn it off in the NGX once while in flight and noticed that the tail would kick out alot more with rudder input. You really had to put your foot into the rudder though to see the difference. Overall it was easier to control the plane with it on, inputs were more finessed. Ill try experimenting on my next flight and see what happens if I turn it on/off during taxi. That's an interesting question.

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I think in fsx rudder input on the ground is bypassed since the same control is used for steering/nose wheel input. Even with out rudder on, there is no controllable rudder in flight but as soon as you get on the ground it works to steer. Just my observation thus far. On C-130's it was off for takeoff/landing, otherwise minimal rudder control which could cause control difficulties to overcome p-factor, etc

Also the rudder wont do anything until 60+ knots! that's why pilot will have one hand on the nose wheel steering and one I. The throttle until the rudder becomes 'effective'

Once the rudder is effective they will transition to the yoke/throttles

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On some planes that use the FSX yd, you barely have any manual rudder at all when it's on, and that's not correct.  On what real airplane does turning on the YD cause your pedals to behave as if they are mired in muck?

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With auto-rudder disabled, the yaw damper will effectively minimise the effect of rudder input whilst in the air.  You should always have it turned off for take-off and landing, otherwise you'll have minimal rudder authority i.e. with a cross wind landing.

 

In the real world, however, it's totally different and it's purpose is to reduce/eliminate the effect of Dutch Roll.........something that isn't modelled in FSX as far as I'm aware, and to minimise slip during turns by automatically applying rudder input.  Basically, airliners are flown with your feet off the pedals (well at least not giving rudder input anyway) during turns.

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On some planes that use the FSX yd, you barely have any manual rudder at all when it's on, and that's not correct.  On what real airplane does turning on the YD cause your pedals to behave as if they are mired in muck?

 

Airbus?  I think in normal law the ELACs and FACs provide turn coordination and yaw damping from the sidestick position.  In alt law (FACs still working) yaw damper only is provided.

 

scott s.

.

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@Paul Golding:

 

LOL.  I remember once years ago when I was flying our Cessna 421.  I made a minor heading change without using the rudder pedals.  The CFI beside me said, "So, now you are a f**king airline pilot?"

 

Ah, the good old days. . .

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