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teopereira

Auto-coordination (yaw damper) problem? (P3D V3.2)

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This is a normal turn after a take off and we can see this turn isn't being correctly auto-coodinated by the yaw damper (and, yes, yaw damper is on!)... So, what's the problem here with the yaw damper? Is this the normal behavior of a Boeing 737 or is this a bug in NGX or Prepar3d?

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The yaw damper isn't there to eliminate the pilot. A climbing left turn departure should require slight rudder. This is normal, just saw it too in the B77L departing KORD turning North. The yaw damper primary roll is to eliminate/reduce dutch roll (example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_roll )

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The yaw damper isn't there to eliminate the pilot. A climbing left turn departure should require slight rudder. This is normal, just saw it too in the B77L departing KORD turning North. The yaw damper primary roll is to eliminate/reduce dutch roll (example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_roll )

Thanks for your answer... Once I heard that Boeing/Airbus pilots used to get unaccustomed with the use of the rudder during turns... 

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Once I heard that Boeing/Airbus pilots used to get unaccustomed with the use of the rudder during turns...

 

Compared to what?  All jet jockys have an adjustment to make getting into something like a C-152. Sure, jets are flown for the most part flat footed but your example was one of a departure climb and that is a different beast from normal enroute changes in heading.

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Compared to what?  All jet jockys have an adjustment to make getting into something like a C-152. Sure, jets are flown for the most part flat footed but your example was one of a departure climb and that is a different beast from normal enroute changes in heading.

I found this post from a RW 737 pilot: "We use the rudder on TO but as soon as the main gear lifts off I let go of the pressure and just rest my feet on the pedals.

The only inflight situation I would use the rudder would be in case of engine failure. And the of course during the landing. You can either decrab on flare og land with the crab angle and then get on track after touchdown. In both cases you use the rudder. In all other situations (during normal flight) the yaw damper is doing the job."  http://www.avsim.com/topic/395182-rudder-usage/

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Teo,

 

If you look closely at the picture you provided, you can see that the Yaw Damp indicator is showing full displacement so the Yaw Damp system is attempting to coordinate the turn and the Slip indicator is displaced very little.  While not perfectly coordinated, I don't think it is an abnormal indication for a 30 degree bank turn under those conditions.  If the Yaw Damp indicator had not been displaced I would have been more concerned that something wasn't working but it appears the system is working as designed.

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Thank you, Paul.

I was thinking the same thing, but I'm constantly learning that my train of thought is on the wrong track.

 

Your turn and slip is incorporated into the PFD while the Yaw Damper indicator is showing you where your rudder is being commanded. (Am I right?)

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Your turn and slip is incorporated into the PFD while the Yaw Damper indicator is showing you where your rudder is being commanded. (Am I right?)

 

Correct on the PFD, the Yaw Damper indicator reveals how much rudder displacement is commanded by the main yaw damper, it does not indicate standby yaw damper or pilot rudder commands (FCOM 9.20.13).

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