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Pimax 8K & 5K VR Headsets Coming to Kickstarter Later This Month

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So, is it hot air? Can they pull it off? Could it become a simming must-have? The headset is certainly not a looker: in fact, to me it's actively ugly, but I suppose it's what's inside that counts.......

This might be interesting; and could certainly light a fire under of some of the competition..... https://www.roadtovr.com/pimax-8k-vr-headset-coming-kickstarter-later-month/

 

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Pimax seems to be making some noise in this space. Hope they can get this off the ground and it can work with mid-tier systems (perhaps eye tracking is required for that). If they can do something successfully, I am sure they will be purchased by a much larger tech player for a nice gob of money.

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Seems too good to be true. Not sure our PCs will have the processing speed in either the CPU or GPU to cope with the resolution though.

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As far as having enough performance, the Pimax folks are saying that if you can drive a single 4K screen at a good fps (maybe with lower graphic settings), then this will work well - we'll see!

 

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1 hour ago, whitav8 said:

As far as having enough performance, the Pimax folks are saying that if you can drive a single 4K screen at a good fps (maybe with lower graphic settings), then this will work well - we'll see!

 

They are using something they call "Brainwarp" https://www.roadtovr.com/hands-pimaxs-8k-headset-proves-high-fov-vr-coming/

Quote

 

All that aside, how exactly do Pimax expect people to drive two sets of 4k displays at higher enough refresh rates needed for good, low latency VR? Enter ‘Brain-warp’. Brain-warp is a technique where you render and display an image to one eye only, and then render and display for the other eye, in a sequence such that one eye is seeing an image and the other isn’t at any given moment in time. This way, they’re actually rendering a single 4K image at 120 times a second, but the user perceives it as a complete 8K image at 120Hz. How? Because that frequency is high enough that we don’t perceive that one eye is blind while the other isn’t, at least for a tiny fraction of a second. It’s like raising one hand to one eye, lowering that hand and raising your other hand to your other eye, and doing that very so fast that you simply don’t notice it. Active-shutter 3D glasses use the same concept, often at the same 120Hz refresh rate.


 

 

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