Sign in to follow this  
Guest FlyHeaven

A320 Inflight Emergency

Recommended Posts

Those of you in the LA area we have a Jet Blue A320 with a nose wheel stuck at a 90 degree angle. He's currently in a holding pattern over the ocean trying to burn off fuel. Stay tuned

Share this post


Link to post
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

The a/c took off from KBUR headed for JFK when the warning light came on. It's Jet Blue flight 292. It appears that they planning on landing at LAX instead of Long Beach which is Jet Blue's hub.

Share this post


Link to post

The elevator trim maintenance done on the Air Midwest B1900 that crashed at Charlotte was done here in the U.S.

Share this post


Link to post

[a href=http://www.nbc4.tv/news/5004411/detail.html#]NBC coverage[/a]-JeremyThe Ozark DogfighterHappy Flying!

Share this post


Link to post

Saw the very same thing as a controller at Beale AFB, cept it was a 707.Lots of sparks, not too dangerous...but h e l l on the plane!btPS...love the Media's headlines, A320 to "attempt" emergency landing. Got news for them; once they touch down the will be landing and it will be an emergency!

Share this post


Link to post

Mechanics working for outside contractors - whether in the US or overseas - are generally agreed to be under less pressure than in-house mechanics to take short-cuts because their own employer isn't the one pressing to get the plane back in service. In the Alaska Airlines plane that crashed off California due to inadequate elevator maintainance, the mechanics worked for the airline itself, and were pressed to 'stretch' the replacement of expensive parts. Mechanics for an outside contractor might, if anything, be under the opposite pressure - to replace parts that don't really need it.Also, of course, outsourcing to an overseas contractor as opposed to a domestic one has the enormous advantage of getting the work away from the lazy, overpaid Union members that are the bane of US industry.Richard

Share this post


Link to post

Well, that was a pretty landing. Whew...-JeremyThe Ozark DogfighterHappy Flying!

Share this post


Link to post

He's down and safe, great job by the pilots. Really smooth, nose gear held. Thank God.

Share this post


Link to post

Impressive landing, he tracked the centerline the entire time.Jeff

Share this post


Link to post

Wasn't there a service bulletin on the a320 for the nosegear? Wasn't it this same problem?checking Google...-JeremyThe Ozark DogfighterHappy Flying!

Share this post


Link to post

Very nice indeed.... touched it down very gently. Should be several awards given for unbelievably inane comments by the bubblehead TV commentators though.How about "I expect the family members will be relieved." ?Richard

Share this post


Link to post

Amazing coverage, and perfect landing. I wish my soft field landings were as good as that!

Share this post


Link to post

>>Also, of course, outsourcing to an overseas contractor as>opposed to a domestic one has the enormous advantage of>getting the work away from the lazy, overpaid Union members>that are the bane of US industry.>>RichardAs a pilot with one of the regional airlines here in the US, I am a member of ALPA. From 2000-2004, as a First Officer, my pay started at $18.52/hr, topping out at $32.41/hr at the end of that tenure. We were paid only for the actual block-out to block-in time of each flight, with an average hourly flight time of 75hrs per month. Our workweek typically consisted of a four day trip which would consist of workdays scheduled typically for 6-14hrs of working duty time. If there were weather/maintenance/ATC delays, the workday can be stretched to 16hrs. Actual flight time each day could not be scheduled for more than 8hrs per day, except if delayed though, there is no limit on how much a pilot actually pilots an aircraft each day, as long as the 16hrs of duty is not exceeded. My annual pay averaged about $24,000/yr as an FO. As a captain of an Embraer 145, I have jumped to about $50,000/yr of pay. Thank you for calling us lazy and overpaid.

Share this post


Link to post

What a wicked landing! Mad skill :) I liked how he kept the nose off as long as he could!And the gear leg amazed me...those side loads must have been huge but it held and has saved the airline a massive hull-repair bill!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post

"an average hourly flight time of 75hrs per month.... I have jumped to about $50,000/yr of pay."The typical non-union employee in the US has to work 75 hours a WEEK to make $50,000 a year. In any event, pilots are a non-typical case. Few other workers have to pay for their own training, nor pay to accumulate the experience needed to be eligible for their jobs. (When I got my MER I got a come-on from a regional cargo carrier offering me a "job" as First Officer getting minimum wage, but simultaneously paying THEM $55 - $95 an hour for "Industry Training")My comment was aimed at the industrial Unions - such as mechanics. $60/hr average for a mechanic IS overpaid, and the absurdly protectionist "Three men to do one mans job" Union rules ARe a sign of lazy and unmotivated workers. If I could have maintainance work that's currently done by Union workers moved to a place where it could be done by non-Union ones, I'd jump at it - and the people who flew in the planes would be safer.Richard

Share this post


Link to post

Ken:"HOWEVER, it's not like mechanics make a lot of money."Really? The average for an airline's in-house mechanics is about $60/hr. Well over $100,000 a year before you do a single hour of overtime or collect any shift differential.Richard

Share this post


Link to post

You missed that entire point. The 75hrs of pay is only for stick time. We are on duty, that is preflighting, boarding, running between planes, waiting for flights, and running the three ring circus that is when everything is fubar trying to get the flight out, up to 16 hrs each day. Typical month has us on duty for 192hrs. Which means 117hrs of work is for free.How much work do you do for free,Richard? Anyways, if your comments were meant only for the stereotypical union industrial worker, then you should have said so in the first place, instead of making a broad offensive comment.

Share this post


Link to post

:-lol Thank's for backing me up Kevin,As an airline mechanic,I have seen it all. When I worked for contractor's in Alabama,Georga,Florida,South Carolina,ad'nausium,Working DC9's to 747's, I saw 100 times more hackage,dishonesty and stupidity than at any airline I was employed at. What misinformed people don't know is,that for every day the jet sit's in the contractor's hanger, they are fined thousand's.You have people working the jet that have never been to a class on it,let alone a school,and their moral charactor is usually suspect, I wouldn't let most of them near a any machinery.One instance off the top of my head,was a DC9 that had the fastners RTV'd into the R/H wing to fuselage fillet,because the nutplates were blown out,and they didn't want to take the interiour out to rivet new one's in.The flightcrew was coming from Atlanta to do the operational checkflight for relase back into airline service. Well at 300 kts on the climbout the fillet departed the a/c,and they had to return to Lakecity. As I was standing there observing the 3 ring circus,More enpty suits,(managers) than I had ever seen before came scurrying out of their hiding places like cockroaches. As they were getting ready to light off the engines to taxi back to the hanger,A layed off airline mechanic made the comment that as the engine inlet is in direct line with the wing root,maybe they might want to chech the #2 engine for FOD damage! This is just a minor example,I could list more.I am not saying we don't screw up at the airlines,We are human,But the idiotic remark made by a previous poster is a typical managment stooge ploy to wreck what little job security the middle class worker has left,all in the name of giving our pay cuts to wealthy wall street criminals that are running the airlines into the ground.Oh well, I guess that's the american way? well the few of us left in the industry that have morals are tiring of playing God every day for less money than an auto mechanic! Just think of what I have said when your sitting in a lawn dart that you can't pull off the side of the road when thing's go sour. Nice landing tho.:-)

Share this post


Link to post

>Very nice indeed.... touched it down very gently. Should be>several awards given for unbelievably inane comments by the>bubblehead TV commentators though.>>How about "I expect the family members will be relieved." ?Great job by the pilots, terrible attitude by the newsmedia smelling cheap sensation. Listening to the questions by the news anchors to the aviation experts, I had the impression that the former were looking forward to some "spectacular touchdown" (in terms of audio-visual effects) or maybe even something worse. In the end, the landing was spectacular, but in a completely different way ;-) A.G.

Share this post


Link to post

Richard No mechanic's I know make $60 hr!

Share this post


Link to post

"Union rules ARe a sign of lazy and unmotivated workers"Are you speaking of the airline industry, or all unions? My wife is part of a union, toils longer hours than I do AND most airline mechanics, and earns half as much as I do (I am non union). Without the union, she'd be lucky to earn a third. She earns far less than $50K and still exceeds 50 hours a week. Whether your statement is true of airline mechanics or not, it reads as a statement of someone with many prejudices--and many misconceptions, about unions and union workers since it is a generalization. What I do know is if I couldn't work tomorrow, my wife's union has bought her only a subsistence wage--but at least it has bought her that. I'd much rather she have the union than not have it, and no one had better consider her lazy for expecting that.Care to clarify your remarks?-John

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this