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Guest FlyHeaven

A320 Inflight Emergency

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Those of you in the LA area we have a Jet Blue A320 with a nose wheel stuck at a 90 degree angle. He's currently in a holding pattern over the ocean trying to burn off fuel. Stay tuned

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The a/c took off from KBUR headed for JFK when the warning light came on. It's Jet Blue flight 292. It appears that they planning on landing at LAX instead of Long Beach which is Jet Blue's hub.

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The elevator trim maintenance done on the Air Midwest B1900 that crashed at Charlotte was done here in the U.S.

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[a href=http://www.nbc4.tv/news/5004411/detail.html#]NBC coverage[/a]-JeremyThe Ozark DogfighterHappy Flying!

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Saw the very same thing as a controller at Beale AFB, cept it was a 707.Lots of sparks, not too dangerous...but h e l l on the plane!btPS...love the Media's headlines, A320 to "attempt" emergency landing. Got news for them; once they touch down the will be landing and it will be an emergency!

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Mechanics working for outside contractors - whether in the US or overseas - are generally agreed to be under less pressure than in-house mechanics to take short-cuts because their own employer isn't the one pressing to get the plane back in service. In the Alaska Airlines plane that crashed off California due to inadequate elevator maintainance, the mechanics worked for the airline itself, and were pressed to 'stretch' the replacement of expensive parts. Mechanics for an outside contractor might, if anything, be under the opposite pressure - to replace parts that don't really need it.Also, of course, outsourcing to an overseas contractor as opposed to a domestic one has the enormous advantage of getting the work away from the lazy, overpaid Union members that are the bane of US industry.Richard

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Well, that was a pretty landing. Whew...-JeremyThe Ozark DogfighterHappy Flying!

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He's down and safe, great job by the pilots. Really smooth, nose gear held. Thank God.

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Wasn't there a service bulletin on the a320 for the nosegear? Wasn't it this same problem?checking Google...-JeremyThe Ozark DogfighterHappy Flying!

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Very nice indeed.... touched it down very gently. Should be several awards given for unbelievably inane comments by the bubblehead TV commentators though.How about "I expect the family members will be relieved." ?Richard

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Amazing coverage, and perfect landing. I wish my soft field landings were as good as that!

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>>Also, of course, outsourcing to an overseas contractor as>opposed to a domestic one has the enormous advantage of>getting the work away from the lazy, overpaid Union members>that are the bane of US industry.>>RichardAs a pilot with one of the regional airlines here in the US, I am a member of ALPA. From 2000-2004, as a First Officer, my pay started at $18.52/hr, topping out at $32.41/hr at the end of that tenure. We were paid only for the actual block-out to block-in time of each flight, with an average hourly flight time of 75hrs per month. Our workweek typically consisted of a four day trip which would consist of workdays scheduled typically for 6-14hrs of working duty time. If there were weather/maintenance/ATC delays, the workday can be stretched to 16hrs. Actual flight time each day could not be scheduled for more than 8hrs per day, except if delayed though, there is no limit on how much a pilot actually pilots an aircraft each day, as long as the 16hrs of duty is not exceeded. My annual pay averaged about $24,000/yr as an FO. As a captain of an Embraer 145, I have jumped to about $50,000/yr of pay. Thank you for calling us lazy and overpaid.

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