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mgh

Aeronautical Information Package (AIPs)

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In the UK, and many other countries, practically all the information needed about aerodromes can be obtained from a single source through their Aeronautical Information Packages (AIPs). These are created to an ICAO standard and are very convenient because many authorities post this information on their websites (often free).For anyone not familar with them, AIPs comprise a text document as well as all the aerodrome charts. The standard sections in the text document are:- Aerodrome Geographical and Administrative Data- Operational Hours- Handling Services and Facilities- Passenger Facilities- Rescue and Firefighting Services- Seasonal Availability - Clearing- Aprons, Taxiways and Check Locations Data- Surface Movement Guidance and Control System Markings- Aerodrome Obstacles- Meteorological Information Provided- Runway Physical Characteristics- Declared Distances- Approach and Runway Lighting- Other Lighting, Seconsdary Power Supply- Helicopter Landing Area- ATS Airspace- ATS Communication Facilities- Radio Navigation and Landing Aids- Local Traffic Regulations- Noise Abatement Procedures- Flight Procedures- Additional Information- Charts Relating to the AerodromeIn the UK the same structure is used for all licenced aerodromes, but only the necessary relevant sections are included. Thus, the Gatwick (EGKK) AIP comprises 20 pages of text and 31 charts wheres that for Panshanger (EGLG) - a small grass aerodrome - consists of only 2 pages including the aerodrome chart.Many other countries adopt this standard format but I haven't found anything similar for airports in the USA. Is there a similar integrated source and, if not, does anyone know if the USA is considering adopting this ICAO format?

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For the US, the government site was DAFIF. It's now recently something else and I can't remember what it is.However, I use www.airnav.com which pulls from the same source, but it also has the NOTAMS and METAR with TAF on the same page, so for me it's really nice to be able to print out little trip tickets for each of my flights.All you do is type in the airport code or city, or you can also browse by state. You'll then see all the SID's/STAR's and IAP's, etc.Hope this helps a bit.

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Also, before going to www.airnav.com I first go to www.simroutes.com and get the prefered route if it's flight within the US, then I go to airnav for the charts I'll need.

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The charts and stuff are supposed to be still online somewhere. The raw NavData is not. If you can't find them from our government site, then just use airnav.com, because it's all the same and current, plus it's easier to navigate, IMO.We also use the IACO codes for airports as it pertains to flying activities (i.e. charts, etc.).I'm not sure what else you're looking for. If you mean we don't have detailed ground diagrams with parking areas labeled, etc., then you are correct, it's nothing like what you see in the EU and UK. We've never had those. Wish we did.

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The facilities directories are getting better by the day but it will take a long while before we have what ICAO countries and jeppesen produce now.

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We're obviously spoiled in the UK and in other countries using the ICA standards.Where in the USA can I find detailed flight procedures for any particular airport?

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I've tried airnav.com but it doesn't give the same amnount of detail either in terms of physical detail or procedures as an integrated AIP for comparable airports KJFK and EGKK for example. This real life information must surely available somewhere?

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For the US, airnav.com has the same info as the government charts. Those are the procedures. If they aren't there, then they don't exist.

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My point is that the AIP consists of more than the charts and their associated procedures. As examples, the text part of the AIP headed "Flight Procedures" for London Gatwick (EGKK) includes:"Aircraft inbound to London Gatwick via the airways system will be routed via the Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STARs) detailed at..." and"IFR aircraft inbound to London Gatwick direct from the London FIR will be required to use the procedure via the Mayfield holding pattern detailed at..."It also deals with the procedure to be followed in the event of radio communication failures amongst other things.There much other information in the AIP such as Declared Distances (TORA, TODA, ASDA, LDA) - that are not necessarily the same as runway length - the noise abatement procedures, including routeing, and the need for continuous descents on approach.Surely similar information must exist for airports in the USA for use by pilots?

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I think I know what you're talking about now and have seen something similar before I just can't remember where.:+

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