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Dondo

FU glider flyers...neat.

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Hi Dondo,That's nice for you but I'm wondering why you're posting an old Fly2 post in the Flight Unlimited forum. Those of us interested in Fly2 will be reading that forum as well and most likely have already seen it there.Cheers,Rich W.

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I guess when I think of simulated gliders, I think of Flight Unlimted. I remember reading a post here asking about what people thought of Fly!II. Maybe, on the off chance that there are some Fly!II fans here, they may have missed that post. Maybe not. Who knows.. :)Anyway, I kind of lump Fly!II and FU in the same catagory. Both abandoned by the developer before they really came into their own. Both are excellent and I play them regularly. If I could just get my CH Pro Pedals USB to work in FU, I'd use it ALOT more.No reason I really posted it here. I just thought you all were such a nice group of simmers that you could appriciate the work still taking place in Fly!.Pieter

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Pieter.There should not be any problems using your rudder device in FU3.You can try to put this lines into the flight3.cfg.file:joy_device 1rudder_device 2 3I am using this settings with the rudder pedals as device nr.1 in the control panel.If yours are listed as nr.2 device, you only have to reverse the numbers in the cfg.file.Hope this helps.Best regards.Lars Peter.

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Thanks.Will I be able to get my prop and mixture levers to work in FU using this same method?Pieter

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Well, that depends on what type of joystick you are using.If you are using the CH USB yoke, I think you have to use the "combo-drivers" from CH products. More information about it is available on their web.sites.As a default setup you can try this "joystick" file.Put it in the flight 3 root folder and open it in notepad.Play around with the device numbers until you find your settings.Lars Peter.

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May I just add, my CH USB pedals work a lot more realistically in FU3 than in FS2002/FS2004. The reason is that FS seems to code for overly sensitive "foot work". Even with the gain settings way down I tend to go wavering down the runway since it only takes the thought of an input to turn the rudder / steering left or right. However, there's one aspect that doesn't work in FU3, namely differential toe braking. Whether you brake with the left pedal, right pedal or both makes no difference.As mentioned in other posts FS has a limited ground handling model since the wheels aren't laterally stable. The fact that they are free to slip-slide sideways may account for the overly sensitive pedal response on the ground. How is Fly! doing in this respect?best regards,Hans Petter

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Fly! has differential brakeing. I'm not exactly positive what you were talking about with lateral stability, but you can't power slide an aircraft in Fly!II as you can in FS. I've landed at a 30* angle in FS and still rolled down the centerline of the RW. Fly!II you'll bust a gear doing that. The sensitivy in Fly!II seems about right to me I guess. Nothing like the hyperudders in FS9. The force feedback in Fly!II is far superior then the FS9 offerings as well, even though we weren't talking about that...:)Pieter

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I don't use foot pedals at all - I use the keyboard, and differential braking is certainly implemented there in FU3 (comma and stop keys for left and right). Possibly the foot pedals can be configured better?RobD.

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I have Button 4 of my joystick set up for the toe brakes, and when I apply these after touchdown, my plane always veers to the left. This is presumably because the left brake command appears BEFORE the right brake command in my joykeys.cfg file. Is this differential braking ? I am assuming that the original poster means "simulation of separate left and right toe brakes".....or am I way off here ?Chris Low,ENGLAND.

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Yes, simulated left and right brakeing, as in a real aircraft. I didn't get a chance to mess with things too much last night, but I will tinker a little this weekend, see if I can't assign the prop/mixture to axis's in FU and muddle around with the toe brakes as well.Thanks for the help everyone.

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I tried to simulate applying the toe brakes simultaneously, but the software always appears to apply one slightly before the other. That's why I generally let the plane slow down gradually, and then apply the brakes when it is moving more slowly. However, sometimes this is difficult when you don't have much tarmac to work with !Chris Low,ENGLAND.

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The toe- brakes left/right using CH-pro pedals should work ok.Anyway it does on both my old win.98 and the new XP mashine.Lars Peter.:-)

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Gliders? Does anyone else model winch launches? Sorry...Anyway, the toe brakes DO work! In most aircraft, the nosewheel/tailwheel is steerable and therefore has lateral drag programmed into the flight model. Simply hitting one toe brake will not really do much because:* Toe brakes are for 'normal' braking and do not apply enough pressure to lock the wheels, even under slippery conditions. This is normal. If you want to do an 'Airport 76', hit the parking brakes! If adjusted properly, you shouldn't actually lockup either!* Due to the 'steered' nose/tailwheel, the lateral drag of the wheel will prevent the aircraft from turning much.Those of you familiar with the GeeBee will have noticed that it's the ONLY way to steer when taking off or also when landing, before the tailwheel comes down. In fact, the original R2 had a castoring tailwheel (unsteered). I tried to emulate this and suceeded however, apart from being awkward for beginners (as if the R2 isn't hard enough), Delmar Benjamin actually fitted a steerable tailwheel to his R2 anyway ;) Hence my R2s got a tailwheel with lateral drag.Anyway, for you doubters out there, grab the Dash-8 and try this:Engines running, full left or right rudder, apply power and.... you don't move at all. OK, reduce power on the 'inside' engine - you will start turning at 90 degrees. Now, hit the 'inside' brake. Nothing happens - you still turn, maybe a little slower. Hit the 'outside' brake - you stop. You may have to juggle engine settings a bit but it works. It's the ONLY way to get the Dash-8/DC3 to turn on a dime!BTW, in some real aircraft, the steerable wheel has limited directional control for better high-speed stability. When taxiing, the rudder is disconnected from the wheel and it just 'castors'.:-waveJon Point*************************(effyouthree@hotmail.com)*************************

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I believe that in some fighter aircraft, nose wheel steering has automatic cutoffs at speed, eg the F16, so that when you land, you steer by rudder (only one engine so you can't steer by differential engine) until the NWS light switches on when your speed has dropped sufficiently.RobD.

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