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HoratioWondersocks

Take off correct procedures question

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Hello AllI only fly passenger jets at the moment,and i was wondering whether i was using the correct take off procedure.I line up after being cleared .I then apply brakes and spool up the engines to about forty percent wait a little and then all the way up (approx 96 percent)i then wait a little longer and then release the parking brake and sprint down the runway etc no problems after that,but is that more or less the correct way to take off.cheers Andy

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Hi,It depends a bit on the aircraft but this is how I do it (and I guess a lot of others too)- Lining up on runway: Strobes On / Transponder On- Cleared of takeoff: Landing lights On- Manually advance throttles to 60% and let them stabilize- Release brakes- (Make sure you already are in TOGA mode)- Engage autothrottle (most of the time if not always AT is used for takeoff)- Cross check at 80 kts- V1 Vr V2- Postive climb: Landing gear up- Climb sequenceEDIT:Here you can download lots of interesting information about various aircrafts:http://www.smartcockpit.com/

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Andy,You're about right, don't worry with the brakes though, take off performance allows for a certain amount of rolling, sometimes you get cleared to go before you're lined up so just keep it rolling. Lift them up to around 40 or 50% (for modern high bypass engines, 60% for older straight through turbo jets), when they settle, apply power. We rarely use full power (TOGA) for take off, usually a derate but it doesn't really matter here. The power should be set and stable by 80kts.Keep it on the paved surface and start the pitch up (rotate) when you reach rotate speed (Vr) at about 3 degrees a second. 15 degrees nose up is a fair initial pitch, then adjust to maintain V2 + an amount you're happy with, 10 to 20 is common. Climb out to acceleration altitude (usually 1000ft above the airfield but sometimes more) then set climb power and nose down (about 10 degrees is a good initial guess) and start accelerating to 250kts, retracting the flaps as you are fast enough. Don't descend during this but you may not be climbing that much, 500 to 1500 ft/min. Once you're clean you can start worrying about after take off checks and the like and move on to the climb segment of the flight.Hope this helps,Ian

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> We rarely use full power (TOGA) for take off, usually a derate but it doesn't really matter hereTOGA isn't neccesarily full power, it depends on the setting in the FMC or Thrust Rating Computer. If that is set to derated takeoff, TOGA will also derate the power.

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The only time I spool up with the brakes set is if I'm taking off on a short runway. It's normal to put the throttles to 40-60%, let them stabilize (required to check and make sure you're getting the power you need), then set takeoff thrust, but unless I'm using short-field takeoff procedures, I'll just let it roll (I often don't even stop on the runway once lined up, I'll often just line up and go if I can finish my before-takeoff checks and tasks while taxiing onto the runway (which depends on the aircraft))..Hope this helps... It works well for me... :)

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Try a laden 737 at KMDW with no spool up! I have dragged a few fence's into the landing gear bay. :D

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>TOGA isn't neccesarily full power, it depends on the setting>in the FMC or Thrust Rating Computer. >If that is set to derated takeoff, TOGA will also derate the>power.Nope, you're dead right, I'm talking Airbus. TOGA in the Airbus is full power but as you correctly point out, on Boeings, TO/GA is whatever take off power you have set in the FMC/Thrust computer.Sorry for the confusion,Ian

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Thanks very much guys,thats a lot of useful information there,i have often wondered weather the way i take off was right or not.It just didn't feel right to be sitting there with brakes on engines roaring and then suddenly releasing brakes and jumping forward like a drag racing car.I shall try some of the ways you have described on my next flightsThe TOGA debate interests me as i never have used it for my takeoffs so i may experiment with these to.I would like to get flying now but as i accidentally jabbed my thumb into my eye this morning i can just about squint at my computer screen to type this ,but i fear i may be grounded till eye is working again BLOODY NUISANCE.CHEERS from One eyed Jake formally known as Andy:-)

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>Try a laden 737 at KMDW with no spool up! I have dragged a>few fence's into the landing gear bay. :Dlol. But in real life you wouldnt be taking off that runway. at least not without changing something in your configuration whether it be using 25 flaps, more power, less GTOW or whatever. We do not use the applying brakes method at our company since it has been proven that the difference in runway used is negligable.

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Indeed, real life take off performance calculations do not give any performance credit for an initial run up against the brakes. It will just say you're too heavy.That's exactly what my little FS take off performance calculator does (UTOPIA) :-).Shameless plug over,Ian

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Don't forget that if you're having trouble getting off the runway then you also need to think about configuring your take-off trim - a few degrees up should do it.;)

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