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Guest cliffie1931

Suggestions For Short Flights In The Usa?

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Not being an American I am not as knowledgable about American geography as I would like to be.Consequently I would appreciate suggestions for flights of a maximum of about an hour and a half over interesting routes. Till now I've been flying Boston/New York and San Fransico/Los Angeles but I should spread my wings a bit.I need these routes to brush up my programming skill in the FMC of the MD-11. Cliff

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Toronto to Boston, Chicago or Newark would be good routes me thinks,Cheers,

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Maybe here.Currently shows more international routes, but on a normal weekday there are usually a few 1-2 hour routes.Alex

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KLAS/KLAX is one of my favorite short hops. The KLAS departures are RNAV, the SID connects to the KLAX STAR at HEC (no enroute segments) and there are mountains on both ends.

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Spokane, WA (KGEG) to Seattle, WA (KSEA). The flight is less than 45 minutes with scenic mountains the whole way. SouthWest Airlines and Alaska Airlines fly this route pretty regularly.

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Phoenix (KPHX), where I live is a pretty big hub in the desert southwest. A few good flights:KPHX-KLAXKPHX-KDENKPHX-KABQKPHX-KSLCKPHX-KDFWIf you go to http://flightaware.com/statistics/ifr-route you can get the actual real life routes currently being used to enter into the MCDU.

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For scenery, you can't beat the western states, Montana, Colorado, Utah. California, etc. One of my favorites is KSFO to KSLC ( San Francisco-Salt Lake City), the visuals are stunning, expecially if you use GEX, FEX, etc

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One other thing I should mention, this time of year the previaling winds are usually west to east, and with the jet stream, it can add a lot of time going east to west, if you want to consider that for your flight plans.

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Yeah.... I love flying in Oregon or California and also Nevada, beautiful areas. Kind regardsFrank BTW: Merry X-mas :(

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For a short hop, I like Los Angeles to Las Vegas. You'll fly over the mountains surrounding LA, across the desert and fly over the Hover Dam in the last part of the STAR. One of the most common routes is LOOP4 DAG KEPEC2 at FL290. Take off at KLAX on 25R and land at KLAS on 25R. Watch your altitude when you are making the U turn in the KEPEC2 STAR or the mountains will eat you. First flight I'd do in the day to see the scenery, but after that, try leaving KLAX at dusk. You will arrive in Vegas with all the lights Vegas is famous for including the light shooting up from the Luxor Pyramid.Jeff P.

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Toronto to Boston, Chicago or Newark would be good routes me thinks,Cheers,
My thanks to all of you for these suggestions. I'm listing them and look forward to enjoying the fruits of your experiences.A good 2009 to you!Cliff

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For scenery, you can't beat the western states, Montana, Colorado, Utah. California, etc. One of my favorites is KSFO to KSLC ( San Francisco-Salt Lake City), the visuals are stunning, expecially if you use GEX, FEX, etc
Google doesn't lead me to GEX and FEX Jay. What are they? Cliff

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Here's what I suggest. If you like airliner short and medium hauls first make sure you have a standard map of the US so you see where cities are. Then go to the web site of a regional or US airline, get to a site map, and look for complete schedules in .pdf format. Some of the major airlines also do medium length flights.Here's a US map of Southwest Airlines which has a variety of short and medium routes. Hover your mouse over a city to see the routes available. They use 737-700 or 800 aircraft.http://southwest.com/travel_center/routema...tml?ref=wwf_fgnFor a full schedule in .pdf format for SWA go to:http://southwest.com/cgi-bin/requestSchedule#pdfscroll to the bottom of the page, leave it at Retrieve All Cities, Click Retrieve Schedule, select a date range (try for at least two weeks in a season of interest), and click on the one in the list. It will load up in Acrobat Reader and then you can save the schedule into your document or other folder. Open it and I suggest you look at Oakland for a number of non-stop flights of various lengths around Western US if you are looking for interesting terrain.To get airport charts including terminal procedures in a bundle for each airport of your flight, go to flightaware.com, enter the ICAO code (such as KOAK) near the page bottom and click Airport Information, when the page opens click Terminal Procedures, and go to the Bundled Procedures section and click All Procedures (with diagram) to grab it into Acrobat Reader. If you like it, save the document.If on the opening page of flightaware you enter say KOAK near the bottom and click Airport Activity, a page will open showing on a map flights in blue arriving or leaving KOAK. In the arrivals or departures tables click on the flight number of one with the arrival or departure and apparent length (and aircraft) of interest. A page will open with various information including the flight plan of the route taken (excluding the airport codes) and current and cruise altitude. Depending on the flight planner you use you can either copy and paste this information into it or just print it to manually create one as necessary.Once you get the hang of this it should not take you too long to set up an airliner flight of interest with all of the information you would need including the route, navaid setup for your FMC and/or nav radios, and altitude and departure and arrival routes to keep you from hitting terrain obstacles.

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Here's what I suggest. If you like airliner short and medium hauls first make sure you have a standard map of the US so you see where cities are. Then go to the web site of a regional or US airline, get to a site map, and look for complete schedules in .pdf format. Some of the major airlines also do medium length flights.Here's a US map of Southwest Airlines which has a variety of short and medium routes. Hover your mouse over a city to see the routes available. They use 737-700 or 800 aircraft.http://southwest.com/travel_center/routema...tml?ref=wwf_fgnFor a full schedule in .pdf format for SWA go to:http://southwest.com/cgi-bin/requestSchedule#pdfscroll to the bottom of the page, leave it at Retrieve All Cities, Click Retrieve Schedule, select a date range (try for at least two weeks in a season of interest), and click on the one in the list. It will load up in Acrobat Reader and then you can save the schedule into your document or other folder. Open it and I suggest you look at Oakland for a number of non-stop flights of various lengths around Western US if you are looking for interesting terrain.To get airport charts including terminal procedures in a bundle for each airport of your flight, go to flightaware.com, enter the ICAO code (such as KOAK) near the page bottom and click Airport Information, when the page opens click Terminal Procedures, and go to the Bundled Procedures section and click All Procedures (with diagram) to grab it into Acrobat Reader. If you like it, save the document.If on the opening page of flightaware you enter say KOAK near the bottom and click Airport Activity, a page will open showing on a map flights in blue arriving or leaving KOAK. In the arrivals or departures tables click on the flight number of one with the arrival or departure and apparent length (and aircraft) of interest. A page will open with various information including the flight plan of the route taken (excluding the airport codes) and current and cruise altitude. Depending on the flight planner you use you can either copy and paste this information into it or just print it to manually create one as necessary.Once you get the hang of this it should not take you too long to set up an airliner flight of interest with all of the information you would need including the route, navaid setup for your FMC and/or nav radios, and altitude and departure and arrival routes to keep you from hitting terrain obstacles.
I've only now been able to read your helpful response Ron and it's both interesting and helpful. As I write a copy is spouting out of the printer ready to send me on my next bout of upgrading my learning curve.Thank you.Cliff

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