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Guest FSRules

Learning to Land Nicely

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Hey, does anyone know how to kiss the runway without having to dive the plane so low to get the right altitude? I like using the ILS approach and I love the glide slope, but how do I make sure the plane doesn't have to do a nose dive to descent (yes I want to use full flaps)?

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Hey, does anyone know how to kiss the runway without having to dive the plane so low to get the right altitude? I like using the ILS approach and I love the glide slope, but how do I make sure the plane doesn't have to do a nose dive to descent (yes I want to use full flaps)?
You have to make sure you are using correct speeds for the aircraftt in question. most add-on aircraft come with manuals that have certain power settings for climb, cruise, landing, flaps down, flaps up etc etc.Other than that just keep practicing

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How do I access these files while I'm playing FS9? is it on the flights section?
Just use the "Select a Flight" option and find the flight you wish to use. There are thre of them - for the default 737, 747, and 777 and all start with the words Pre-set Landing.

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Thanks for the nice landing training addon. I was wondering, though, do pilots often use ILS approaches and glide slopes to land, or is using that simply the easy way out?Thanks.

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Thanks for the nice landing training addon. I was wondering, though, do pilots often use ILS approaches and glide slopes to land, or is using that simply the easy way out?Thanks.
I believe I read somewhere a few years back that real world pilots are required to do a "hands on" approach and landing every (forgot the exact number) third or fourth time. The rest of the time they use ILS approaches if the airport is so equipted.I hope some real world pilot (active or retired) will jump in and confirm or clarify what I just typed as my memory is not what it once was. :(

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The trick is to set your self in a plane you know inside out on an ILS and save the flight.Redo the landing again and again and again. (with reloading.. takes some swift action when the flight is loaded).do it with and without a/p.. dozens of times.. eventually you become autodidact, and got it!

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I was wondering, though, do pilots often use ILS approaches and glide slopes to land, or is using that simply the easy way out?
Actually, even if an ILS is available to us, we choose to fly manually the ILS. That is, autopilot ILS mode is engaged, but the autopilot itself is not. So we follow the cues given to us by both the LOC and GS antennae and the Flight Director bars. We only do autolands when it is required to keep the airplane's CAT II/III capabilities current or in actual CAT II/III weather conditions per airline SOP (Standard Operating Procedures)
I believe I read somewhere a few years back that real world pilots are required to do a "hands on" approach and landing every (forgot the exact number) third or fourth time. The rest of the time they use ILS approaches if the airport is so equipped.
I think you mean IFR approaches. We have to do one IFR approach in real IMC (Instrument Meteorological Conditions) or simulated IMC every now and then (I think it is every 6 landings, I don't know, as that is FAA regulations and my country is not covered by those) to keep ourselves current.By the way, has the OP read the famous adagio "Any landing you can walk away from, is a good landing"?What makes a landing "nice" is setting the aircraft's mains on the proper touchdown point on the runway. The key is always the proper speed for the aircraft configuration. If you are at the proper speed when crossing the runway threshold (at 50ft height) and keep descending to flare height in a stabilised way, retard throttle levers and smoothly pitch up a few degrees and hold that attitude until touchdown. Flare too high and will lose airspeed, thus you will lose lift, thus you will lose height and the result will be a smackdown rather than a touchdown. Flare too low and the inertia carried by the aircraft will make the flaring action less effective and you will hit the planet instead of landing on it.The key is speed and proper flare action.Best regards

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Actually, even if an ILS is available to us, we choose to fly manually the ILS. That is, autopilot ILS mode is engaged, but the autopilot itself is not. So we follow the cues given to us by both the LOC and GS antennae and the Flight Director bars. We only do autolands when it is required to keep the airplane's CAT II/III capabilities current or in actual CAT II/III weather conditions per airline SOP (Standard Operating Procedures)I think you mean IFR approaches. We have to do one IFR approach in real IMC (Instrument Meteorological Conditions) or simulated IMC every now and then (I think it is every 6 landings, I don't know, as that is FAA regulations and my country is not covered by those) to keep ourselves current.By the way, has the OP read the famous adagio "Any landing you can walk away from, is a good landing"?What makes a landing "nice" is setting the aircraft's mains on the proper touchdown point on the runway. The key is always the proper speed for the aircraft configuration. If you are at the proper speed when crossing the runway threshold (at 50ft height) and keep descending to flare height in a stabilised way, retard throttle levers and smoothly pitch up a few degrees and hold that attitude until touchdown. Flare too high and will lose airspeed, thus you will lose lift, thus you will lose height and the result will be a smackdown rather than a touchdown. Flare too low and the inertia carried by the aircraft will make the flaring action less effective and you will hit the planet instead of landing on it.The key is speed and proper flare action.Best regards
When the real life pilots land, they don't have to pitch their noses down too much. How can I prevent myself from having to do a nosedive to land?

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When the real life pilots land, they don't have to pitch their noses down too much. How can I prevent myself from having to do a nosedive to land?
From that comment i seem to lean towards the fact that you are coming in way to fast if you are having to nosedive it to land.What are you flying at the moment? and at what speed do you approach? Just wondering as this information can definetly solve your problem.

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From that comment i seem to lean towards the fact that you are coming in way to fast if you are having to nosedive it to land.What are you flying at the moment? and at what speed do you approach? Just wondering as this information can definetly solve your problem.
I often fly the Boeing 737 and the Boeing 777, and I often try landing at speeds of 155-157 knots for both planes. I'm not ready to fly a B747 although I've landed the plane safely a couple of times. For that plane, I think I landed at 155 knots too. I've kissed the runway once, but that needed a nosedive.

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Weight has a significant effect on approach speed and altitude as well. Even planes as small as a King Air or Learjet have fuel tanks that could contain hundreds or thousands of pounds of fuel. With an unnecessary quantity of fuel in the tanks the plane needs more lift to follow the glide slope at the recommended flap setting. If the pilot attempts an approach at the recommended speed a higher angle of attack will be required to maintain glide slope and reach the touchdown point, impeding the pilot's ability to see the runway over the instrument panel. Furthermore, the higher weight and airspeed will result in a longer rollout requirement to get the plane slowed enough to turn onto the taxiway.Thus, unless you plan to fly a route approaching the plane's maximum range you will need to use the fuel and payload dialog to "fuel" the plane at some quantity less than the default 100%.

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You need to calculate the weight of the a/c at destination in order to achieve the correct Vat.So for each different a/c you fly you will need weight and Vref tables. There's no rule of thumb except for a/c of similar weight and configuration.Vololiberista

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