Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ga

ILS/Autoland CAT I/II/II any one have goods links for it

Recommended Posts

Ok Have read some post and links regarding diffrent Autolands/ILS CAT etc. Any one that can explane or have good links for it. 1. ILS/Autoland is diffrent?2. CAT I, II/ III fully autoland or whats the main diffrents... Must admint that I set up my plane for full autoland in the FMC on each flights tho, im the one that likes drinking my thea while flying :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think these topics are so extense that you should try to find information from real aviation sources.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a flight school called PPSC that closed and had very good material for the JAR ATPL sylabus. After the flightschool closed it was common for students to share some PDF's that contained all the information. I used to have those, but i cant find them anymore. Try googling PPSC ATPLYou can also buy oxford aviation jeppessen ATPL books. These are very detailed, and might be overkill for someone with no real world training. But if you are serious abuot aviation, by all means, get them. They are probably the best ATPL books out there. Flightschools all over Europe use them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok Have read some post and links regarding diffrent Autolands/ILS CAT etc. Any one that can explane or have good links for it. 1. ILS/Autoland is diffrent?2. CAT I, II/ III fully autoland or whats the main diffrents... Must admint that I set up my plane for full autoland in the FMC on each flights tho, im the one that likes drinking my thea while flying :D
Try this: http://forum.avsim.net/topic/343627-how-to-perform-an-autoland/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

he he , thx gents wil check the link out ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thx just the info I wer elooking for, ------------
  • Category I (CAT I) – A precision instrument approach and landing with a decision height not lower than 200 feet (61 m) above touchdown zone elevation and with either a visibility not less than 800 meters (2,600 ft) or a runway visual range not less than 550 meters (1,800 ft).
  • Category II (CAT II) – A precision instrument approach and landing with a decision height lower than 200 feet (61 m) above touchdown zone elevation but not lower than 100 feet (30 m), and a runway visual range not less than 300 meters (980 ft) for aircraft approach category A, B, C and not less than 350 meters (1,150 ft) for aircraft approach category D.
  • Category III (CAT III) is subdivided into three sections:
    • Category III A – A precision instrument approach and landing with:
      • a) a decision height lower than 100 feet (30 m) above touchdown zone elevation, or no decision height (alert height); and
      • cool.png a runway visual range not less than 200 meters (660 ft).

      [*]Category III B – A precision instrument approach and landing with:

      • a) a decision height lower than 50 feet (15 m) above touchdown zone elevation, or no decision height (alert height); and
      • cool.png a runway visual range less than 200 meters (660 ft) but not less than 75 meters (246 ft). Autopilot is used until taxi-speed. In the United States, FAA criteria for CAT III B runway visual range allows readings as low as 150 ft (46 m).

      [*]Category III C – A precision instrument approach and landing with no decision height and no runway visual range limitations. This category is not yet in operation anywhere in the world, as it requires guidance to taxi in zero visibility as well. "Category III C" is not mentioned in EU-OPS. Category III B is currently the best available system.

-------------------But what dos it means in short easy explenation thx;) that CATI you have to get closer to capture, or that some dos not support full autoland? CAT ICATIICATIII And how dos you know what the airport/RNW have of CAT, says on the charts/ask ATC?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found this easy info on the subject and answer my question can you guys confirm it ;)----"Cat I means that the approach can be flown in bad weather,Cat II means that it can be flown in worse weather (lower minimums), andCat III means that it can be flown in really crappy weather. Special aircraft and aircrew certification is required to use these."---

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are always 3 sources of minima.1. Jeppesen Minima (or whatever charting service you use)2. State minima (published in the AIS of the repective state, these are the absolute minima the state will allow you to use on CAT II/III approaches, f.e. France does not allow DH0 CAT III A/B approaches, it has an absolute minimum of DH203. Company minima, these might be imposed due to operational restrictions => published in company notams. Obviously the higher of the 3 always applies... To know wether a runway is CAT II/III => check chart 10-9 or the airport briefing charts in the section 1.3 Low Visibility OperationsAlso check notams wether the CAT II/III facilities are operationalAnd to perform any low vis aproach: Low Visibility Procedures MUST be in use at the respective airport!!(activation usually notified by ATIS, or respective controller)Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I heard at local ATC (app), and on liveATC, they inform pilot if CATII/III operations are effective at first contact. You can hear that info on ATIS too. They vector aircrafts to localizer first and when they get confirmation loc is captured, they give ILS clearance. At pilots side, on YT I saw they always like to turn AP off as soon as they see rwy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These categories are used to describe the different minima for precision approaches. CAT I precision approaches have the highest minima and CAT IIIc approaches have no minima. None of these have any direct bearing on autoland. An autoland system can conduct landings from a precision approach (i.e., ILS, GLS, etc.) regardless of the category of the precision approach. CAT I approaches may be hand-flown on raw data. CAT II and higher approaches require either an autoland system or a head-up guidance system. The HGS and fail passive autoland in the B737NG is certified to perform CAT IIIa approaches. The fail operational autoland is certified to perform CAT IIIb approaches. This means that if you turn on the HGS option in the NGX, you can actually hand-fly a CAT IIIa approach! (and this is actually done by some airlines). CAT IIIc approaches are currently not feasible as there is no way for the aircraft to taxi after landing! (At least, not until augmented GPS is good enough to guide the aircraft safely to the parking position) Cheers, DZ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Literally a "CAT" approach! Hahaha! Just be careful, the cat is now trying to program your FMC...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was able to find this I CAT approach...I'm not sure if it will help though. 263279_1980501071406_1209542524_31926240_1475010_n.jpg
That reminds me of my CAT! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...