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Daniel choen

How can i know the runway height and the temperature

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Hey folks,it was a very nice day yesterday at vatsim, full atc at the UK!.i have just 2 question which i think, will sounds very stupid, but i cant figure it up, how can i know what is the arrival runway height, and how can i now what is the temp out side when at cruise altitude.thanks in advance, nice regards, Daniel


Daniel choen

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Arrival runway altitude can be found in charts.For temperature outside you need a weather plan from some software, like ActiveSky.


--Peter Fabian 
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Arrival runway altitude can be found in charts.
It can even be found from inside your system... FIX page is your friend. It will output a generic ARP altitude if you just enter the ICAO, other than that it will even come up with TDZE once any specific runway is entered as well.As for temperature, do you need planning data? Because your question sounded like you did not, and for just knowing what the OAT is, have a glance at the upper DU. Other than that, PROG 2/2 will also provide some useful data, namely SAT as an addition to the regular TAT readout.sig.gif

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Etienne: never knew about the FIX page info. Thanks.as per temperature, I understood it so that you need that to input TOC temp in preflight?


--Peter Fabian 
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Could someone tell me the difference between OAT, SAT and TAT?Thanks!


Arjen Vandervelde

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OAT and SAT are the same thing (static/outside air temperature), Total Air Temperature is measured after stopping the air from speed (relative to the aircraft movement), a process that would heat the air up (change from kinetic to internal energy). Although it might seem counter-intuitive, this is the value for calculations of energy transfer between airplane and air mass, and for example it is used to determine icing conditions in flight.You might ask then, but why does wind feel colder than still air, this is a different process of body cooling.(please correct me if I am wrong, but this is how I understand it)


--Peter Fabian 
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I don't think your wrong, but it will very help, if someone can tell, how to calculate OAT for take off? thanks again , your very help me!


Daniel choen

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Hey folks,it was a very nice day yesterday at vatsim, full atc at the UK!.i have just 2 question which i think, will sounds very stupid, but i cant figure it up, how can i know what is the arrival runway height, and how can i now what is the temp out side when at cruise altitude.thanks in advance, nice regards, Daniel
TDZE --> charts. I'm sure they have them available on VATSIMTemp: On IVAO we have an ATIS. I'm pretty sure you have it on VATSIM too.Read the VATSIM docs. After that, if you haven't got the answer, ask their local training department.Bert Van Bulck

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TDZE --> charts. I'm sure they have them available on VATSIMTemp: On IVAO we have an ATIS. I'm pretty sure you have it on VATSIM too.Read the VATSIM docs. After that, if you haven't got the answer, ask their local training department.Bert Van Bulck
Hey, thanks, i am not mean to the temperature on landing or takeoff, i know i can get these by ATIS, i mean when the temperature starting to be minus at very high heights, thanks cheers mate.

Daniel choen

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Hey, thanks, i am not mean to the temperature on landing or takeoff, i know i can get these by ATIS, i mean when the temperature starting to be minus at very high heights, thanks cheers mate.
Hi Daniel! To add some clarity to the answers to your question already presented in the previous posts: there are actually two different temperatures that come into play for aircraft planning and flight,1. The first is the actual air temperature outside the aircraft at the altitude which you are currently flying is referred to as the Outside Air Temperature (OAT) or more commonly the Static Air Temperature (SAT). It is available to you on the NG at any time by accessing the PROG menu and moving to the page 2 display. You will see the SAT temp and also the deviation from Standard (ISA) temperature. This temperature will affect aircraft performance, e.g., warmer than standard temps will require higher true airspeed and hence a higher IAS and thus higher fuel consumption to attain a given Mach speed (since the speed of sound will therefore be faster), while colder than standard temps will result in an opposite scenario and thus better performance and fuel economy. When predicted temps at different altitudes are input into the CDU, it will allow the FMC to better predict fuel consumption as well as recommended airspeeds/machspeeds for a given Cost Index. Besides the advantage to preflight planning, however, it also can be the answer to observable anomalies in aircraft performance. For example, if the aircraft seems sluggish in climbs or takes a long time to reach cruise mach, you will probably find that it is due to a higher than standard SAT at the altitude you are flying. 2. The second important temperature is the temperature of the outside aircraft surface while in flight. It is this temperature that is used to determine the need for engine anti-icing (if visible moisture is also present). This temperature is actually a combination of the SAT (or OAT) explained above and the increased heat caused by the compression of the air due to the forward speed of the aircraft. This temperature is known as the Total Air Temperature (TAT) or Ram Air Temperature (RAT). On the NG it is displayed on the Outboard PFD and labeled TAT.Hope this adds clarity rather than confusion, Daniel. BTW, the SAT and the TAT will be the same when the aircraft is stationary on the ground.

Craig Williams

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Hi Daniel! To add some clarity to the answers to your question already presented in the previous posts: there are actually two different temperatures that come into play for aircraft planning and flight,1. The first is the actual air temperature outside the aircraft at the altitude which you are currently flying is referred to as the Outside Air Temperature (OAT) or more commonly the Static Air Temperature (SAT). It is available to you on the NG at any time by accessing the PROG menu and moving to the page 2 display. You will see the SAT temp and also the deviation from Standard (ISA) temperature. This temperature will affect aircraft performance, e.g., warmer than standard temps will require higher true airspeed and hence a higher IAS and thus higher fuel consumption to attain a given Mach speed (since the speed of sound will therefore be faster), while colder than standard temps will result in an opposite scenario and thus better performance and fuel economy. When predicted temps at different altitudes are input into the CDU, it will allow the FMC to better predict fuel consumption as well as recommended airspeeds/machspeeds for a given Cost Index. Besides the advantage to preflight planning, however, it also can be the answer to observable anomalies in aircraft performance. For example, if the aircraft seems sluggish in climbs or takes a long time to reach cruise mach, you will probably find that it is due to a higher than standard SAT at the altitude you are flying.2. The second important temperature is the temperature of the outside aircraft surface while in flight. It is this temperature that is used to determine the need for engine anti-icing (if visible moisture is also present). This temperature is actually a combination of the SAT (or OAT) explained above and the increased heat caused by the compression of the air due to the forward speed of the aircraft. This temperature is known as the Total Air Temperature (TAT) or Ram Air Temperature (RAT). On the NG it is displayed on the Outboard PFD and labeled TAT.Hope this adds clarity rather than confusion, Daniel. BTW, the SAT and the TAT will be the same when the aircraft is stationary on the ground.
thanks, that really helped, cheers mate.

Daniel choen

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