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Crosswind Landing Technique?

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I have just about got my manual landing down fairly well but for one thing. I am landing under conditions practically non existant in the real word, that is with no winds. So now i want to start getting this bird on the ground under more realistic conditions.Is there any set rules, depending on wind speed, direction or both that apply when landing in a cross wind. For instance, do you use yaw? Or do you use roll? Or a combination of both. Or is it a matter of preference from pilot to pilot?I'd be interested to hear from some of you veteran simmers or maybe some RW pilots.


Rick Hobbs

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Crosswind landing techniques are explained fully in the Flight Crew Training Manual, section 6.52. (Crosswind takeoff is in section 3.15)You may want to search for "737 crosswind landing," or, "airliner crosswind landing" on youtube. There you will find many aircraft spotting videos that will help you visualize what you need to be doing. As they say, "a picture speaks a thousand words." Therefore a video must speak volumes!

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basically there´s two different techniques: You can crab into the wind, and descend with your nose pointing "into the wind" and away from the rwy centerline. You´ll have to kick the rudder pedals and straighten yourself out as you flare.Another technique, the one I personally favor in the RW (I don´t fly NGs though) is to roll the airplane into the wind (that is, keep the upwind wing lower than he downwind wing) and use rudder inputs to control acft track.


Cheers,
Victor M. Lima
 

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Crab into the wind.During flare: de-crab using rudder and lower the downwind wing. So you end up landing on 1 wheel.Bert Van Bulck

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Another technique, the one I personally favor in the RW (I don´t fly NGs though) is to roll the airplane into the wind (that is, keep the upwind wing lower than he downwind wing) and use rudder inputs to control acft track.
That's perfectly fine for student pilots to maintain a side-slip all the way in, but considered poor technique for anyone above that level, especially carrying passengers.As Bert mentioned, crab into the wind. That is: aircraft's longitudinal axis (tail to nose) pointed slightly towards the direction of wind while direction of flight is to either side, wings level. At around <20ft firmly but smoothly transition into a side-slip. Longitudinal axis parallel to direction of flight (the runway in this case) and upwind wing lower, upwind wheel contacting the runway first. AKA the "kick out method".
I didnt think you were supposed to use the rudder to de-crab with a large jet like the 737 NG.
Common technique.From the manual:
6.53*** Sideslip only (zero crab) landings are not recommended with crosswind components in excess of 17 knots at flaps 15, 20 knots at flaps 30, or 23 knots at flaps 40. This recommendation ensures adequate ground clearance and is based on maintaining adequate control margin.
Notice ground clearance is the only concern for no crab landings.EDIT: I forgot. You can side-slip like I mentioned, but it's actually more likely and preferable to touch down both main wheels simultaneously with the kick out method.

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When using the crab-kick method of crosswind landing in a large aircraft it's important to keep your sight line on final on the upwind side of the runway thus keeping the main wheels centered over the pavement. The point around which the aircraft rotates is well behind you. If your sight line is aligned with the runway center line you will find yourself on the downwind side of the runway when you take the crab out.


Joe Diamond

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Crab into the wind.During flare: de-crab using rudder and lower the downwind wing. So you end up landing on 1 wheel.Bert Van Bulck
Best and most simple explanation Bert!

Tony Fontaine

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Many thanks guys for all your advice. So it seems that the favourite (or correct) method is to crab and i assume you use roll purely for leveling the wings. Have i got that right?


Rick Hobbs

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That's perfectly fine for student pilots to maintain a side-slip all the way in, but considered poor technique for anyone above that level, especially carrying passengers.
Well, I´m not a student pilot anymore although I have precious few hours, and I see a lot of people, myself included doing this in my local airport. I had no idea it was considered poor technique. Maybe this is a cultural thing and down South it doesn´t apply for GA? I have to agree though, that I don´t see the heavies doing this. As a matter of fact even the autopilot crabs the airplane during Xwind approaches, according to a family member of mine who flies the 777.

Cheers,
Victor M. Lima
 

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Crab into the wind.During flare: de-crab using rudder and lower the downwind wing. So you end up landing on 1 wheel.Bert Van Bulck
The "Chinese Landing" (One Wing Low) is used on smaller planes. The Boeing FCTM has us landing wings level. I guess the idea is that you don't drift that much during the flare.(You lower the upwind wing on smaller planes, don't you?)

Matt Cee

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The "Chinese Landing" (One Wing Low) is used on smaller planes. The Boeing FCTM has us landing wings level. I guess the idea is that you don't drift that much during the flare.(You lower the upwind wing on smaller planes, don't you?)
Obviously Matt. Dislexia... thanks for clarifying

Cheers,
Victor M. Lima
 

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Well, I´m not a student pilot anymore although I have precious few hours, and I see a lot of people, myself included doing this in my local airport. I had no idea it was considered poor technique. Maybe this is a cultural thing and down South it doesn´t apply for GA? I have to agree though, that I don´t see the heavies doing this. As a matter of fact even the autopilot crabs the airplane during Xwind approaches, according to a family member of mine who flies the 777.
A lot of the reason comes down to the geometry of the airplane. Some swept wing jets don't have a lot of ground clearance. Lowering a wing in the flare increases the possibility of dragging a flap, engine pod or wingtip on the runway. The nose up attitude on landing will reduce the wingtip clearance even more.

Joe Diamond

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Well, I´m not a student pilot anymore although I have precious few hours, and I see a lot of people, myself included doing this in my local airport. I had no idea it was considered poor technique. Maybe this is a cultural thing and down South it doesn´t apply for GA? I have to agree though, that I don´t see the heavies doing this. As a matter of fact even the autopilot crabs the airplane during Xwind approaches, according to a family member of mine who flies the 777.
I wouldn't worry, it's a rather sweeping statement to say it's bad technique. Afterall unless you're actually landing crabbed, EVERY cross wind landing should be made with crossed controls, it's only the point you transition from crab to wing down that changes. Depending on the circumstances, you might want to make that transition early (night for example).

Jordan Forrest

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