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smokeyupahead

Boeing 737 ng...which class aircraft?

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In the FCTM is says that a 737-800 can be either B or C. I think it depends on how much load you carry with you.

Heavy, I think - the 738 and 739 at leastOr should that be large?
It's for sure not a heavy. Not even the 757 is an heavy. An A330 or B767 would be one.

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According to both vroute.premium and simroutes.com it's a heavy - I'm not an airline pilot so I really have no idea! Just trying to helpbut I guess at c. 140k av takeof weight it's not that big at all

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If you are talking about "category", not "class", here's some info:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_approach_category

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It's not considered a heavy. It and the -900 are narrow body aircraft. As was stated earlier, even the 757 is considered a narrow body.

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HiWhat do the minimums (decision height) ona achart refer to? Are they refered to weight or speed? I'm a little confused...Thank you guys for all the imput!
I'm probably one of the less experienced simmers in this forum, but I remember in one of Just Planes movies, pilot was making decission what category of aircraft is he, based on his Vapp or Vref.If you think about it, it makes sense, because speed determines, for example, how much time you have from passing minimum height and hitting ground (approach angle is constant). Thus having different minima for different category aircrafts gives about the same time for each of them to safely perform go-around.Maybe someone will correct me here.

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It's NOT a heavy. A heavy has a maximum takeoff weight of 255,000 lbs or greater.It is cat B or C, sometimes even D, check the FCOM

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No 737 is a "heavy." 757-300 is, -200 is not. 737 approach category is normally C with a few exceptions. Check your local regs.

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I'm probably one of the less experienced simmers in this forum, but I remember in one of Just Planes movies, pilot was making decission what category of aircraft is he, based on his Vapp or Vref.If you think about it, it makes sense, because speed determines, for example, how much time you have from passing minimum height and hitting ground (approach angle is constant). Thus having different minima for different category aircrafts gives about the same time for each of them to safely perform go-around.Maybe someone will correct me here.
Quite right : it;s an approach performance categorie :Catagory A = Speed less than 91 knotsCatagory B = Speed >= 91 and less than 121 knotsCatagory C = Speed >= 121 and less than 141 knotsCatagory D = Speed >= 141 and less than 166 knotsCatagory E = Speed >= 166 knots (only includes certain military aircraft)

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Quite right : it;s an approach performance categorie :Catagory A = Speed less than 91 knotsCatagory B = Speed >= 91 and less than 121 knotsCatagory C = Speed >= 121 and less than 141 knotsCatagory D = Speed >= 141 and less than 166 knotsCatagory E = Speed >= 166 knots (only includes certain military aircraft)
Fully correct !

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Guys these speeds would be for a flap 40 landing, right?Let's say I'm landing @ 144 knots (cat.D) flaps 35 and the fmc calculated speed for a full flap landing is 136 knots (cat.C), would one normally opt for lower approach speeds and higher minimums or prefer higher approach speeds in a flap 35 cfg.? I know that choice would also be subject to winds and runway conditions but I'm talking about light wind and clean runway conditions.

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Guys these speeds would be for a flap 40 landing, right?Let's say I'm landing @ 144 knots (cat.D) flaps 35 and the fmc calculated speed for a full flap landing is 136 knots (cat.C), would one normally opt for lower approach speeds and higher minimums or prefer higher approach speeds in a flap 35 cfg.? I know that choice would also be subject to winds and runway conditions but I'm talking about light wind and clean runway conditions.
You would be catagory D since you always add 5 knots to your calculated Vref. 136 + 5 = 141 = cat D (BTW there's no flaps 35 blum.gif )

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You would be catagory D since you always add 5 knots to your calculated Vref. 136 + 5 = 141 = cat D (BTW there's no flaps 35 blum.gif )
Hahaha! You caught me! :( ...flap 30 of course.What if the speeds were one in the C and one in the D category, would one always land the NG with flaps 30 on a long runway?Sorry guys I'm not trying to be obsessive or anything like that I just want to know what the real world procedures are like...

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Actually, the standard flaps setting on approach is 30. 40 can be used but results in a lot more noise and fuel consumption (because more drag)Oh, and also there's a greater tendency to "balloon" since the attitude is much more nose up at flaps 40.

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So on a standard approach/landing what flap settings are normally used ? Im using 30 at the moment but should I be using less ? Sorry to barge in.Andy Blake

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The approach category is based on the maximum certificated landing weight of the aircraft. It does not change for a particular approach. A category C aircraft is always a category C aircraft regardless of the actual speed flown during the approach.For a circling approach it's a little different. Since the size of the protected area is based on the speed of the aircraft a category C aircraft flying a circling approach at a speed above 140 should use the category D minimums to ensure it remains within the protected airspace.That's why Jeppesen does not use the ABCD labels on the circling minimus but instead lists a max speed value in the minimums table.

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The approach category is based on the maximum certificated landing weight of the aircraft. It does not change for a particular approach. A category C aircraft is always a category C aircraft regardless of the actual speed flown during the approach.For a circling approach it's a little different. Since the size of the protected area is based on the speed of the aircraft a category C aircraft flying a circling approach at a speed above 140 should use the category D minimums to ensure it remains within the protected airspace.That's why Jeppesen does not use the ABCD labels on the circling minimus but instead lists a max speed value in the minimums table.
...The answer I was looking for, now it has just become a little clearer to me! Thanks!

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Because 757 is a narrow body jet.
I think that in the USA the 757 is sometimes considered to be a "Heavy" because it produces a lot of wake turbulence and therefore ATC have to increase spacing behind it as they would for a heavy.

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Actually, the standard flaps setting on approach is 30. 40 can be used but results in a lot more noise and fuel consumption (because more drag)Oh, and also there's a greater tendency to "balloon" since the attitude is much more nose up at flaps 40.
Remember though, if visibility is marginal, you should use flap 40 anyways, not to lower the minimums, but because the lower pitch attitude increases forward visibility.... [At least that was the thinking back in 1989....]Capt. Rónán O Cadhain.

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I think that in the USA the 757 is sometimes considered to be a "Heavy" because it produces a lot of wake turbulence and therefore ATC have to increase spacing behind it as they would for a heavy.
Only the 757-300 will have the HEAVY designation. As stated numerous times in this thread. The -200 is, however, treated like a heavy as you mentioned; for separation.We can go deeper and include the very few -200s that have "waivers" to exceed 255,000lbs. In which case obviously they can have the Heavy in their callsign.In review: -200s will not have heavy in their callsign.

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