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Driver170

Raw data sanity checks!

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Ok just done tutorial 2 and have a question about the above title! Who here does sanity checks for RNAV SID's and are they needed and when else would you do it

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Airline SOPs usually require raw-data backup, if available.

 

There may or may not be navaids available. Typically you'd use raw-data backup on SIDs, STARs and approaches.

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Ok thanks but how in earth am i meant to carry out that procedure like in tutorial 2 its so complicated how would i began to plan something like that?

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Ok just done tutorial 2 and have a question about the above title!

 

Driver170

 

Please sign your full name per these Forum Rules http://forum.avsim.net/topic/361816-pmdg-forum-rules-please-read-before-posting/.

 

To have your signature automatically attached to your post do this. Left click on your user name in the upper right of this page. On the next page left click on Edit my Profile. On the next page left click on Signature and on the next page in the box under Edit Signature enter your full name and left click on Save Changes. Now your name will be on every post you make.

 

Thank you.

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Ok thanks but how in earth am i meant to carry out that procedure like in tutorial 2 its so complicated how would i began to plan something like that?

 

Many RNAV procedures do not have the proper data on the charts to be able check the raw data any more.

 

It's only the old ANAV charts (that would could actually fly using /A-type equipment) that will have the necessary information for sanity checks.

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Ok thanks but how in earth am i meant to carry out that procedure like in tutorial 2 its so complicated how would i began to plan something like that?

 

 

Guess that's why it's in tutorial #2 and not in #1!   :lol:

 

Some simmers are thirsty for knowledge; PMDG want to advertise their brand new terrain on ND, and a lot of simmers have started feeling bored by the straightforward stuff.

 

The NGX tutorial #2 really fulfils some people's needs.   :smile:

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>Some simmers are thirsty for knowledge.

 

When I was teaching an initial pilot training class on the B-717 (I was working for Boeing), I had an eager student who came up to me after his training was over said to me:

 

"Ralph, when I came to initial pilot training, I was thirsty for knowledge. However, I didn't know you guys were going to wrap my lips around a fire hydrant and turn it on full blast!".

 

For those of you who may be interested to know what it takes to get through a 5 week initial pilot training program for a major carrier on a plane similar to the 737NGX:

 

1. Training is officially Monday through Friday (for 5 weeks).

 

2. Ground school is automated so you can go at your own pace and hours (its open 24 hours) but you'll have to get through it within 2 weeks including of course passing all the tests on all the systems.

 

3. The level D sim sessions are 4 hours each with 2 students. The session is actually 2 hours because the Captain will fly the first 2 hour training session and then the F/O will fly the same 2 hour training session. Each pilot gets a chance to observe and help the other.

 

4. Depending on the how the course was written and approved by the FAA, you'll receive any where from 20 to 24 4 hour sim training sessions.

 

5. You will need (on average) to put in 12 hour days studying including your 4 hour sim sessions. When you're not in the sim, you will be pouring over the FCOM1 and FCOM2 manuals, the QRH and the Trainging manual. You will be closer to these 4 books than you ever dreamed you would be.

 

6. You will need to work Sat continuing your studies. You'll need to put in a 6 day week to get through the training successfully. Remember, it's taken you a very long time to finally get into a new hire class, so the last thing you want to do is fail your check ride. Because of this, all of my students worked their butts off and put in really long hours to get through the course. And they all did!

 

7. I always told my students to take Sundays off. Do something else to clear your mind and come back on Monday refreshed and ready to go.

 

And finally, the pressure is enormous and the stakes are high. Every minute of your 12 hour study days are full. There is no spare time really, for most students. Most feel like they are barely able to tread water, just barely able to keep their heads above the water line.

 

So, if any of you are headed for a new hire class, congratulations and that's about what you can expect! So be prepared, be rested and good luck to you!!

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