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Driver170

LEST ILS app chart help

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Came across this approach chart on navigraph - LEST ILS Z rwy 35 VOR/DME

 

I was shooting a CAT I but seen ILS 4.0 % and ILS 2.5 % and wasn't sure what this mean't or what one to select? Is something to do with gradient?

 

I decided for C 1430 minimums ILS 4.0%

 

Also why does it meantion VOR/DME when its an ILS?

 

Thanks.

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The 4% and 2% are just missed approach climb gradients. The approach can be done with VOR/DME and no ILS.

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Lower performance climb gradients require earlier missed approach in order to remain clear of obstacles during the missed app. You need to be higher off the ground when you commence the missed approach. So 2,5 requires a higher minimum than 4,0. Understand?

 

As for VOR mentioned.. You can see that Z or Y use different ground based navigation aids for the missed approach procedure. ILS 35 Y uses NDB and 35 Z uses VOR. 

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Note I have not looked at the chart in question but ILS (precision approach - glide slope) mins will most always be lower than VOR (non-precsion - no glide slope).  ILS mins normally 200agl, VOR mins normally about 500agl

 

James

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The approach can be done with VOR/DME and no ILS.

 

Negative. It is an ILS approach. ILS 35 Z VOR/DME does not mean that you can fly this approach as a VOR approach.  

 

However, if the glide slope is OTS, we can fly the Localizer+DME with the published minimums for that ...

 

The "VOR/DME" is the nav aids required for the missed approach procedure on this ILS approach.

 

Wanna fly the VOR approach? Then you would have to look at the VOR 35 approach chart.

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Thanks that makes sense! So with an A/C like the 737 i use, i can opt for the 4.0% then? So i was right in choosen that minimum?

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Lol. That all depends on your specific performance that day. Weight, temperature, one engine out(!?) :) Complex. But i'd say you're good to go (don't sue me :lol: ) 

 

An example:   4 % x 160 knots ground speed = 640 ft/min (required climb rate)

                      2.5 % x 160 knots ground speed = 400 ft/min

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Brilliant thanks! Just trying to understand some of these charts, it can be a right pain lol

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Brilliant thanks! Just trying to understand some of these charts, it can be a right pain lol

I hear you, keep on asking :) 

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Got another one

 

ENSB ILS rwy 10 chart on any chart really, you have a T next to the degrees? EG 315* T

 

Does this mean true heading or something

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Ahh thoughtso magnetic variation or something.

 

I've got all the oxford aviation books complete 7 for the PPL prob find more about it in there!

 

Looking at the airlaw book, don't think we'll need to know most of that lol

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The reason for including true is that the magnetic inclination, or dip angle, at ENSB is 82.2. Making a magnetic compass possibly unreliable and erratic.

 

You're correct that the difference betweeen True and Magnetic is the variation (declination).

 


Looking at the airlaw book, don't think we'll need to know most of that lol

 

:lol: Yeah, for flight simulation purposes, you can skip a lot of chapters. Helps with the overall understanding of things though. 

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Hi can you help with this -

 

FCTM

 

Low Visibility Approaches

A working knowledge of approach lighting systems and regulations as they apply to the required visual references is essential to safe and successful approaches. Touchdown RVR is normally controlling for Category I, II, and III approaches. For Category I and II approaches, mid and rollout RVR are normally advisory. For Category III operations mid and rollout RVR may be controlling. In some countries, visibility is used instead of RVR. Approval from the regulatory agency is required to use visibility rather than RVR.

 

 

Can you explain what MID and ROLLOUT RVR mean please?

 

Also controlling and advisory?

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RVR is measured by visibility sensors. This document shows how they can be located: http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Order/6560.10C.pdf

 

A controlling RVR means the reported value of an RVR reporting location (touchdown, mid-point and stop-end) used to determine whether operating minima are, or are not, met.

http://www.casa.gov.au/wcmswr/_assets/main/download/caaps/ops/lvo-1.pdf

 

Advisory RVR just for additional information gives visibility in other runway locations, decisions to clear for approach and land would be made regardless of it.

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Not sure I see the problem, but if you mean on the approach plates, it is right there.

 

EDDH ILS 23:

 

m3geTr7.jpg

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HRCLL = High Instensity Runway Center Line Lights

HREDL = High Intensity Runway Edge Light

Multiple RVR means you have available RVR for near, middle and far end of runway.

 

The more lights and the more RVR information available = lower minimums.

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Thanks bud clears that up :) makes sense now.

 

Looking to learn a new skill. At EGPH taking off on rwy 24 you have to entry points for the rwy at the end. In rw i have seen a few a/c using the second one from the end, my explanation is because there light and don't need the full length. But how do pilots work this out? Or does the dispatch or something tells them?

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