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Ray Proudfoot

FSLabs Concorde-X. Helsinki to Anchorage via North Pole

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Following a lengthy discussion here about how close aircraft can fly to the poles I decided to take FS Labs' Concorde-X on a hop from Helsinki, Finland to Anchorage, Alaska and test the rules. Fortunately Concorde with its INS navigation system uses TRUE headings, not magnetic so in theory passing close to the pole would not cause a problem.

 

You may think this a strange route but Concorde's range of 4000nm does limit what routes it can take and as I wanted to get close to the pole this was a suitable one that would allow the aircraft to fly supersonic at both the departure and arrival ends without having to worry about laying a sonic boom across populated areas.

 

Here's the route flown. Note how long it appears because of map distortion. I changed FSX's date to 23 September to negate the effect of earth tilt. I departed Helsinki at 15:30 local time and arrived in Anchorage around 08:30 local - 7 hours gained!

 

Concorde_EFHK-PANC.png

 

With 88,000Kgs of fuel runway 33 was a little short for departure but I managed it - just. Reheats are engaged - they're just hidden by the viewing angle.

 

EFHK_Rotate.png

 

I captured this shot as the aircraft left Norway behind enroute to Spitsbergen, the last land before Alaska.

 

Conc_SunMoon.png

 

As Concorde reached its most northerly point - 88° 39' N I took this shot. If you look carefully you can see a ground texture area. Where this reaches a point (not visible) lies the North Pole. It's hard to describe the isolation being this far north and so far from land.

 

Concorde_8835N.png

 

At FL590 - over 13 miles above the Earth's surface the curvature of the Earth is visible. This was also the case in the real world.

 

Concorde_EarthCurvature.png

 

Another shot taken at FL590 with the sun glinting off the fuselage...

 

Concorde_Sun.png

 

The famous passenger flight info display that many lucky people had their photos taken by...

 

Concorde_PassInfo.png

 

It takes just 25 minutes to descend from FL590 to 12,000ft for the approach and landing. Here's the approach. Note the high angle of attack. Concorde didn't have flaps so the only way to slow the aircraft was to angle the delta wing to act as a brake. The droop nose allows the pilots to see the runway.

 

Concorde_PANC_Landing.png

 

Parked at Anchorage after a flight of 3hr 40m covering 3,486nm.

 

Concorde_PANC_Parked.png

 

Hope you enjoy the shots. :smile:

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Very cool flight, would you mind posting your flight plan route, I might give this a try.

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Kacper, make sure the navigation stays in TRUE mode, not magnetic or things will go crazy.


Very cool flight, would you mind posting your flight plan route, I might give this a try.

 

Mark,

 

Here you are...

 

ROVIL M854 ABOVA T95 UXUKU DCT HMF DCT 7600N02146E 8000N01925E 8400N01350E 87N000E 8835N06000W 87N120W 83N141W DCT SCC J115 CQR J155 ENN J125 TAGER TAGER7

 

I changed FSX date to 23 Sept so the Earth's tilt was negated. Otherwise it's all dark at this time of year.

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I think if you try the same destination from Stockholm, you get slightly nearer the pole.

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I think if you try the same destination from Stockholm, you get slightly nearer the pole.

 

Sadly not. The great circle route would result in a path further away from the pole. Moscow - Anchorage would be very close but that is further than Concorde's range of 4000nm.

 

Ultimately Helsinki was the best option.

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