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chintzo

I guess it was the left engine then!

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I'm cruising at 21000 feet in my JS41, the passengers are fed and watered and all is well. When fspax decides to throw a spanner in the works or engine as it happens.

Red warning light and right engine high oil temp annunciator is lit. I figured the best option was to reduce no.2 and increase no.1 , until it cooled down. How wrong was I.

No.1 shut itself down and my initial thoughts were on the lines of 'oh dear' or something similar. I feathered no.1 happily pleased with myself that I hadn't done the same to no.2. (I don't know how to restart in the air)

Whilst descending to a suitable airfield I had time to reflect on what went wrong. It turns out the right engine high temp oil light is actually on the right side of the panel. The left engine light is on the left but labelled with an R. When it illuminated I zoomed in to read what fault I had and took immediate action. It hadn't occurred to me that an engineer in the instrument shop had made the error and built the panel wrong.

After a safe landing and sending the aircraft to maintenance all is well. Although fspax has charged me $1,000,000 for repairs and they haven't fixed the light.

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The left engine light is on the left but labelled with an R.

 

That's a gotcha' just waiting to happen.... yes, that could happen to me.

 

When learning multiengine, most of which is dealing with a dead one out there, I was taught to slap the thigh of the leg that wasn't pushing rudder... then the saying "dead leg dead engine" is said out loud before pulling the plug on it... really works. I've had two different occasions to slap my thigh and utter those words very thankful for the lesson. Of course it helps to actually feel the yaw but in the simulator you step on the ball if you are using rudder pedals and it all comes back.

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Great idea slapping your thigh. Although I think I still had the autopilot engaged at the time so I wouldn't of known about the rudder. Landing was surprisingly easy with full right rudder. Remembering to straighten up before the nose wheel touches down.

We had an unfortunate air accident near where I live which involved a 737. I believe that the working engine was shut down whilst the one on fire was doing all the work. Maybe the pilot should of slapped his leg and they might of made the runway.

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What a way to discover a little error. Who would ever have noticed this? Thank you Roy for sharing this and Dan, for the "dead leg dead engine" lesson. I don't think many of us "armchair pilots" know about this method.

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We had an unfortunate air accident near where I live which involved a 737. I believe that the working engine was shut down whilst the one on fire was doing all the work. Maybe the pilot should of slapped his leg and they might of made the runway.

 

British Midland 1989 Kegworth? Pilots misidentified the malfunctioning engine and shutdown the healthy one. But because they simultaneously throttled back the dying engine, it seemed to cure the problems. During the later stages of approach they needed more power and the bad engine then died on them, resulting in the ensuing crash.

 

Had there been an engine fire they'd have shutdown the correct one, but there weren't any warnings apart from the vibration indicator (which was criticised in the accident report for being the size of a 20p coin) and bad smells and shaking in the cockpit.

 

I like that "dead-leg, dead-engine", I must remember it!

 

Can't say I'd ever noticed that the engine warning light was mislabelled, might see if I can correct that in mine. Good spot!

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British Midland 1989 Kegworth?

 

First thing I thought of, actually.

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Can't say I'd ever noticed that the engine warning light was mislabelled, might see if I can correct that in mine. Good spot!

I'd never noticed it either. It's quite easy to copy and paste an isolated "L" from another warning legend bmp in Photoshop, but not sure if the EULA allows it. Hopefully as it's done in the right spirit it would be allowed.

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I'd never noticed it either. It's quite easy to copy and paste an isolated "L" from another warning legend bmp in Photoshop, but not sure if the EULA allows it. Hopefully as it's done in the right spirit it would be allowed.

Well I wasn't planning on uploading it tbh, for the aforementioned legal reasons it would be my personal use only.

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First thing I thought of, actually.

That would be the one.

 

It seems a shame to leave this unfixed but I've no doubt your guys are very busy and updates to the J41 would be bottom of the list. Obviously any update has to be officially sanctioned, not just randomly uploaded to a dropbox. What if a user modified BMP was sent in and checked before being released through official channels?

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It seems a shame to leave this unfixed

 

I'd be surprised if this were a bug.  This plane was Robert's home for thousands of hours, I would be surprised if something like this got past him.  I just assume that, like several other features in this airplane, the user interface was not as intuitive as most modern designs. 

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I'd be surprised if this were a bug.  This plane was Robert's home for thousands of hours, I would be surprised if something like this got past him.  I just assume that, like several other features in this airplane, the user interface was not as intuitive as most modern designs. 

It's not a software bug, it's a graphical error. The lettering on the left eng oil high temp warning light says R OIL HI TEMP, the light is illuminating correctly for a left engine problem. The AOM confirms the caption should read L OIL HI TEMP. It's the kind of thing that's very easy to miss in testing. No one seems to have noticed it until now.

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Sonofagun... I'll try to remember this when if/when we start the JS41 testing again.  Thanks.

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