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teopereira

About the use of the rudder on the 737 NG...

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To make a coordinated turn and therefore 'keep the ball in the middle' in a Cessna 152 or 172 for example, when one banks the ailerons concurrently adequate rudder pressure needs to be be applied by the pilot flying. Is this the same with the 737 NG? When manually banking the 737, does the aircraft automatically apply the rudder or the should the pilot apply the rudder to make a coordinated turn?

*

I've been noting that I have to input some rudder on the NGX to make coordinated turns... I don't know whether rudder input is needed in the real aircraft...

 

Thanks!


Teo Halfen

 

Windows 10 Pro 64 bits, P3D V4, GTX 1080 Asus Strix, i7 4790K, Asus Maximus VII Hero, H100i, Hd SSD 240 Gb, Corsair Vengeance 16Gb 2400Mhz

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No need. The plane has a yaw damper to help the spoilers and ailerons keep you straight.

 

From takeoff to flare, your feet can be on the floor.


Matt Cee

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except cross wind landing :)


Andre Malishkin

 

- I am not a real pilot, but i did stay at holiday inn express -

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Wait... this thing has a rudder?! :-D

 

except cross wind landing :)

Actually even then. I don't personally like it, but there's some castering built into the mains and Boeing says you can land it in a crab. And actually, especially with the new winglets, you're forced to do so at least partially, given a strong enough wind.


Andrew Crowley

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And you can, of course, still use rudders in the NGX, but their effectiveness will be imited by the rudder ratio protection, in order to avoid dangerous stress to the tail surfaces if used at higher speeds.

 

OTOH, PMDG NGX and 777 react in a very unrealistic way to situations where rudder would really have to be used. I know about the FBW compensations in the 777, but failling an engine after V1 or during initial climb in the NGX has practically no effect in yaw and roll - a rather unrealistic modeling of the reality under such circumstances - maybe a compromise, given that the core flight dynamics used by PMDGs are still those of MSFS / P3D anyway...

 

Performing a believable sideslip or fwslip is also less than realistic...


Don't know, but to me MFS looks a lot like the "Barbie" of desktop flight simulation...

Doesn't matter - I like to play with Barbies...

 

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From takeoff to flare, your feet can be on the floor.

 

Reminds me of the instructor I had for my Commercial/Instrument and MEL work at the Offutt AFB aero club, Clyde.  Clyde had at least 12,000 hrs in tankers, and he took special joy in taking very experience pilots up for their first encounters with a GA airplane mostly because they didn't know how to use the rudder.  He was a really good instructor.


Dan Downs KCRP

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