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oscarduran10

I7 6700k better overclocker?

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I wouldn't bet on it. Maybe after delidding, but not out of the box, that's what I have been reading. Same Intel story as always, you could get a good CPU or a dud, overclocking-wise.

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I just bought one and got mine stable @ 4.7 GHz and from what I heard most 6700Ks will do 4.6-4.7 but as always of course you could get lucky and get a golden chip that will do 5 GHz...or not so lucky and get one that won't do more than 4.5...

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In my experience with de-lidding, if you're willing to take advantage of the additional temperature headroom afforded by the procedure you can usually get an extra 100-200MHz more than whatever the average OC is that most people end up at.  Also, with i7 you can *sometimes* get a further 100MHz by disabling HyperThreading.  Sometimes all this buys you is a little lower temps/voltage though.  

 

My first de-lidded chip, an i7 3770k would hit 4.7GHz before being de-lidded and afterwards it would do 4.9GHz, also with HT disabled.  The 4770k that replaced it would do 4.6Ghz before de-lidding and 4.8GHz after, this time with HT enabled.  My current 4790k I have not tested before and after but it does 5GHz with HT enabled and the lowest voltage of all 3 de-lidded processors I have owned.  I have de-lidded a number of chips for other people and overclocked them, though usually to much lower values in an effort to keep the chips running as long as possible.  

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I just bought one and got mine stable @ 4.7 GHz and from what I heard most 6700Ks will do 4.6-4.7 but as always of course you could get lucky and get a golden chip that will do 5 GHz...or not so lucky and get one that won't do more than 4.5...

Yep, Asus tested a bunch of them and decided that on average 4.7 was about what to expect.

 

Silicon lottery considered of course. That's for this batch, future batches may be different.

 

 

In my experience with de-lidding, if you're willing to take advantage of the additional temperature headroom afforded by the procedure you can usually get an extra 100-200MHz more than whatever the average OC is that most people end up at.  Also, with i7 you can *sometimes* get a further 100MHz by disabling HyperThreading.  Sometimes all this buys you is a little lower temps/voltage though.  

 

My first de-lidded chip, an i7 3770k would hit 4.7GHz before being de-lidded and afterwards it would do 4.9GHz, also with HT disabled.  The 4770k that replaced it would do 4.6Ghz before de-lidding and 4.8GHz after, this time with HT enabled.  My current 4790k I have not tested before and after but it does 5GHz with HT enabled and the lowest voltage of all 3 de-lidded processors I have owned.  I have de-lidded a number of chips for other people and overclocked them, though usually to much lower values in an effort to keep the chips running as long as possible.

I'll be building a Sylake system in a month or so. The fact that delidding equates to just a few hundred megahertz more and thus minimal frame rate improvement is something I've been contemplating.

 

In view of this, I may not bother delidding. The temps will be lower and thus less degradation, but given that degradation isn't really a consideration in regard to how long I'll have the CPU, probably won't bother.

 

Another advantage of not delidding is that the CPU warranty will be still in place, along with Intel's performance tuning plan, so overclocking insurance intact.

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Yep, Asus tested a bunch of them and decided that on average 4.7 was about what to expect.

 

Silicon lottery considered of course. That's for this batch, future batches may be different.

 

 

 

I'll be building a Sylake system in a month or so. The fact that delidding equates to just a few hundred megahertz more and thus minimal frame rate improvement is something I've been contemplating.

 

In view of this, I may not bother delidding. The temps will be lower and thus less degradation, but given that degradation isn't really a consideration in regard to how long I'll have the CPU, probably won't bother.

 

Another advantage of not delidding is that the CPU warranty will be still in place, along with Intel's performance tuning plan, so overclocking insurance intact.

 

The temperature benefits can be massive.  The best case I ever saw was a 32 degree difference.  If you don't want to lose the warranty, I understand.  I haven't lost one of these chips yet, either due to damage incurred during de-lidding or from heavy overclocking so the warranty has never been an issue for me.  

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Fair enough. 32 degrees is indeed huge. Guess 20 is more likely though.

 

I'll give it further consideration when I build.

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I de-lidded my 4770K and don't remember the before and after temp out of my head but I do remember the difference was HUGE.

 

Not sure though if such a big difference is to expect from a 6700K? I've read reviews of the 6700K where it has been said it's very nice to see how Intel seems to have addressed the heat problem and that the Skylake family doesn't get as warm.

 

In my case though the CPU gets rather warm, somewhere between 75-80C when running at 4.7 GHz using vcore 1.35V and 100% load. So...guess de-lidding could make the temp go down a bit but then on the other hand I do find de-lidding a scary thing to do so I would be happy if I wouldn't have to go that way. Also a difference with my current 6700K vs my old 4700K is I didn't have HT enabled on the 4700K but I do have it enabled now.

 

So...guess an easy way decreasing the temp a bit (and possibly be able to add another 100-200 MHz) would be to disable HT but before doing that I'll try to see how P3D performs with my current setup with HT enabled.

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Fair enough. 32 degrees is indeed huge. Guess 20 is more likely though.

 

I'll give it further consideration when I build.

 

32 degrees is on the extreme side, I did a lot of testing of different thermal interface materials and also lapped the IHS as well as my water block.  With all the other de-lid jobs I've done the difference was definitely closer to 20 degrees.  

I de-lidded my 4770K and don't remember the before and after temp out of my head but I do remember the difference was HUGE.

 

Not sure though if such a big difference is to expect from a 6700K? I've read reviews of the 6700K where it has been said it's very nice to see how Intel seems to have addressed the heat problem and that the Skylake family doesn't get as warm.

 

In my case though the CPU gets rather warm, somewhere between 75-80C when running at 4.7 GHz using vcore 1.35V and 100% load. So...guess de-lidding could make the temp go down a bit but then on the other hand I do find de-lidding a scary thing to do so I would be happy if I wouldn't have to go that way. Also a difference with my current 6700K vs my old 4700K is I didn't have HT enabled on the 4700K but I do have it enabled now.

 

So...guess an easy way decreasing the temp a bit (and possibly be able to add another 100-200 MHz) would be to disable HT but before doing that I'll try to see how P3D performs with my current setup with HT enabled.

 

Haswell/Devil's Canyon was by far the hardest chip to de-lid because of the surface mounted components on the CPU package surround the CPU die itself.  If you accidentally went in too far with your razor you could easily damage one or more of these components.  Of course, the hammer and vice method is said to be safer but I find the razor method easy enough.  I did my 4790k in like 2 minutes with zero package damage.  

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Used the vice and hammer method for my 4770k but read that method is not as good with the Skylake family.

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Yep, that's what I read.

 

Also read somewhere that you can use dental floss acting as a very safe method both for the CPU as well as your fingers :wink: but guess you still want to start at one corner with a razor blade.

 

Just doing some testing here with HT disabled and found so far that I'm able to increase the speed from 4.7->4.8 GHz and at the same time the temperature decreased under full load from 75-85->65-75C. Did have to increase the voltage though from 1.35->1.375.

 

So...now the big question is what P3D will benefit most from...another 100MHz or HT enabled.

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Also read somewhere that you can use dental floss acting as a very safe method both for the CPU as well as your fingers

 

Interesting. Delidded several weeks ago and would've at least tried that had I known. Used the razor method and, in retrospect, can't believe I did something like that to a computer part...

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Interesting. Delidded several weeks ago and would've at least tried that had I known. Used the razor method and, in retrospect, can't believe I did something like that to a computer part...

I know what you mean, had the exact same feeling when I de-lidded my 4770k. The combination of a hammer, a vice and a CPU just don't mix very well in my head :lol:

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Yep, I read that about dental floss too. Think if I do delid, I'll go for the blade method. I'm pretty competent at such things usually.
 

So...now the big question is what P3D will benefit most from...another 100MHz or HT enabled.

 

 

Haven't had a bash at P3D yet, I intend to when I build the new machine, so not sure how much HT has an impact. I presume it's mostly scenery loading?

 

100MHz is very little though in terms of frame rate. All my tests indicate that it's linear in regard to frame rate increase from overclocking. Dependent on your present frame rate, I guess it's just one or two frames per second, hardly nioticable.

 

Did you use Pro or Ultra for your delliding Richard? I watched a Youtube video the other day where this guy used Thermal Grisly. Not 20 degrees though, recall he only dropped 10 degrees.

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