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guenseli

[question] "outside installation" - especially ORBX

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Hello guys,

 

I haven't got it simply how the outside installation of addon will work in "reality".

 

 

I can imagine to install some airport sceneries at a different folder - no problem.

 

But I start to struggle with addons like PMDG etc. which have to be inside the Preapr3D V3 folder, right?

And especially ORBX (Global, Vector etc.) which change core files of P3D.

 

 

 

So, my question: if the next update (3.2) is coming and tells us we just should install some single modules (client, scenery e.g.) do I break then PMDG and/or ORBX installation or not?

I can think that my outside installed airports are save, but what is about PMDG (and similar) and ORBX Global, Vectir, etc.?

How can I be sure that nothing will be overwriten?

 

 

many thanks!

Günter

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Gunter, those questions should be asked of PMDG , ORBX..etc. they are the ones to change , not LM...they had plenty time to read the SDK and follow the recomendations from LM... Simmers tend to blame LM for faults of other developers not sticking to the rules...

 

Jorge

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Yes, I know,

 

but doesn't answer my question.

 

My question is: should I start to install outside what is possible or could I leave it as it is because devs like PMDG or ORBX will make core installations anyway?

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Gunter, I think the general rule is to install scenery outside of the main P3D installation folder - where you can - and to point P3D to that folder.  I have only managed to do this with a few scenery packages.  Where developer packages have their own installation routines, we are at their mercy as to whether they follow the prescribed methods or not - even if the installation version says 'V3 compatible. 

 

I don't think many are very clear on the exact protocols, and rely on the installers to do the 'right thing'.  V3.1 is going to be a good test of how well the new installation hypothesis has worked - or not.

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Anything and everything should be installed in compliance with the new Prepar3D standards. I believe you're calling it 'outside'. Otherwise, yes indeed it is possible for a future update to totally hose whatever isn't compliant.

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Not necessarily. Much of this can be managed using this tool...

 

http://sourceforge.net/projects/symlink-creator/

 

Cheers,

Mark

 

Fair enough, but I'm speaking from the point of view of the general user.  I've not even heard of that, and after reading the description I can't say I  know what it's supposed to do.  

 

It is a GUI for the MKLINK command in Windows, which makes creating the links much easier.

 

That doesn't mean anything to me.

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Fair enough, but I'm speaking from the point of view of the general user.  I've not even heard of that, and after reading the description I can't say I  know what it's supposed to do.  

 

It is a GUI for the MKLINK command in Windows, which makes creating the links much easier.

 

That doesn't mean anything to me.

 

The mklink command allows you to essentially create a pointer to another location, which is known as a symbolic link.  It allows you to view files and folders that appear to be in one location but are actually physically in another location, for example, on a different hard drive, or outside of a programs folder structure.

 

I used to have a *heavily* symlink'ed FSX installation, where not only was I able to run multiple installations of FSX (each suited for a different purpose), but I even had all the config files for each installation self contained with the FSX folder itself.  It was rather complex, but it suited my purposes perfectly.  I even once posted a *very* long description of the process in the FSX forum, but I don't believe anyone at the time had any interest whatsoever.

 

There's a lot of uses for it to be honest, limited only by imagination. :smile:

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That is not an appropriate approach to installing anything into Prepar3D.

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The mklink command allows you to essentially create a pointer to another location, which is known as a symbolic link.  It allows you to view files and folders that appear to be in one location but are actually physically in another location, for example, on a different hard drive, or outside of a programs folder structure.

 

I used to have a *heavily* symlink'ed FSX installation, where not only was I able to run multiple installations of FSX (each suited for a different purpose), but I even had all the config files for each installation self contained with the FSX folder itself.  It was rather complex, but it suited my purposes perfectly.  I even once posted a *very* long description of the process in the FSX forum, but I don't believe anyone at the time had any interest whatsoever.

 

There's a lot of uses for it to be honest, limited only by imagination. :smile:

 

 

Whatever works for you but it sounds far too much like complicating something which is already becoming increasingly  complicated for the average user.  I think I'll pass.    Thanks for explaining though...

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That is not an appropriate approach to installing anything into Prepar3D.

 

....and, if I might add, neither is this approach:

 

F:\Prepar3D v2

 

G:\Prepar3D v2 Scenery Test (which consists of the following folders removed from P3Dv2 root):

 

Autogen (Default)

Effects/texture

Scenery (Orbx) (Default)

SimObjects ( all Default or whatever you prefer)

Sound

Texture (Default)

Weather

 

What I've found is that P3Dv2 can be fully manipulated like FSX without having to use symbolic or hard junction points. FTX Central fully updates manually or through the FTX Central GUI.

 

The way P3Dv3 1.0 is structured, this is also possible. It much more involved in initially setting up. I'm currently in the process of tracing what is written and what is over-written in Texture, Global and World scenery folders. It seems that the majority of P3Dv3 default files are left intact; however, it's to early to tell.

 

Actually, it's kind of like setting up IL-2 1946 and fully merging Modact 5.30, HSFX7, 4.12.2m Stock and C.U.P. into one install.

 

Cheers and have a very Merry Christmas or Holidays.

 

oops...forgot one!

Edited by plug_nickel

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The mklink command allows you to essentially create a pointer to another location, which is known as a symbolic link.  It allows you to view files and folders that appear to be in one location but are actually physically in another location, for example, on a different hard drive, or outside of a programs folder structure.

 

I used to have a *heavily* symlink'ed FSX installation, where not only was I able to run multiple installations of FSX (each suited for a different purpose), but I even had all the config files for each installation self contained with the FSX folder itself.  It was rather complex, but it suited my purposes perfectly.  I even once posted a *very* long description of the process in the FSX forum, but I don't believe anyone at the time had any interest whatsoever.

 

There's a lot of uses for it to be honest, limited only by imagination. :smile:

Agreed.

 

Way back when I had a single 256GB SSD running Win7, P3D and every ORBX addon available (which I no longer do, photoscenery only these days) I symlinked that entire ORBX folder onto another standard 1TB HD.

 

Worked perfect.

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