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springbok204

How Was It Done?

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Hey Guys,

 

I'm 41 but at my age, I jokingly refer to myself as 'a child of magenta'.  When I first started paying attention to aviation, the 757 and 767 were new and while I did see DC10s and 727s, INS as a method of navigation was on its way out and GPS was the next hot thing.

 

I saw a discussion about older methods of navigation and PMDG's release of the DC6 started me thinking.  While I'm a person who reads a lot of history just because I'm curious, I really don't know the technical details of older ways of flying from A to B.

 

Anyone care to point me in the right direction to some literature containing such details?  Anyone who flew the DC6 care to entertain the board with their experiences and flying stories?

 

 

Kirk Mayers

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Anyone care to point me in the right direction to some literature containing such details?

 

If you're okay with reading print:

http://www.amazon.com/Fate-Hunter-Ernest-K-Gann/dp/0671636030?ie=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0

 

Back then, it was somewhat of a dark art, and there was a lot more accepted uncertainty, partially because the data wasn't as strong (remember, they couldn't just download a bunch of data from FADEC and analyze it to improve the flight planner functions). Additionally, the world was not as charted as it is now.

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well these was the way. VOR/DME refers to combined radio navigation stations for aircraft, which consist of two radio beacons placed together, a vhf omnidirectional range (VOR) and a distance measuring equipment (DME). vor produces an angle between the station and the receiver in the aircraft, while DME does the same for range. together, they provide the two measurements needed to produce a navigational "fix" using a chart.

that was the real way of flying back in the days. in the all days you have in the cockpit pilot co-pilot and a flight engineer. does were the ones they actually flying the aircraft. todays day you have what I call instruments monitors. and the reason I say that is because they don't flight airplanes any more. 90% of all aircraft flying today days only required two crew members. but like my coworkers say there are three crews. 1the pilot 2 the co-pilot and the one the actually flight the airplane the autopilot. if you removed from the cockpit two component todays pilots will complaint and the can not maintain and aircraft in level flight, they be all over the sky. those component are the GPS and the autopilot. I know I work in the airline industry as aircraft mechanic.

 so there you have it.

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Thanks for the Ernest K Gann book recommendation.  I've heard a lot about that book and so it may be time to read it.

 

The reason why I asked about specifics is that, for example, with celestial navigation, I only know that the number of degrees Polaris is above the horizon, represents your latitude.  How would you find your way longitudinally?  I'm interested in stuff like that.

 

Kirk Mayers

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The reason why I asked about specifics is that, for example, with celestial navigation, I only know that the number of degrees Polaris is above the horizon, represents your latitude.  How would you find your way longitudinally?  I'm interested in stuff like that.

 

There's a ton of stuff about that, but that's beyond what you can do in the sim here. Gann alludes to it, but doesn't go into great detail. This channel has some good stuff about it if you're interested, though:

https://www.youtube.com/user/NavigationTraining

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This is EXACTLY what I was looking for.  Thanks

Welcome. I *might've* nerded out and watched that entire series after the 6 went into Beta.

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Gann alludes to it, but doesn't go into great detail

 

The most interesting and most difficult for me was the  low-frequency radio range.  I've flown NDBs all over the world.  One of the C-47s (R4-d) I flew had a celestial navigation bubble.  I was never any good at celestial navigation, but some of the Navy's folks were.  The most important thing in celestial nav is knowing the exact time.  RNAV is much more better.

 

blaustern

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There's a ton of stuff about that, but that's beyond what you can do in the sim here

Actually it is quite possible to navigate by Celestial Navigation in Flight Simulator 2004 and FSX.  A little tool called the Bubble Sextant is available right here in the AVSIM library.  The documentation with the Sextant has very detailed instructions and an external link to the Celestial Navigation tables...managed by NOAA I believe but don't quote me on that.

 

I once flew with only CN from Denver to Twin Falls, Idaho in a DC3 in FS2004.  Never peeked at the GPS or Map once and arrived with 20 miles of KTWF. 

 

There used to be an equipment code to specify Celestial Navigation and the FAA gave you a 20 mile either side of your intended flight path "allowance" (if I remember correctly)

 

Pretty pleased with myself.  I think the Constellation from CalClassics comes with the sextant already installed.

 

Randy

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