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MichoJohn5

COUATL has Detected a Virus

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I keep getting messages from my Antivirus saying that COUATL has detected a virus and it's blocking it from running. 

 

Meanwhile I keep having COUATL crash on me and restart. 

 

Seems to me there are so many topics of this software crashing and there has never been a definite solution? Has anyone found? 

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I'm surprised nobody ever questions those "dodgy" anti-virus packages.

 

You know the drill.

 

Download your free copy.

 

They get hold of your PC with intent on turning it into an AD serving machine (won't even mention the additional stuff they install without you realizing, whicht gets them paid)

 

They randomly have a go at software from small companies, shamelessly flagging them as potential malware, mostly because they ship protected executable (against hacking, reverse engineering etc,...)

 

Their hope is that you get impressed and eventually buy the payware version.

 

There is nothing worse for a free anti-virus than sitting there not detecting anything.

 

Sadly, they are overdoing it these days because there is too much competition. (Avast, AVG, Avira, Bitdefender, Malwarebytes all have free packages)

 

Not surprisingly, the payware anti-virus packages don't need to do that.

 

Also, not saying nobody should use these free options. Just that "False positives" are part of the game.

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Seems to me there are so many topics of this software crashing and there has never been a definite solution? Has anyone found?

 

The best solution has been stated many times here on AVSIM (realize you are a new member) but you need to disable your anti-virus program when installing new software and go into the anti-virus program and exempt the anti-virus program from scanning your FS application.  I have my whole drive that contains P3D and FSX exempted from being scanned.  That way you will not get 'false positives' and you can be 100% sure/positive anything downloaded from FS Dreamteam has already been scanned for viruses and it is safe to download and to install.  The same goes with every piece of software you buy on the Internet.  If you allow your anti-virus program to scan your product while you are installing it or scan your fs folders, you are only asking for problems. 

 

So, if you are having issues with Couatl, you need to go into your anti-virus program and look in the Quarantine section and make sure nothing is there.  If there is anything relating to any FS product, restore it and then exempt your anti-virus program from scanning that file.  Go fly and enjoy your flight sessions.

 

Best regards,

Jim

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Hi Jim

I have read this so much about turning off your fire wall @ antivirus so your sim will perform better but gosh, isn't that risky? Seems like going out and leaving the front door of your house open.

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Hi Jim

I have read this so much about turning off your fire wall @ antivirus so your sim will perform better but gosh, isn't that risky? Seems like going out and leaving the front door of your house open.

Yes, it is, and it's TERRIBLE advice...

 

Best to do is like he mentioned set your sim path in the exclusions, since you know those are ok, and you're set to go...

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urning off your fire wall @ antivirus so your sim will perform better but gosh, isn't that risky? Seems like going out and leaving the front door of your house open.

 

You should never ever turn off your firewall.

 

Best regards,

 

Jim

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I have tried disabling my antivirus but it seems my firewall has also blocked it because of some "virus" from FSDT that it thinks it's there.

 

Such problematic software in my opinion. I opened a topic on the FSDT forum awhile back and it got no response. 

 

You guys think I should just delete my antivirus?

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Yes, it is, and it's TERRIBLE advice...

 

Explain to me why you need an inbound firewall when behind NAT.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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You should never ever turn off your firewall.

 

Best regards,

 

Jim

 

 

why? i don't see the need for it if I have antivirus?

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Explain to me why you need an inbound firewall when behind NAT.

 

I'd be more than happy to. I'm a computer and network engineer by training/experience. I won't be at the computer until tomorrow afternoon, but I've marked this thread and will certainly provide the information.

 

Incidentally, there is a very, very good, complete Security Suite available as freeware.  It's Comodo.  I have to review Security Suites routinely, and Comodo meets the minimum standard for the group I manage.  The group has flown shared cockpit (which is connecting one's computer to another) for over 12 years without anyone across three continents and a very large island getting any Malware (except tracking cookies - which actually aren't Malware).

 

That said, I only recommend Bit Defender, Nortons and Karpersky and I have extensive experience with all three.  I personally run Norton's on three flight sim computers, and 10 other computers.

 

I published a document some time ago that outlines the Group Security Policy in use at OVPA, but it's exactly the policy that individuals should run.  The policy was vetted by someone senior who has performed network and computer penetration testing from DoD.

 

You can find the OVPA Shared Cockpit Setup Guide (which contains the security policy and a very good explanation and examples of why it should be followed) pinned to the top of the AVSIM Shared Cockpit forum.

 

Best wishes to everyone.

 

Ah, forgot to mention... Jim's correct, you should never disable your firewall (except for testing, which most don't do), and it's fine to disable your AV so long as you're installing Payware Flight Sim Software. As Jim also said, it's a good idea to omit your payware flight sim software folders and FSX/P3D main folder from scans. 

Edited by DaveCT2003

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Explain to me why you need an inbound firewall when behind NAT.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

Besides the techincal details of that type of attack, I guess you're unfamiliar that most modern malware will not try to get into your PC but rather connect FROM your PC outwards, so NAT will do absolutely nothing (besides the fact that NAT is by no means a security feature whatsoever...)

why? i don't see the need for it if I have antivirus?

Wow, don't even know where to begin on this one... but in a very generic/broad explanation, there are SO many attacks and malware that an antivirus is completely oblivious to, not having a firewall is leaving your door wide open to them all...

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why? i don't see the need for it if I have antivirus?

Okay.  Turn it off but recommend you look at the following link first - http://lifehacker.com/5805326/how-to-turn-your-computers-firewall-on-and-off and let your anti-virus program protect you.  A friend of mine had an anti-virus program once and turned the Windows firewall off and her computer was hit by a virus (or malware) 15-20 seconds later.  I have never used an anti-virus program but have kept the firewall turned on and have never received a virus.  I suspect others, like you, have different situations.  Good luck!

 

Best regards,

Jim

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I guess you're unfamiliar that most modern malware will not try to get into your PC but rather connect FROM your PC outwards

 

That begs the question - how did it get there in the first place? :)

 

Don't get me wrong; a firewall can be helpful in protecting others by restricting the outbound traffic, but once your system is infected and compromised it's safe to assume that the malicious code has already disabled your firewall.

 

It's not 2000 anymore. My PC used to have a static IP address and was wide open to the Internet. Nowadays almost every router is doing NAT and you can't directly connect to a machine unless you've turned off port forwarding or the machine initiates the connection as you point out. But in that case you need an anti-virus or some other mechanism for preventing malicious code execution. Once you're infected, it's too late.

 

My question stands - why do you need an inbound firewall with NAT?

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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Explain to me why you need an inbound firewall when behind NAT.

 

Luke,

 

Below are links to two articles that describe NAT and Security (or lack thereof).

 

ARTICLE 1:  https://blog.webernetz.net/2013/05/21/why-nat-has-nothing-to-do-with-security/

 

ARTICLE 2:  https://blog.webernetz.net/2013/05/21/why-nat-has-nothing-to-do-with-security/

 

LINK to the OVPA Shared Cockpit Guide (which covers computer security) here on AVSIM.

 

 

My very best to you.

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Below are links to two articles that describe NAT and Security (or lack thereof).

 

Thanks for the links, Dave. (FWIW I think it's just one article, linked twice).

 

Let me draw your attention to the following quote:

 

connections from the Internet cannot pass to a specific computer on the inside network through the NAT device since it does not know to which computer it should forward the packet. However, this function should not be counted as a firewall-feature! The NAT device is simply unable to forward these packets at all, even though some functions would need the forwarding of packets. Moreover, a real firewall only blocks certain connections based on concrete policies. A device that cannot forward packets since it is not able to process them correctly should not be called a firewall.

 

It correctly states that NAT blocks all incoming connections (unless you turn on port forwarding). It also correctly states that it shouldn't be considered equivalent a firewall because you can't selectively turn this on and off - it's a very blunt instrument, but to be frank, I don't want unsolicited incoming connections to my workstations.

 

I suspect you're attempting to refute an argument I didn't make. My question remains - If NAT blocks all incoming connections, why do you need a firewall?

 

I appreciate your experience and expertise. FWIW, I'm in charge of network and software architecture and infrastructure for digital presence of one of the four major North American sports leagues. We run exclusively within AWS, and everything within an AWS VPC is NAT. Everything. And while there are the equivalent of software firewalls within AWS, we generally use those to restrict access for compliance rather than pragmatic reasons. You simply cannot hit our boxes directly from the outside world.

 

This isn't 2000. Your workstations shouldn't have routable IP addresses.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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