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sightseer

one little Dallas shot (FSW)

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FSW17052710.jpg

 

maybe you guys are right about it being 'too bright'.  if you set ambient light to black in the sky texture, it looks better.  I am using yellow sunshine though.

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Actually, if there was a bit of atmospheric haze and some depth of field blurring and desaturation on the distant objects in that screenshot, it would be a pretty realistic-looking representation of a very bright sunny day.

As it stands, one thing you can at least say about the super-bright apearance of FSW at the moment, is that it does make the very hard edged shadows of the sim - which normally I dislike, and always have in MSFS sims - look a bit more realistic, since that is what shadows tend to be like on very bright sunny days.

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That shot needs some atmosphere. Hopefully DT can build that in.

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As far as I can tell, its actually DTG's hard coded blackish haze that either is the cause of or contributes greatly to the purpleness of the sky.  so to say more haze is the answer here isn't correct at present.  The brightness of the ambient light does cause the harder shadows but I think they went too far on that.  The shot above shows that with setting the ambient light to black (have to look at shaders and elsewhere to get it darker) you get not such a hard shadow under the aircraft and a number of objects also seem to get a little brighter when you lower the ambient light which tells me they are trapped in shadow somehow.  it may be a lighting bug but I don't know.

I think if they lowered the overall ambient light and then raised the cloud lighting to compensate then it would look good.

One thing no one can say (Chock - who lives in England where the sun is less intense) though is that the tarmac in that shot is too bright because ive been there many many many times and I know what it looks like.

I lived in Dallas for forty years and spent a good chunk of that time walking and riding the bus around and that gives you a lot of time to look at the sky and clouds and everything else.

 

 

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7 hours ago, sightseer said:

Chock - who lives in England where the sun is less intense

The sun is 93 million miles away, it can be intense anywhere on the planet if there is no cloud lol, it depends on the cloud coverage, season and time of day. It is true that being at the crossroads of four different weather regions, the UK can get quite varied conditions, but that includes some blisteringly hot days, for example it was 80.6 degrees here on Friday, with not a cloud in the sky, the following day there were thunderstorms as a result of the high temperatures of the previous day having caused so much blue thermal activity.

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As witnessed by me at the glider club on Saturday - watching one of the instructors high tail it back the field in the Astir. He came whistling in downwind, traded the excess speed for height then landed into wind normally. We got it back to the hangar without getting wet ;) 

 

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4 hours ago, HighBypass said:

As witnessed by me at the glider club on Saturday - watching one of the instructors high tail it back the field in the Astir. He came whistling in downwind, traded the excess speed for height then landed into wind normally. We got it back to the hangar without getting wet ;) 

 

Did he do the favourite trick on such an landing as that? i.e. water bombing people on the flight line with dumped ballast by leathering it overhead at low height with the valves open, before pulling it up for a chandelle to make the landing. That's always a funny one to do. :laugh:

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Hehe no. I was meaning the incoming storm raining on us. No - there was no water ballast on board :)

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18 hours ago, Chock said:

but that includes some blisteringly hot days, for example it was 80.6 degrees here on Friday,

Lol, I live in Dallas and we consider 80 degrees a cool day. I'm originally from Arizona and that place I consider blisteringly hot. Not uncommon to have days reach 110 - 115 degrees with heat indexes in the 120's. Could be worse however, they get into the 130's in the Saudi peninsula.

Btw, kind of ironic to see that screen shots as I can see those buildings you posted from my living room window as I live about 1/2 mile from your screen shot, on the 5th floor and overlooking KDAL.

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1 hour ago, cmpbellsjc said:

Lol, I live in Dallas and we consider 80 degrees a cool day. I'm originally from Arizona and that place I consider blisteringly hot. Not uncommon to have days reach 110 - 115 degrees with heat indexes in the 120's. Could be worse however, they get into the 130's in the Saudi peninsula.

Btw, kind of ironic to see that screen shots as I can see those buildings you posted from my living room window as I live about 1/2 mile from your screen shot, on the 5th floor and overlooking KDAL.

 

I got a chuckle out of the blistering hot comment too.  I've been walking around in Dallas in temps over 110 degrees.  We've had stretches where it was so hot, I used to go to the grocery store at 6am just to beat the heat.  You cant buy ice cream when riding the bus in Dallas...not reliably anyway.

 

I used to park and walk around the Bachman lake trail and then I'd sit and watch the jets land.  most enjoyable way to end a day. 

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