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michal

UK flight training

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Someone asked me for this information ...If you want to get pilots license in UK, say other ratings like IFR, ME as well beyond the basic PPL is it possible under JAA rules to learn all the theory on your own with no formal ground training? We know that under FAA you can do it, the only requirement is that you must pass relevant written exams, but the question is how it works in Europe.Michael J.http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/9320/apollo17vf7.jpg

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Not entirely sure and it seems to change every time someone in Brussels burps but when I did my mine a "certified establishment" had to book the exams on your behalf and they wouldn't put you forward if they didn't think you had a chance. I believe the answer to your question is 'no'.However, there are a number of places that will run a part time, short course that will just prepare you for the exams (i.e. help you with practise questions and the like) rather than give you each and every lesson. They will then organise the exams for you.I reserve the right to be wrong and/or out of date though as I didn't do it that way.Hope this helps,Ian

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Best place to check would be on www.pprune.comCheers,Bryan

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The flying school where I work does offer formal ground training on demand, but I can't remember the last time the classes were run. There are several versions of the "standard texts" available, as well as sample test papers. Much of the material is directly relevant to the practical training, and the regular lesson briefing plus the experience from actually flying seems to be enough for most people.I believe there is a single exam under the FAA system. In JAR-land there are seven separate exams, by subject. Each exam has a 70% pass park. The exams are:* Air Law (required by most schools before you can solo)* Human Performance & Limitations* Aircraft General* Flight Planning & performance* Navigation* Meteorology* Radio Telephony (both written and oral)You have 18 months from sitting the first exam to pass all of them, and the PPL skills test must be taken within 24 months of passing the last exam. You are permitted three attempts at each exam (different papers), but there must be at least a week between attempts.The JAR-IR is generally not achievable to 'mere' PPLs, since the ground school is geared very heavily towards ATPL - you must do the full six month residential course and 14 ATP exams for it! (seriously!) There are very few PPL holders in Europe with an IR (around 4%, I think). There are significantly more FAA-IR holders flying N-reg aircraft in Europe.In the UK, there is an "IMC rating", which is like a cut down IR, and lets you fly IFR in IMC in class G through D airspace (we don't have B or C), but not class A or airways. It's only valid in the UK, but because of the maritime climate, a large proportion of UK PPLs have it. There's a single IMC exam, plus a check ride. (the tolerances are slightly easier than an IR, and the minima are higher, but most schools teach to full IR standards anyhow)

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There's one thing you should know, and that is the sheer cost of flying in the UK. Lessons in a C152 can cost approximately

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Apologies, my mistake.I'm talking about the full ATPL not PPL. When I did my PPL there was no such requirement, I sat them as and when I felt fit.Hope that clears things up.Ian

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