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Guest monkshood

Trouble with Purchase and Validation

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Buyer beware. Some words of warning.Each year thousands of hopefuls go online and spend money, tons of money, on various FS products with no problems at all. However, every so often an issue arises that require the attention of the vendor.Now, when this rarity does happen I think it

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Buyer beware. Some words of warning.Each year thousands of hopefuls go online and spend money, tons of money, on various FS products with no problems at all. However, every so often an issue arises that require the attention of the vendor.Now, when this rarity does happen I think it

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I dear say this reply will last as long as the original.I'm in the same boat with a certain FS shop - well two.One won't accept my card as it's issued by an American bank for myself in Australia, and the other always tends to put a pending charge as well as the purchase price.My solution - I don't buy from either, though the later is the sole supplier of the products that I really want but after it happened 6 times (total of nearly $300 purchased, and with the amount of products they're releasing could of resulted in that again already since I stopped), I refused to continue purchasing, although they have suggested a couple of other options, neither of which accepts my card.Although I have problems, I know of plenty of others that have no problems, so I don't generally try to post against them, as I believe I'm in a minority.The best option, is you should of contacted your credit card company and got the transaction reversed. What people don't realise when they do reversals is that it costs the company you've bought from more on most occasions. Enough people report a problem with a company, the more the card companies look at them.You will only need to tell you credit card company that what you purchased did not work, and that you have exhausted all avenues with the company in question.Give it a shot - but posting who etc, will only get the people who back them up in arms, and likely all instances of the thread deleted.Laurence

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What makes you think your post will be deleted, you haven't broken any forum rules (apart from the one about using your real name). That is not to say your post is going to get a huge amount of respect... five or six paragraphs before you start to tell us what your problem is, and then you start by saying "three PC

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PMDG have been and always will be top class in customer service. If anything, Robert R. will look into this, as he has done with many others, find your log in details and come up with a solution. I remember he found out how many times someone logged in to the ecommerce section but didn't go through with the purchase for the 747-400X and then when the special was stopped, said customer complained about not being able to get it at a discounted price. Robert sorted him out by telling him he logged in 2 or 3 times at whatever o clock the first time and such and such o clock the second time and didn't proceed when the special was on. Give it a day or 3. If what you say is true and you have purchased all PMDG's products, they may look at that and anything else that sheds light on the matter and sort it out.One thing I have noticed in the forums is the amount of piracy that goes on and all add on developers are extra cautious about handing stuff out without what they consider adequate proof of purchase. People still have the nerve to demand support for a product they didn't pay for.I'm still baffled why people would go for pirated software as I hear that viruses and spyware run rampant in those things. I'd rather keep my 200+ add ons in FS9 without risk of corruption. I did get the dreaded black screens in my 747 but Paul from support said it was a corrupted file somewhere because the -400F worked fine and a quick reinstall fixed the problem as outlined in steps from support.Also, you didn't say exactly what you were told. Messages get misconstrued over text dialogue. As I say, give it a few days and let Robert R. get back to you. He always addresses these things personally if they don't get resolved. After all, a company can relish in their success from all the positive feedback they get, but it only takes 1 negative experience from a customer for others to start asking questions.Reputation is a funny thing.Goran

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Well, I thought your issue was at least diagnosed in your thread: http://forums1.avsim.net/index.php?showtopic=246643Have you contacted your ISP to see if there is an unresolved DNS issue?I pinged www.precisionmanuals.com @ 64.71.225.166, different from your 75.126.63.20.It is unfortunate that you are having this issue, but I still think there are solutions out there to resolve your issue.Edit: Did you really need two threads on this topic? I have merged them!

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This is absolutely a DNS issue. I have told you multiple times in your other threads to contact your ISP regarding this - we have NO control over what IP address your ISP's DNS resolves our domain name to. It's 100% on them and continuing to blame us for something that we cannot in any way control is not fair.Let me clarify the issue further so that you understand exactly what is happening:Domain names such as www.precisionmanuals.com, www.google.com or anything else are not the real addresses used to communicate over the Internet. They actually get converted into a number called an IP address, which takes the form of 4 binary "octets" from 0-255 separated by periods. So what happens is, your computer passes "www.precisionmanuals.com" to the DNS server at your ISP - it actually looks up a numerical IP address that is current associated with that domain name and uses it to communicate. The reason it does this is because IP addresses can and do change. This allows the same domain name to always work in "finding" the site, even if the actual IP associated with it has changed. Think of it like having someone's name associated with a phone number in your cell phone's address book - that person can change their phone number, but you still select their name in the address book to call them, even though the number has changed. If you tried to call their old number that's no longer in service, you will get an error.What's going on here is that we changed our server last year prior to the MD-11 release when the new bigger faster one was brought online. This caused an IP change. Your ISP's DNS has not updated to the actual current one (which is 64.71.225.166) and is instead trying to access the old one (75.126.63.20), which no longer exists. This is 100% the fault of your ISP - a standard "propagation" command was sent to all the world's master DNS systems (which ISP DNSs use for their information) when the server was changed and your ISP has apparently not pulled an update from one of them yet. Thus it still has the old IP cached in its records and that's why you get the old IP when you attempt to access our ecommerce or validation.I have just verified that Open DNS does in fact have the correct IP - there is absolutely no reason that using it shouldn't work. Are you using a router or are you directly connected to your cable or DSL modem? If you are directly connected, then simply placing Open DNS's server IPs into your TCP/IP settings as outlined on their site should make it so you're using their DNS servers. If you're using a router, the router may have its own DNS server settings that are overriding what you place into Windows - this could explain why Open DNS may not have worked in the past if you tried it previously.A for sure way to tell is to go to https://www.opendns.com/start/create_account and see if Step 1: Change your DNS settings shows that it is completed. If not, then you are still using your ISPs DNS server and not Open DNS's.Please post back after you have checked this.

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I dear say this reply will last as long as the original.I'm in the same boat with a certain FS shop - well two.One won't accept my card as it's issued by an American bank for myself in Australia, and the other always tends to put a pending charge as well as the purchase price.My solution - I don't buy from either, though the later is the sole supplier of the products that I really want but after it happened 6 times (total of nearly $300 purchased, and with the amount of products they're releasing could of resulted in that again already since I stopped), I refused to continue purchasing, although they have suggested a couple of other options, neither of which accepts my card.Although I have problems, I know of plenty of others that have no problems, so I don't generally try to post against them, as I believe I'm in a minority.The best option, is you should of contacted your credit card company and got the transaction reversed. What people don't realise when they do reversals is that it costs the company you've bought from more on most occasions. Enough people report a problem with a company, the more the card companies look at them.You will only need to tell you credit card company that what you purchased did not work, and that you have exhausted all avenues with the company in question.Give it a shot - but posting who etc, will only get the people who back them up in arms, and likely all instances of the thread deleted.Laurence
Hi Laurence,Thanks for this, with me there is no issues with the card, that works OK. The issues is with my system not seeing the PMDG system and not being able to validate the MD11 that I bought 2 or three weeks ago. I have tried all the suggestions so far, but with no result.Thanks.Merv Gagen

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This is absolutely a DNS issue. I have told you multiple times in your other threads to contact your ISP regarding this - we have NO control over what IP address your ISP's DNS resolves our domain name to. It's 100% on them and continuing to blame us for something that we cannot in any way control is not fair.Let me clarify the issue further so that you understand exactly what is happening:Domain names such as www.precisionmanuals.com, www.google.com or anything else are not the real addresses used to communicate over the Internet. They actually get converted into a number called an IP address, which takes the form of 4 binary "octets" from 0-255 separated by periods. So what happens is, your computer passes "www.precisionmanuals.com" to the DNS server at your ISP - it actually looks up a numerical IP address that is current associated with that domain name and uses it to communicate. The reason it does this is because IP addresses can and do change. This allows the same domain name to always work in "finding" the site, even if the actual IP associated with it has changed. Think of it like having someone's name associated with a phone number in your cell phone's address book - that person can change their phone number, but you still select their name in the address book to call them, even though the number has changed. If you tried to call their old number that's no longer in service, you will get an error.What's going on here is that we changed our server last year prior to the MD-11 release when the new bigger faster one was brought online. This caused an IP change. Your ISP's DNS has not updated to the actual current one (which is 64.71.225.166) and is instead trying to access the old one (75.126.63.20), which no longer exists. This is 100% the fault of your ISP - a standard "propagation" command was sent to all the world's master DNS systems (which ISP DNSs use for their information) when the server was changed and your ISP has apparently not pulled an update from one of them yet. Thus it still has the old IP cached in its records and that's why you get the old IP when you attempt to access our ecommerce or validation.I have just verified that Open DNS does in fact have the correct IP - there is absolutely no reason that using it shouldn't work. Are you using a router or are you directly connected to your cable or DSL modem? If you are directly connected, then simply placing Open DNS's server IPs into your TCP/IP settings as outlined on their site should make it so you're using their DNS servers. If you're using a router, the router may have its own DNS server settings that are overriding what you place into Windows - this could explain why Open DNS may not have worked in the past if you tried it previously.A for sure way to tell is to go to https://www.opendns.com/start/create_account and see if Step 1: Change your DNS settings shows that it is completed. If not, then you are still using your ISPs DNS server and not Open DNS's.Please post back after you have checked this.
Thanks Ryan,I have taken on board all the suggestions previously offered, including the Open DNS route. I did that and as far as I know (following the directions given) I have sorted out an OpenDNS account. I have changed my DNS settings to point to OpenDNS and indeed I am connecting through a router and I have changed the DNS setting in the router to plint to OpenDNS. Hain't made a hoot of difference. I have fulshed, cleared, cleaned everything I can think of, still not a hoot of difference.Using OpenDNS I even entered 64.71.225.166 directly into my browser (https://64.71.225.166/) and I get the notification screen at https://www.precisionmanuals.com/productcar....asp?message=83 even though I goiing through OpenDNS both on my system TCP and my router.Now, I'm not saying that this is all the fault of PMDG, it clearly isn't. What I am saying is that whatever connection methods PMDG is using to sell and validate products isn't working for me, perhaps others as well. As far as the ISP not updating it DNS thingy, well, when I did eventually mange to buy the MD11 I did so on another PC that was wireless connected through my network, so, therefore, using the same ISP as me. Perhaps you guys at PMDG have thought this through and come up with a solution, but if so it has not filtered down to me.From where I'm standing I have a bought product that, for whatever IT or technical reason, I can't do a thing with. Now, PMDG embrace that technology and rely upon it, I don't. As an end user all I want is the product I paid for to work on my system just like it says on the tin, indeed like all the others do. I have no issue with paying for this stuff, your'e running a business; in fact, given the previous products from PMDG I would have willingly paid half as much again without batting an eyelid.My principal frustration is that a solution is multifold and well with grasp and it doesn't involve me fiddling about with softwear here on a system that otherwise works perfectly fine and guns along nicely. Send a file that does not have to go throught this process, you know I've bought it, you have the records. Or refund the cost ($80) and I'll shrug my shoulders and go away miffed that I can't join in the fun, at least untill the MD comes out on DVD. Other than this, the next step for me is to notiy the card company and put it over to them.Ta.Merv
Did you try switching to OpenDNS? That would seem to be the simplest solution to your problem.You can find step-by-step instructions to change your DNS settings here: https://www.opendns.com/start/
Yep, I did, sorry to say it didn't make a hoot of difference.Ta.Merv

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Apart from the fact that the original poster's issue was ISP related, I take this thread as an opportunity to express my personal opinion and vote for a change in software protection.To protect non-material stuff like music and software, companies started to implement copy protection mechanisms which in time got more intelligent and stronger and thus harder to crack. In an attempt to ban piracy, the approach was and still is to encapsulate the digital media in a protective cover of some sort. With the advent of digital rights management, the ultimate weapon seemed to be finally found: Digital media is kept under complete control of the company which sells it. This company defines in the end when, how often, where and if at all a customer is allowed to use the product. Instead of owning digital media, the customer is degraded to someone who first needs to ask for allowance to use the product by going through a process of demonstration that he's no criminal and he has paid for the right to use the product. The result of an undisclosed validation process on the selling company's end decides if the customer can use what he has paid for or not.As a result, customers completely depend on the validation process which is unknown, they don't know when this process happens and what could make it fail. Moreover, unsuccessful validations could additionally damage systems on the customer's side, PMDG is a shining example: The latest service pack for the MD-11 for FSX, should the validation fail and a decision is made that the current installation of the original product is pirated, deliberately destroys not only the MD-11 installation, but deletes big parts of FSX as well, rendering it unusable.So, the customer in fact is left in a state of complete uncertainty: Neither does he know if some mechanism for some reason decides to lock access to what he purchased at any time, nor is there any guarantee for support by the selling company.Another example: Windows Vista. This software needs online activation and requires regular online re-activation. What if Microsoft decides to close down and disappear without warning? In the worst case, thousands of Vista installation will stop working after some time without any chance to recover.An additional problem of the complete dependency from the selling company: Customers are considered to be criminals by default and are in charge to justify their need for another re-install of a software in case a low threshold of installations is exceeded.On the other hand, pirates aren't impressed by copy protection, the piracy scene is alive at all times. Instead of fighting piracy, software protection causes it to expand: Many crackers see protected media as a challenge, they crack because there is something to crack.In fact, the only persons which are negatively affected by copy protection are paying customers. Instead of offering their customers products which are easy to handle, companies treat customers as possible pirates by default and sell digital media which can mean massive problems for customers. These participate in the game and accept all the disadvantages, probably because they're not informed in what negative situation they're in.After all, copy protection turns out to not bring the expected success: E.g. the music industry complains over declining CD sales. Instead of analyzing why CDs are copied (maybe the artificially high kept prices?), a system of patronizing customers and criminalizing them is in place.The open source scene has shown that there's another option: Earning money with free software seems illogical to many, but it can work if "added value" comes into play.My suggestion is to add value to software products as well: Are pirates really "lost customers"? Are they really interested in the product and would they have paid for even if it costs only 1 EUR? Serious customers need added value in form of support etc. By offering added value, copy protection is no longer needed, real customers will pay for what they want to use and the whole problem with copy protection is eliminated.Some customers already abandoned the digital rights management way and successfully turned towards such a business model. I can only hope others follow, and that PMDG will among them.I for my part hate any software protection, as much as I understand the reasons why they're in place. I don't want to delegate control over my software products, I want to play, hear and see what I've purchased when and where I want. I don't see any reason to write or call someone and declare my need for another install and ask for any allowance.As long as copy protection is in place and I don't see any movement towards "customer satisfaction" (I'm not a satisfied customer when I have a protected product) I do what I can to separate me from the protection by getting pirated substitutes. So, I legally own the product, but I'm independent from "big brother". And I can say that I succeeded so far, and yes, I have cracks for the latest and greatest MD-11 for FSX as well - sorry if that sounds "illegal".Pirates won't get away, and it's on companies like PMDG to leave the DRM way to nowhere and turn towards better customer support. There are a lot of opportunities to do this.Nevertheless I continue to buy PMDG products, maybe I'll switch to boxed ones instead of downloads (oops, another security hole, all those .iso torrents floating around...).Andreas

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Andreas,Is the entering of three pieces of information during a setup routine such a hassle?What method would you propose to alleviate these software protection measures?

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Steve, Flight 1 seem to have a nice security system going with the .key file and password verification process. They give the buyer an option to install on a different machine. I have reinstalled Flight 1 software countless times at the "Speed of thought". Sometimes, I reach my download limit but then I go to Flight 1 and request further downloads and it is instantly done. Also, I have requested my passwords to different products many times and it is all automated.Not saying PMDG's verification process is flawed. FWIW, it's pretty damn secure. But perhaps PMDG can implement something more automated for instances such as this.Goran

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Merv,Have you tried pinging since you added the OpenDNS settings? On the basis of those results, are you now pointing to an address that is the same as others have suggested on here?As per my previous answer to your post, I know you were reluctant to attempt making changes to your hosts file; with careful reading, and sufficient backup, you should find that this is a fairly low risk operation. It may or may not help, but it is a helpful method in determining what the problem is likely to be (although, I tend to agree with the concensus, its likely a DNS issue).Andreas,I think you make some very good points - I largely agree with your concerns over companies control over my purchases through their Digital Restrictions Management implementation - but, as I pointed out on previous posts, you have to strike a balance - a balance between the need for the vendor to reasonably protect their IP, and the need for the vendee to easily and seamlessly install that product. I believe that PMDG and, citing another example, F1, have this balance just about right. You're completely correct in that some companies make you feel a criminal and awkward approaching them when you need to reinstall - there was/is one FS addon company rather infamous for this attitude in the past; but they've learnt, through some (brutal but honest, IMO) feedback, that their paying customers weren't by default pirates, out to rip them off as soon as they could. They've simplified their activation process, and, via personal experience seem less paranoid now than before (or they just hide the paranoia a lot better. I prefer to think its the former though :( )PMDG/F1/Aerosoft to name but three, in my experience (and that is all I am going on, its all the subjective knowledge that I have), do not employ unreasonably low reactivation thresholds - at the start of the year, I had a very tricky problem that required, I reckon, four or five reinstalls of Vista and the MD11; at no time on either product was I challenged for exceeding the number of reinstall attempts. That's pretty reasonable, I think... once you're getting beyond six installs or whatever, some challenge may be in order, if for no other reason than to offer support, perhaps on the assumption that you're having a problem - the very "added value" that you argue vendors should offer to legitimate purchasers. I certainly didn't feel like a criminal having to ask for the 747 to be reactivated.

So, I legally own the product, but I'm independent from "big brother". And I can say that I succeeded so far, and yes, I have cracks for the latest and greatest MD-11 for FSX as well - sorry if that sounds "illegal".
I have to part company with your opinions here, though Andreas - legally purchased or not, you're still using unlawfully distributed software, and not for any reason that I think you can remotely justify, other than to perhaps satisfy your paranoia at "big brother"; to be honest, its coming over as a little childish - you've got a working product, PMDG don't look like they're going out of business any time soon, the validation process is as near easy to anything as you'll get (username, order number and serial number? I lose count at the amount of software I have that requires that same information). As a final note - regarding your comments about declining CD sales. My personal thought is as simple as they churn out bland drivel, something the consumer has gotten wise to and no longer wishes to support. I can but hope.

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In fact, the only persons which are negatively affected by copy protection are paying customers. Instead of offering their customers products which are easy to handle, companies treat customers as possible pirates by default and sell digital media which can mean massive problems for customers. These participate in the game and accept all the disadvantages, probably because they're not informed in what negative situation they're in.
Copy protection protects paying customers.A small minority of customers get caught in a copy protection snare, but these events are usually solved quickly because the production companies can track the sale and recognize legitimate purchasers of the software and recitfy the problem.If you want to enjoy complex flight simulation products, copy protection is the ONLY WAY to ensue that the DEVELOPERS, PUBLISHERS and CUSTOMERS of the product get what they pay for.

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Merv - don't know why you're trying to go to pmdg site using https://64.71.225.166/ that only brings up a certificate warning in IE7. Think you'd be better off trying http://64.71.225.166/ then login from there.John E
John, http://64.71.225.166/ puts me on what looks like a home page at PMDG. Clicking on 'your account' brings up https://www.precisionmanuals.com/productcar....asp?message=83. That's the page I always get when I try to do anything that relates to logging in. It's been that way from the start of this.Ta.Merv

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Merv:I just entered http://64.71.225.166/ and it took me to the PMDG home page. Clicked on My Account and ended up on the sign in page where I signed in successfully. I'm using OpenDNS. I really don't think it's PMDG's site.Don Bohr

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Merv:I just entered http://64.71.225.166/ and it took me to the PMDG home page. Clicked on My Account and ended up on the sign in page where I signed in successfully. I'm using OpenDNS. I really don't think it's PMDG's site.Don Bohr
Thakns Don,I really do appreciate any helpful feedback. But to be honest, saying that you clicked on the same thing and got a different response only tells me that you have no problem, it dosen't solve mine though. But thanks all the same.Merv

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If you want to enjoy complex flight simulation products, copy protection is the ONLY WAY to ensue that the DEVELOPERS, PUBLISHERS and CUSTOMERS of the product get what they pay for.
Sorry, but I don't agree here.There are some misconceptions which are burned into the brains of people, but which have proven wrong in history, such as:-) punishment is the only method to make people obey-) securing your house with alerting system protects it from burglars-) people get older and healthier because of the benefits that modern pharmaceutics bring us-) toothpaste is good for your teethand the list goes on and on.The misconception of copy protection is a consequence of the thinking that if something is shielded enough, it won't get stolen or abused. That's wrong. There are sick individuals in any society which make a sports discipline out of stealing exactly these items. The better they're protected, the more attractive they are for those people. So, to a certain extent, protecting something well acts as a trigger for some people to abuse it.Look, in some countries you're sentenced to death if you're found with illegal drugs. But even in such countries, drug dealing is well alive. As said above: Punishment doesn't make a better society, that's a negative answer to a problem, a reaction instead of preventive measures.Especially software developing companies shift part of the problem to the user: They tell him that he needs to have an understanding that protection is needed, and that he must be prepared for some unevoidable disadvantages like that he can only install two times and then needs to call support on the phone, or that he needs to have the purchase confirmation at hand any time he contacts the company, or that the copy protection can possibly interfere with some other piece of the user's system etc. etc. all in the name of "we do all this to protect you and your investment, and at the same time, we protect ourselves". The latter is more true since I bet no company is really interested in protecting something else than itself - customers in the end are only a nasty side effect in the quest of getting money. If companies were really so people friendly they'd better switch to NGOs and help hungry people in Africa instead. Who will? I bet nobody, so I'm right, but that's nothing bad, companies are no caritative enterprises but here to make money.On the other hand, there are the pirates. Does anyone really believe in the myth that software protection hinders them from copying software? Now that that's clear, it's obvious that pirates have fun cracking software protection, and paying customers need to have a lot of "understanding" and patience when using their software.My standpoint is and was that I as a customer find it to some point interesting that software producing companies have troubles with pirates, but that's not what I'm interested in. I'm interested in using my software when, how often and where I want. I have absolutely no understanding for any installation restrictions, nor do I want to carry tons of informations with me which I can then present to someone and kindly ask for some allowance which I don't want someone to give me but rather to have it by default.Whatever the software producer needs to do to protect its software never needs to be partially shifted to the user's side. It's the duty of software producers to find a way to protect their software without the user helping them in doing this. This is the misconception: The user is part of the software protection scheme and he actively needs to participate in it. Completely wrong if you ask me. I don't call my car's manufacturer each time I want to start the motor either. Or if I have the plumber in the house, the last thing I want to hear is why he cannot do this or that work because he's drunken or has forgotten some tool. That simply doesn't interest me as a customer, and it doesn't have to! Not that I'm ignorant, but I pay money and I expect a service for my money and no private stories of this and that.Same with software developers: I don't care why they need to protect their software, the last thing I want to hear is that I need to install something which can destroy other things on my PC just to make that software run and which I hardly can get rid of! Complete ****######!So, IMHO developers have two options: Making a better copy protection, e.g. by using a dongle, or reconsider what they want to protect. Ther's always a reason for crackers to pirate software and for people to steal. I believe the concept of "added value" in the long term is the best approach:I bet only a small minority is really interested in complex simulations like PMDG's MD-11, almost nobody can stand the long time needed to learn it and practise. So, if some person gets hold of a pirated copy of the MD-11 and sees after a short time that it's not the right product for him, I doubt that this person would have ever showed interest in purchasing the MD-11. That's not a "lost customer", but no customer at all.If the software developer opens an area for customers where they get additional informations and support which only they can access and which is vital in getting the most out of the product, this to a certain extend eliminates the need for copy protection. Without that information, the software cannot be seriously used and crackers loose interest, as do uninterested potential customers. Better to have fewer happy customers than many unhappy ones. This way, I guess customers would be ready to pay even more for the product because of the "added value", this compensates for the "lost customers" if there'd be that many.I understand that it's hard for companies to reconsider, and I think things unfortunately will stay like they are now. I can live with protections like Flight1's solution, but I don't feel comfortable with protections like Vista or PMDG has, no matter what arguments are presented to defend them. They are and keep being a thorn in my side since I lack the control I want to have.As I said in a previous posting, some big companies start to deviate from their former direction and have changed their business model. In the music industry, there's big evidence that DRM is pass

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Merv,1. You checked the Open DNS page link gave and Step 1 showed as ok? (Check mark on it and Step 2 highlighted)2. Go to Start/Run and type "cmd" and then at the prompt type "ping www.precisionmanuals.com" and tell me what IP address comes up.3. If it's still the wrong (old) one, type "ipconfig /flushdns", reboot the computer and then ping it again and see if it has changed.It may also be worth just trying a direct connection between your computer and the cable modem, if you bypass the router entirely, you eliminate it as potentially causing this somehow.

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Merv,1. You checked the Open DNS page link gave and Step 1 showed as ok? (Check mark on it and Step 2 highlighted)2. Go to Start/Run and type "cmd" and then at the prompt type "ping www.precisionmanuals.com" and tell me what IP address comes up.3. If it's still the wrong (old) one, type "ipconfig /flushdns", reboot the computer and then ping it again and see if it has changed.It may also be worth just trying a direct connection between your computer and the cable modem, if you bypass the router entirely, you eliminate it as potentially causing this somehow.
Hi Ryan,Thanks for looking at this. I have complete the steps you advise here, in fact I did all this at the very begining of this issue. Nonetheless, I have don it and I have uploaded a number of screen shots showing the results:1./ Ping - is the result of a ping and having flushed the DNS2./ OpenDNS_Post Reboot is the same ping after the reboot3./ OpenDNS - shows that I have an OpenDNS account4./ TCP_Setting - shows my TCP setting pointing to OpenDNS5./ Router - shows my Router pointing to OpenDNS6./ The First Screen - shows what I get when I put the IP address directly in to the browser7./ Next-Your Account - show what happens when I then click on 'your account'All these images I have put up to show that I have done everything that has been suggested. My PC, the one I'm on now and the one that I have FS on, also, of course, the one I'm trying to validate the MD11 on, is hard wired to the router. The Laptop that I downloaded the MD11 on, I gave access to my network so it could connect to the internet via wireless through my router; that worked OK. So, as you can see, since the Laptop used my existing network connection through my ISP, I doubt that the ISP is caching your old page. I know also from that, ostensibly the PMDG site is working as it should, for most. But it ain't working foe me, and most probably for some others too.I hope this helps.Ta.Merv

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Did you flush the Firefox cache? Looks like the URL in Firefox is not correct for the product cart page. I would recommend flushing the DNS entries again and then flush the Firefox cache then try again. Also did you try to activate with the open DNS settings? If you pinging correctly I bet the activation will work now.

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Did you flush the Firefox cache? Looks like the URL in Firefox is not correct for the product cart page. I would recommend flushing the DNS entries again and then flush the Firefox cache then try again. Also did you try to activate with the open DNS settings? If you pinging correctly I bet the activation will work now.
I flush the browser cache everytime I shut it down. I have flushed, cleared and cleaned and pinged everything I can think of.If whe're taking bets, I'll bet I don't get a good validation when I try. I have been trying for almost three weeks now and nothing has worked yet.Merv.

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