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Yoda967

Flight1 Mustang SID/STAR Capability

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Flight1 is updating the Mustang again in the next few days, this time to allow for Navigraph updates to the nav database and to provide for SID/STAR selection from within the G1000. The nav database is the same one you're familiar with if you use Navigraph products for other addons, which means that areas outside North America are covered. A complete database is included with the update, and there are no installed nags, so if you don't wish to subscribe to Navigraph, you won't have to...but it's there if you want it.

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Flight1 is updating the Mustang again in the next few days, this time to allow for Navigraph updates to the nav database and to provide for SID/STAR selection from within the G1000. The nav database is the same one you're familiar with if you use Navigraph products for other addons, which means that areas outside North America are covered. A complete database is included with the update, and there are no installed nags, so if you don't wish to subscribe to Navigraph, you won't have to...but it's there if you want it.
Good news, Kurt :(EDIT: Maybe I missed it, but will we be able to use VNAV along with these STAR's and waypoints? If not, are there plans to implement VNAV in the future?

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I doubt it. The real-world Mustang is not VNAV capable, and Flight1 has stated numerous times they don't plan on implementing anything that the real aircraft can't do. Which I think is good.Gotta learn how to use the Mustang's real-world capabilities, as modeled in the F1 'stang, to fly it in FSX.

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The real-world Mustang is not VNAV capable...
I thought it was :
We headed toward Independence, a nontower airport that is home to the Mustang production line. The Vnav function on the Garmin is robust enough for most any pilot. Alexander and I told the system to plan on our reaching an altitude about 3,500 feet agl a few miles away from the airport so we could test how well the system would couple to the GPS 17 approach there.
Exerpt from Pilot Report: Cessna Mustang - Aviation International News >> October 2006 - AIN is the first to fly the certified VLJ, fully-loaded and to its FL410 ceiling.

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Hallelujah bothers and sisters. Been waiting for this.

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This build just makes it possible to update the nav data, and fixes a few cats and dogs. Sorry, no VNAV in this update.

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This build just makes it possible to update the nav data, and fixes a few cats and dogs. Sorry, no VNAV in this update.
Thanks Kurt . Looking forward to the update :(

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Jean-Paul,My bad on my above reply. I didn't say it the way I meant it and it really came out wrong. What I meant was some Mustang customers expected a VNAV in the Mustang that included a fully "hands off" type of VNAV function, such as an auto-throttle system also. The Mustang won't do that, as the quote below from the same article you quoted indicates."Within a few minutes of the top of descent (TOD) warning from the computer-generated

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This is good news. But have they fixed the autopilot yet? Namely busting altitudes, porpoising in climbs?

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This is good news. But have they fixed the autopilot yet? Namely busting altitudes, porpoising in climbs?
Spaceman, what IAS are you climbing at? The most common factor that causes porpoising in climbs is that folks are climbing at too high a speed. Normal climb speeds should be in the 170-140 KIAS range, slower IAS the higher you get. If you stay at say 250 kts the engines will eventually be unable to keep that AND climb at the same time. The nose is lowered to get back to 250 kts, then raised to climb. The speed bleeds off again, rinse and repeat => porpoising.

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Jean-Paul,My bad on my above reply. I didn't say it the way I meant it and it really came out wrong. What I meant was some Mustang customers expected a VNAV in the Mustang that included a fully "hands off" type of VNAV function, such as an auto-throttle system also. The Mustang won't do that, as the quote below from the same article you quoted indicates."Within a few minutes of the top of descent (TOD) warning from the computer-generated

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Spaceman, what IAS are you climbing at? The most common factor that causes porpoising in climbs is that folks are climbing at too high a speed. Normal climb speeds should be in the 170-140 KIAS range, slower IAS the higher you get. If you stay at say 250 kts the engines will eventually be unable to keep that AND climb at the same time. The nose is lowered to get back to 250 kts, then raised to climb. The speed bleeds off again, rinse and repeat => porpoising.
That may well be, but there should not be porpoising in any event. Does the real aircraft porpoise if you climb at 200kts on autopilot? What should happen is that the fpm should just bleed off to maintain the selected airspeed. You can tell that's what the AP is trying to do but it keeps missing the target, thus the porpoising.From my experience with the Flight1 Mustang, if you set it to FPA mode, everything is solid. It was just FLC mode that didn't work. BTW, where did you read that the Mustang can't climb any faster than 170kts?And on my second question, does it still bust the selected altitutde on climb? It was pretty disconcerting to blow through my initial assigned altitude by 200+ feet.

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That may well be, but there should not be porpoising in any event. Does the real aircraft porpoise if you climb at 200kts on autopilot? What should happen is that the fpm should just bleed off to maintain the selected airspeed. You can tell that's what the AP is trying to do but it keeps missing the target, thus the porpoising.From my experience with the Flight1 Mustang, if you set it to FPA mode, everything is solid. It was just FLC mode that didn't work. BTW, where did you read that the Mustang can't climb any faster than 170kts?And on my second question, does it still bust the selected altitutde on climb? It was pretty disconcerting to blow through my initial assigned altitude by 200+ feet.
Spaceman, I

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Plus, to add to the above, if you are using the FSX default weather, the OAT's for altitudes are extremely unrealistic. They are usually much too high, which will significantly reduce the Mustang's climbing performance at higher altitudes.As SAS263 said, there are many posts in the Mustang forum about this also...and how to "fix" it in FSX when using the Mustang. Improper use of the Mustang flight control systems (ie- not using real-world modeled procedures for climbs), combined with the FSX OAT problem, can make getting the Mustang in FSX any higher than say FL250 an effort in futility.FalconAF

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