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Guest j25

which engine to start first? 1 or 2?

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Guest jasp25@gmail.com

In flying jets, in normal operations, which engine is started first, 1 or 2? why? during what circumstances is it done the other way? what about in 4-engine aircraft? thanks,-j

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Guest CL604
In flying jets, in normal operations, which engine is started first, 1 or 2? why? during what circumstances is it done the other way? what about in 4-engine aircraft? thanks,-j
Each operator will have their own way of doing things. For us (We operate 6 Gulfstreams. 3 GIV's and 3 G550's), we usually start number 2 first in the rare event that we would have to open the main cabin door during start. As far as something like a 747, I have no idea what start sequence they use.

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Guest belga1

Hello,Just a explaination for the B747

h**p://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/tech_ops/read.main/34619/
** = tt :)Google can be your friend to search such infos !Regards.bye.gifGus.

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Normally you would learn that from the Pilot's Notes or Pilot's Operating Manual, and it can differ for each aircraft. The main reason for differences would be the ability of a particular engine to drive other systems, such as hydraulic pumps and bleed air etc, and this can change even on various marks of the same aircraft, as changes are made to different production models (for example the Boeing 737, which used to have some systems only on one of its engines, but which are now duplicated on both with later models). So if you don't have an operating manual, you can work it out from a schematic or cutaway drawing of the aircraft which shows the systems. On the other hand, if the aircraft has an APU which can provide power to many aircraft systems, then it is less important which engine is started first.Some airports may also have regulations about which engine is started first, so that it does not come as an unwelcome surprise to ground personnel working around the aircraft (often personnel will stay on the port side of the aircraft, meaning number 2 engine gets cranked first). Then of course there can also be company rules about it too, which you would find in the Standard Operating Procedures manual for the particular aircraft, which is usually a customised version of the Pilot's Operating Manual.There can be other reasons for starting engines in odd orders too, for example, on a large four-engined prop aircraft such as a B-29 or a Constellation, you might start the two outboard engines (1 and 4) so that the engine thrust can assist turning with asymmetric thrust where it is most likely to be able to affect a turn. With the inboard engines not operating, it is also safer for passengers and crew when boarding or disembarking.Al

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On the airbus A320 we normally start engine 2 first. This is because it powers the yellow hyd system which is used for the parking brake. We also start the number 2 engine for the same reason as stated above, should people has to get off we can simply taxi into the gate with the one engine started.AFAIK, the 744's engine are started from number 4 to 1. Concorde's engines are started number 3 and 2 at the gate - then pushback where number 4 and 1 are started.Hope this helps,Martin

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Er... Concorde's engines were started... :(

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Guest jshyluk

There used to be a Canadian commercial for the department store The Bay. In the ad, a woman gives her distinctive-looking luggage to the attendant and boards her aircraft. She is given a seat above the engine, which is running. She watches the handlers load luggage onto the plane, which they do by throwing the items into the open cargo bay. One of the handlers gets distracted and launches her bags into the engine. All of her belongings are shredded. The voice-over points out that if it's time to get new clothes, there's a 50%-off sale at The Bay this weekend only. Most aircraft in FS9 (or FSX) don't care which engine you start first. As mentioned above, the best bet is to leave the engine where people embark/disembark and where the ground crew are at off for as long as possible. With FS2Crew, sometimes you have a hold for a passenger or some baggage, and so it's a good idea to leave one engine off. Jeff ShylukSenior Staff ReviewerAVSIM

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Guest jasp25@gmail.com

thank you all for the insights - starting engine 2 first makes more sense safety wise.-j

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Just to clarify...doesn't baggage get loaded on the opposite side as the passengers, I always pictured that to be true.

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Guest CL604
Just to clarify...doesn't baggage get loaded on the opposite side as the passengers, I always pictured that to be true.
For some airlines, yes......For business jets, no.

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Guest vtx

we had a nw 747 200 land at manchester nh(KMHT) just a few days ago on a charter. that alone drew a huge croud . the largest thing we see is dc10 and a300 s the rest is 737 a320 dc9s etc ..watching his start up the( 747 200) as we were close to the plane was #4 #1 # 3 #2 .. as others have said here some engines drive certain operations .. i thought id put this info out there for you just as a point of intrest.

In flying jets, in normal operations, which engine is started first, 1 or 2? why? during what circumstances is it done the other way? what about in 4-engine aircraft? thanks,-j

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Some piston twins have only one generator which may be installed on #1 or #2. So if you can determine which engine(s) has the generator then start that one first. Other than that, I don't think it matters much.

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A common start order for 4 engined planes is 3-4-2-1. There is often equipment on the 2 and 3 engines that need to be running soon. And you start 2 and 1 last because the passenger door is on that side, for the reasons stated above.Note that in the old days some aircraft had the passenger door on the right side, and this logic was then reversed.Hope this helps,

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Guest belga1

Hello,Importance to respect the good starting sequence zen.gif On the other channel ... I read:

That Saudi Arabian 747 wasn't pilot error. It was maintenance crew error. They were taxiing it for maintenance and only started engine 1 and 4 to taxi it...They didn't realize the brake hydraulic system runs off of engines 2 and 3. So they didn't have any brakes working when they were taxiing....OPS
r1wfpt.jpgRegards.bye.gifGus.

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MD-11's are started in the #3 #1 and #2 orderI've got a MartinAir instructionvideo where a flight from Schiphol to Palma de Mallorca is being followed. I noticed that the groundcrew also tells the P/FO in which order the engines may be started.

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I think your getting a little confused :) Engine #4 powers the main brakes and Engine #1 the Alt system, They where using the inboard engines 2/3 and forgot to use the reserve brake system for eng #2 or the Hydraulic AC pump (Electrical) for system #4You would think the maintenence crew would learn the Electrical & Hydraulic schematics before trying to move a 747-300!RegardsRob

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