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THRUSTER57

NOW THAT,S AN ENGINE.....

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What is the purpose of the FIN, on the engine ? ( at about 2 O'Clock , looking from the front )

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What is the purpose of the FIN, on the engine ? ( at about 2 O'Clock , looking from the front )
Coz' the engines so heavy, that's a little wing to help give it lift...... tongue.png

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Coz' the engines so heavy, that's a little wing to help give it lift...... tongue.png
Ahh, I see, so if it breaks off the wing, it is SO POWERFULL, it only needs a "little wing" to allow it to keep flying !!

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What is the purpose of the FIN, on the engine ? ( at about 2 O'Clock , looking from the front )
That's called a 'strake', they steer the airflow, usually when it has been found that the form of the engine nacelle is detrimental to the drag or pressure, or is causing turbulence. They are sometimes added to reduce airflow noise too, you can see tiny ones below the windows of an NG that reduce the airflow noise over the windscreen, although very small ones are usually called 'turbulators' especially if they are designed to break up the airflow instead of smoothing it out, as in the case of strakes. In the case of the 737NG, and a few other aircraft that have strakes on the engine, that strake actually redirects the airflow aft in a slightly different direction than it would otherwise go because it was found that without it, the stall speed reduction with the flaps down was not as effective as it should have been, in other words, that strake directs the air more efficiently toward the underside of the wing. Al

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That's called a 'strake', they steer the airflow, usually when it has been found that the form of the engine nacelle is detrimental to the drag or pressure, or is causing turbulence. They are sometimes added to reduce airflow noise too, you can see tiny ones below the windows of an NG that reduce the airflow noise over the windscreen, although very small ones are usually called 'turbulators' especially if they are designed to break up the airflow instead of smoothing it out, as in the case of strakes. In the case of the 737NG, and a few other aircraft that have strakes on the engine, that strake actually redirects the airflow aft in a slightly different direction than it would otherwise go because it was found that without it, the stall speed reduction with the flaps down was not as effective as it should have been, in other words, that strake directs the air more efficiently toward the underside of the wing. Al
Thanks Al Amazing that such a little Air foil surface can make such a significant difference,to be worth adding. !! .

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Here's some more info, routed out of one of my books. Apparently Boeing used to refer to these as 'nacelle chines' because Douglas held the patent on nacelle strakes, even though it was Nasa that did most of the research into them. This is evidently why the 737 and other Boeing aircraft had a strake only on one side of the engine, since the Douglas patent was for one on either side of the engine nacelle, although of course this is now a moot point, since Boeing will presumably hold those patents these days. They reduce the stall speed by about 5 knots at high angles of attack on approach in their effect of sorting out the airflow to the inboard flaps, which as you say, is amazing for such a tiny thing that is little more than a metal plate stuck on at a bit of an angle. A small correction too by the way to what I previously posted, most of their effect is apparently to the airflow going over the wing, rather than under it. Al

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These engines above? they are just mere toys compared to these

If you turn the volume up to max your house will probably collapse!!vololiberista

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How did I know that was going to be a VC-10? Al

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These engines above? they are just mere toys compared to these
If you turn the volume up to max your house will probably collapse!!vololiberista
UGH! Brings back memories of 737-100/200, 727's, DC-9's. Don't get me wrong, I loved these aircraft, but I went to College for 4 years next to Laguradia and constantly heard that awful noise during classes.

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They are all small TOYS compaired with --

Now, That's an Engine !!!

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How did I know that was going to be a VC-10?
LOL... LMAO.gif
No, now THIS is an engine! tongue.pnghttp://www.myaviatio...0585&size=large
What a great post! Although I wonder what they did to the perspective, as I believe a 737 couldn't park where it seems to park in the picture, so I suppose it's a bit closer to the camera as it seems and not directly headed at the T7's spinner.
They are all small TOYS compaired with --
Now, That's an Engine !!!
Damn right. When I read "that's an engine" frankly the F-1 is the first and only one that comes to mind. Weird, all this rocket science still fascinates me. Does anyone know what all this debris is that comes down the rocket side? Is it ice from the tanks which are quite cold as I assume? And how is the rocket actually held in place before liftoff, it obviously doesn't quite 'stand' on its engines. Anyways, quite cool to lift up 3000 tons vertical at what, like 3G or sumthin... Just%20Kidding.gifsig.gif

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LOL... LMAO.gif What a great post! Although I wonder what they did to the perspective, as I believe a 737 couldn't park where it seems to park in the picture, so I suppose it's a bit closer to the camera as it seems and not directly headed at the T7's spinner. Damn right. When I read "that's an engine" frankly the F-1 is the first and only one that comes to mind. Weird, all this rocket science still fascinates me. Does anyone know what all this debris is that comes down the rocket side? Is it ice from the tanks which are quite cold as I assume? And how is the rocket actually held in place before liftoff, it obviously doesn't quite 'stand' on its engines. Anyways, quite cool to lift up 3000 tons vertical at what, like 3G or sumthin... Just%20Kidding.gifsig.gif
ICE

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