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OmniAtlas

Whats wrong with this video?

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I don't see anything wrong, maybe if you're talking about the spoilers extended it's because the pilot is countering the crosswind..

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I don't see anything wrong, maybe if you're talking about the spoilers extended it's because the pilot is countering the crosswind..
How does that work?Just read some of the youtube postings and they said spoilers might not have been up, instead because of the crosswind the pilot had the yoke turned left.

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He just has left aileron in which brings the left outboard spoiler up. Nothing wrong he's just correcting for wind, I do it all the time. The spoilers move with the ailerons to help take load off the wing.diff_spoilers.jpg

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He just has left aileron in which brings the left outboard spoiler up. Nothing wrong he's just correcting for wind, I do it all the time. The spoilers move with the ailerons to help take load off the wing.diff_spoilers.jpg
Right! They are called Flight Spoiler, you can see it when clicking on SYS above the standby instruments in the NGX.

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How does that work?Just read some of the youtube postings and they said spoilers might not have been up, instead because of the crosswind the pilot had the yoke turned left.
That's what Santiago said!

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I'd say it's not good takeoff technique in the video. I believe you don't want to displace the yoke more than 1.6 units during the roll, if it can be avoided and then you only want to maintain wings level.It's not like a Cessna where you look at the windsock and roll the yoke all the way left or right.Oh, and don't take off in thunderstorms.

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His technique is definitely not correct, you only need to use enough correction to keep the wings level (not full deflection like this guy is using) and you don't do it from a stop, you start rolling into it as you get closer to rotate and after wheels up as you need it. Specially on a heavy jet. On a light single or twin you might have to hold aileron in on the take off roll depending on how strong the crosswind is.

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His technique is definitely not correct, you only need to use enough correction to keep the wings level (not full deflection like this guy is using) and you don't do it from a stop, you start rolling into it as you get closer to rotate and after wheels up as you need it. Specially on a heavy jet. On a light single or twin you might have to hold aileron in on the take off roll depending on how strong the crosswind is.
Really?From the FCOM:
Smooth rudder control inputs combined with small control wheel inputs result in a normal takeoff with no overcontrolling.Large control wheel inputs can have adverse effect on directional control near V1(MCG) due to additional drag of extended spoilers.
As with any aircraft, control input should DECREASE as airspeed increases. Why would you think differently?Anyway, it doesn't take much control wheel input to have a flight spoiler out. How could you possibly know how much input he has in?I'm curious, not testing you. :(

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His technique is definitely not correct, you only need to use enough correction to keep the wings level (not full deflection like this guy is using) and you don't do it from a stop, you start rolling into it as you get closer to rotate and after wheels up as you need it. Specially on a heavy jet. On a light single or twin you might have to hold aileron in on the take off roll depending on how strong the crosswind is.
Really?From the FCOM:As with any aircraft, control input should DECREASE as airspeed increases. Why would you think differently?Anyway, it doesn't take much control wheel input to have a flight spoiler out. How could you possibly know how much input he has in?I'm curious, not testing you. :(
Zach,The next paragraph after your quote says, "Begin the takeoff roll with the control wheel approximately centered." Other than some forward pressure on the yoke, you shouldn't be dragging the spoilers through the air by displacing the yoke like on a light aircraft.

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Zach,The next paragraph after your quote says, "Begin the takeoff roll with the control wheel approximately centered." Other than some forward pressure on the yoke, you shouldn't be dragging the spoilers through the air by displacing the yoke like on a light aircraft.
Thank you Matt. I was focused too hard on one paragraph. Very good.

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Thank you for all the informative replies and all the ace pilots out there :)

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There's a very good chance, since it looked very gusty, that if this pilot didn't keep the deflection in through the takeoff roll, a shear or gust could have lifted the left wheel right of the ground even late in the takeoff run.. 767 is a much different animal..

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