Sign in to follow this  
Guest

"Violas" everywhere

Recommended Posts

I have to ask this question because every time I see this word for some reason I nearly die laughing.When someone is explaining how he did something in MSFS which actually worked he usually describes it as "and, viola, it worked" only sometimes it's spelt "viola", other times "voila", "viloa" and even "vollia".One of my friend's daughters PLAYS the viola but, before I collapse altogether, can someone tell me what the origin, meaning and correct spelling of this word is.P

Share this post


Link to post
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Bonjour Jean-Louis,I have no clue about the origin of voila being from "vois la", but usually in french, voil

Share this post


Link to post

hmmmmI always thought it meant "EUREKA"!!!!! or something said when a success happens ... and you are happy!!!!O well coloquial English is awsomely difficult to understand, I guess coloquial French is equally difficult!!!!!laisse bon temps roulais .... mes amis (apologies for my miserable French)Cheers!!

Share this post


Link to post

>I have no clue about the origin of voila being from "vois la",>but usually in french, voil

Share this post


Link to post

Great post! I love all the little spelling errors that crop up from time to time. I'm as guilty as anyone I hasten to add. One of my recent favourites was the word 'studders' instead of 'stutters'. As someone whose 2K2 occasionally stutters I was trying to imagine what a studder could be. Part of a cow, or is that udders?Funnily enough, the worst errors tend to be made by native English speakers!Gavin

Share this post


Link to post

I think Eureka is greek and comes from when Archimedes was in the bath :-) and discover the "Archimeds principle" the meaning is different: Eureka = I discover. Same thing with Newton and the Apple.Jos

Share this post


Link to post

Gavin, I've always been amused by the frequent occurrence of 'studders'. Clearly the correct word is 'stutters', but I imagine that someone made a typo or simply mis-spelled it - and other people started to copy it. Now 'studders' are almost as common as 'stutters'! I guess that's how the English language evolves - as much by error as by intent! Best regards, Chris

Share this post


Link to post

For the pedants out there, let's not forget the accent on the a. It should be a grave accent, not to be confused with an acute accent which goes the other way -

Share this post


Link to post

What really gets me are the frequent hanging or tilting "boogies" (instead of bogies) in aircraft descriptions. :-lolMisha

Share this post


Link to post

Yes, English is a constanly evolving language with "new" words appearing literally in hundreds each year.Not wishing to offend users of any other languge but it's a fact that English is the most widely understood language and also I guess,the language whose words are ,nowadays,most often "borrowed" for use within other languages- perhaps because it is often more descriptive than the native alternative(EG; Le Weekend,le parking ).Not that it's a one way thing but the trend seems to favour english rather than French,German etc.All this is relevant as English is the language of Aviation .In spite of this there are places where other languges are used by ATC- often with the result that safety may be compromised.On a lighter note- the following appeared recently as part of a post on the Yahoo Groups(Airfields-UK-Ireland)- I hope nobody minds me passing it on...................O'Hare Approach Control to a 747: "United 329 heavy, your traffic is aFokker, one o'clock, three miles, eastbound."United 239: "Approach, I've always wanted to say this... I've got thelittle Fokker in sight."Anyway what else is there to say but "voila!!"Dave

Share this post


Link to post

The word VIOLA also exists, it's the name of a cord musical instrument ;)

Share this post


Link to post

Hum, the Archimeds principle!. A young french lad asked to state the principle came out with this one. "Any body immerse in water will come out... soaked" Freely translate from "La foire aux cancres" a french book, author: Jean Charles, published in early 60'sAs for voila (or voil

Share this post


Link to post

<>Not forgetting that a great many English words stem from French, German and Greek amongst other languages.Every time I see viola I get this mental image of Gwyneth Paltrow in Shakespeare in Love and that sets me up for an hour or so. :-jumpy Sad really but at 58 one should not pass up opportunities :-lol

Share this post


Link to post

Hi Dave, isn't Chineese the most widely understood langauge followed by Spanish :-) Sorry to say!Anyhow, le Weekend in French is "la fin de semaine" in Quebec :-)the "little fokker" reminds me "meet the parents". I like this movie a lot!!

Share this post


Link to post

I think that Mandarin Chinese may be the language with the most number of speakers as a first language, but English is definitely the most spoken if you include Mother Tongue speakers and people who speak it as a second language. Spanish is up there but French is way down I'm afraid (even though I speak it!).

Share this post


Link to post

And a Stationnement in Quebec is a Parking in France (Philippe Clay);-) But we also use a weekend over here, though to hear it with a french accent, from France, sounds funny ;-)Hugo

Share this post


Link to post

I think it's a question of which Chinese- as I understand it there are several different ones - like Mandarin,Cantonese etc.Anyway - I seriously doubt that (on a world wide basis) any of the Chinese languages are more widely understood than English.I think what you may be referring to is that Chinese is ,I believe,the native language of the largest number of people.I find it hard to believe that Spanish is more widely understood than English- but I wait to be proved wrong........................One thing I must add- In Quebec when we visited there(My wife being a French Canadian)I noticed that ,in spite of the fact that in Europe(even in France) a Stop sign actually says"Stop" using the english word,or "Halt"(also english), the Quebecois insist on putting "Arrette" on the Stop signs.DAve

Share this post


Link to post

Well, being 58 too we have to take anything that comes along!!! I can send you 18yo.zip if you wish }( :9 :-eek :-sun1

Share this post


Link to post

LOL, in fact it is ARRET in Quebec. The most funny one for me is CUL DE SAC, in plain french, while in France it is depicted with a symbol instead... (litteraly: the but of the bag. ARRETTE is a fish bone!Anyhow, here is what I found:Spanish and English are in a virtual dead heat to be the second most spoken language in the world. As of 1999, Spanish had 332 million speakers, while English had 322 million. They were far behind Chinese, with 885 million. Source: Ethnologue. (If people who speak English as a second language were included, however, English would come out on top.) and Because the birth rate in the Spanish-speaking word is higher than among people whose first language is English, Spanish can be expected to remain firmly in the No. 2 spot for years to come. And if the economies of Latin American countries improve, Spanish could gain importance in worldwide trade and communications as well. from here:http://spanish.about.com/library/weekly/aa070300a.htmalso good source here:http://www.ethnologue.com

Share this post


Link to post

Or...guagesdissapointmentwierd:-hah

Share this post


Link to post

Isn't there a french word for email that originated in Quebec?

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this