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Michael Moe

ATC Modul in the NGX and real life

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Hi,

 

I have been searching a bit about the normal procedure regarding daily operation of the ATC module .

 

FS2Crew does include this but there is a function regarding "altitude reporting" on the ATC modul.

 

In which situation would that function be used and maybe why a special function for it  ?

 

Thanks

 

 

PS!

 

great stuff here also http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/TCAS%20II%20V7.1%20Intro%20booklet.pdf

 

Michael Moe

 

PPS

 

Just bought 6 CPflight older modules for the NGX (now i have , EFIS,MCP EL,FMC CDUII, (5v)COM1,2,NAV1,2,ADF and ATC :-)


Michael Moe

 

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In which situation would that function be used and maybe why a special function for it  ?

 

Not quite sure what you're asking here...

 

What ATC module?


Kyle Rodgers

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I think he's asking what is the purpose of the altitude reporting mode selector on the ATC/Transponder panel on the pedestal.

 

To answer the question - First, read the FCOMv2. Second, Google it.

 

Brian Nellis


Brian Nellis

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I think he's asking what is the purpose of the altitude reporting mode selector on the ATC/Transponder panel on the pedestal.

 

Ah - gotcha. Good call. I didn't look at the PDF he'd posted, either, since the security policy on my work laptop usually doesn't allow it.

 

 

 


In which situation would that function be used and maybe why a special function for it  ?

 

Transponders (what you're referring to as an ATC Module for some reason) have different modes. Without going into the crazy specifics of everything, they can be outlines as follows:

 

Mode A - allows ATC computers to tie your aircraft's radar return to your flight plan information in the system

Mode C - allows ATC to see the above, and the altitude that your aircraft is reporting

Mode S - allows ATC to see the above, in addition to extra data, but what you need to know is that it supports TCAS

 

On the NG, your transponder has the following mode selections:

OFF - Off

ALT RPTG OFF ("altitude reporting off") - Mode A

XPNDR ("transponder") - Mode C

TA ("traffic advisory") - Mode S with traffic advisories only

TA/RA ("traffic advisory / resolution advisory") - Mode S with both traffic advisories and resolution advisories.

 

When to use them:

OFF - Sitting at the gate

XPNDR - At any time the aircraft is in motion, or will soon be in motion on the ground

TA/RA - On from runway to runway

(TA - at discretion, or any time the QRH calls for the mode)

 

 

 

The case for XPNDR only, on the ground:

There are a lot of pilots out there who will swear up and down that you should use TA/RA on the ground, but when you press them for the reasons behind that, they usually just point to their company SOP. This, of course, was written by someone who apparently never paid attention to what the modes mean, and how they can affect the systems around that aircraft. The FAA guidance for the various modes is what I provided above, essentially. The reason is that TA/RA boosts the signal and increases the amount of traffic on the frequencies, which can cause issues for ATC systems like ASDE-X.

 

Source:

Info: https://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/airline_safety/info/all_infos/media/2011/InFO11012.pdf

Regulatory: http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/AC%20120-55C.pdf (page 11)

(AFS-430 is the office I'll be supporting in a few weeks in my new job role)


Kyle Rodgers

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Thanks every one but i was just asking for this 

 

ALT RPTG OFF ("altitude reporting off") - Mode A (sitting at the gate ? )

 

Then what about standbye then

 

When is it used ? (Real life and on Vatsim for instance)

 

Thanks again for the fine explanation

 

Michael Moe


Michael Moe

 

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ALT RPTG OFF ("altitude reporting off") - Mode A (sitting at the gate ? )

 

Nope. As mentioned earlier, OFF at the gate. ALT RPTG OFF is only used in rare circumstances. An example would be a case when your altimeter is reporting false values to the transponder (even if your display shows proper altitude), which then throws off the ATC readout. The controller will prompt you with "[Callsign], reset altimeter to [value]. Altitude indicates [feet above/below] assigned." In the case your altimeter is already set to that value, the smart pilot would respond with "[ATC Callsign], [Callsign]. Altimeter is currently set to [value] and indicating [altitude]. We'll try the other transponder." You could then switch from alt source 1 to 2 using the knob at the bottom left of the transponder panel (not modeled in FSX - there's only one transponder function in the sim). You can then ask ATC if it's any better. If not, they will respond with "[Callsign], stop altitude reporting." At this point, you would select ALT RPTG OFF.

 

 

 

Then what about standbye then

 

Standby is essentially ALT RPTG OFF. Just a different term.

 

 

 

When is it used ? (Real life and on Vatsim for instance)

 

Real life, I've already explained. VATSIM is essentially ALT when moving. STDBY when not moving. Unfortunately, VATSIM pilot clients don't simulate the different modes (apart from ALT and STDBY).


Kyle Rodgers

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Standby is essentially ALT RPTG OFF. Just a different term.

 

Actually, STBY means the electronic portion of the transponder is powered on but it does not reply to any interrogations (no code, no altitude, nothing) -- it's essentially a "warm-up" mode.  STBY is always selected at the gate for my flights.

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Actually, STBY means the electronic portion of the transponder is powered on but it does not reply to any interrogations (no code, no altitude, nothing) -- it's essentially a "warm-up" mode. STBY is always selected at the gate for my flights.

...and this is why I said "without going too far into the specifics," earlier. I didn't want to compare it to OFF, so it seemed to be the closest match (since the only options on VATSIM are STDBY and ALT/MODE-C). You are correct, however.


Kyle Rodgers

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ALT RPTG OFF is only used in rare circumstances.

 

Handy for breaking the 500 ft AGL floor over the Laguna Madre fishing holes looking for schools and you don't want to get caught :ph34r: , not that I'd ever do that.


Dan Downs KCRP

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Handy for breaking the 500 ft AGL floor over the Laguna Madre fishing holes looking for schools and you don't want to get caught :ph34r: , not that I'd ever do that.

 

Not sure who'd be hawkeyeing that much over the water like that. Isn't it just "altitude that allows for a safe landing in the case of an engine out" over water? It's 2000 over South Padre because of the NWR, though.

 

I guess one could argue that the Laguna Madre isn't technically "open water?"


Kyle Rodgers

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