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Guest MidnightMike

Boeing Launches New 747-8 Family

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WOOHOO!-- Cargolux and Nippon Cargo to buy up to 34 aircraft-- 787 technologies to increase passenger and freighter capabilities, improve fuel efficiency, reduce noise and emissions, provide unmatched operating economicsSEATTLE, Nov. 14, 2005 -- The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] today officially launched the new Boeing 747-8 program, which includes the 747-8 Intercontinental passenger airplane and the 747-8 Freighter airplane.Cargolux, based in Luxembourg, has ordered 10 747-8 Freighters and will take delivery of the first 747-8F in third-quarter 2009. It also holds purchase rights for 10 additional airplanes. Cargolux currently operates an all-Boeing fleet of 13 747-400 freighters.Nippon Cargo Airlines, based in Japan, has ordered eight 747-8 Freighters and will receive its first airplane in fourth-quarter 2009. The airline also acquired options for six additional airplanes. Nippon Cargo currently operates 13 747 freighters and has six more 747-400Fs on order.Firm orders from the two launch customers are valued at approximately $5 billion at list prices."We are thrilled to have Cargolux and Nippon Cargo choose the new 747-8 and become the launch customers for this next generation of the proud and valuable 747 airplane family," said Alan Mulally, president and chief executive officer, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. "The 747-8 will use the technologies of the 787 Dreamliner to significantly increase the passenger and freighter capabilities of the 747 and offer greater fuel efficiency, improved operating economics, and be more friendly to the environment with reduced noise and emissions."Both versions of the new 747 will feature GE's 787-technology GEnx engines, meet Stage 4 and QC2 noise requirements, have reduced emissions, offer lower trip costs and have an upgraded flight deck and an improved wing."The 747-8 Freighter will be very important in allowing Nippon Cargo to take advantage of the high expected cargo market growth in Asia," said Takuro Uchiyama, president and CEO, Nippon Cargo Airlines. "In addition, the 747-8 Freighter will be the world's most efficient cargo airplane, which is a key attribute with today's high cost of fuel."Ulrich Ogiermann, president and CEO, Cargolux Airlines, said, "The Boeing 747-400 Freighter has been a cornerstone of our success, and I have high expectations that the 747-8 Freighter will build on that success and expand our capabilities worldwide. The increased payload capacity and much improved efficiency will allow us to continue our expansion and maximize our profitability. Equally important to us and the communities where we operate is the new standard the 747-8 Freighter will set in noise reduction."The 747-8 Intercontinental passenger airplane will be stretched 3.6 m (11.7 ft) compared to the 747-400 to accommodate 34 additional seats in a typical three-class configuration. The only jetliner in the 400- to 500-seat category, it will have a range of 14,815 km (8,000 nmi) and will feature the new Boeing Signature Interior.The Intercontinental will be quieter, produce fewer emissions, and achieve better fuel economy than any competing jetliner. It will offer 21 percent more lower-hold revenue cargo volume than the 747-400 and cost about 8 percent less per seat mile to operate. Compared to the A380, it will offer 22 percent lower trip costs.The 747-8 Freighter will be 5.6 m (18.3 ft) longer than the 747-400 freighter. With a total payload capacity of 140 metric tonnes (154 tons), including tare weight, the 747-8F provides 16 percent more cargo revenue volume than the -400. The additional 117m

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Wing looks a bit weird, will take some getting used to the knife edge :)Any idea whether NCA is getting an option to convert the 744F orders into more 748F orders?

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"Wing looks a bit weird, will take some getting used to the knife edge"It's going by way of the 787 which I feel is going to be one ugly aircraft from the outside...

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Hi Erik,Great news. I think the whole thing looks kind of cool.And I bet they saved a whole bunch in R&D by using the best designs and technologies already in place with the 787 and the 747.Thanks for the heads up. :-)Regards,Joe

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From the artist impressions the wing actually looks completely new.

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Whats with the saw-tooth design on the rear of the engine pods? Some kind of noise-supressing mechanism?

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>Whats with the saw-tooth design on the rear of the engine>pods? Some kind of noise-supressing mechanism?Yep

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Boeing can get noise-suppression without the funny looking hash marks on the outer engine housing. It looks like Boeing has hired on some new radical designer engineers to spruce up the look of Boeing aircraft. Airbus is such a formidable competitor where else can one go but to the spacecraft look to set your aircraft apart in some way... This may not be so important to pilots but for the sake of various airline liveries and Airline customer image, many will fly on airliners they like to look at...

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>Boeing can get noise-suppression without the funny looking>hash marks on the outer engine housing. It looks like Boeing>has hired on some new radical designer engineers to spruce up>the look of Boeing aircraft. Airbus is such a formidable>competitor where else can one go but to the spacecraft look to>set your aircraft apart in some way... This may not be so>important to pilots but for the sake of various airline>liveries and Airline customer image, many will fly on>airliners they like to look at...They've already tested the new housing on a 767, it reduces noise and turbulence.

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>Boeing can get noise-suppression without the funny looking>hash marks on the outer engine housing. It looks like Boeing>has hired on some new radical designer engineers to spruce up>the look of Boeing aircraft.Something again is telling me that this post is another manifestation of your uncanny ability to write words with no substance.Michael J.WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/747400.jpghttp://www.hifisim.com/images/asv_beta_member.jpg

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yah, the last thing on an aircraft designers list of priorities is to make it "look good".If it has no function it's not included (at least in the US, I have my doubts about the Brits sometimes).Of course the old addage "if it looks good it flies good" is still correct, but that's just an indication that form and function go together.

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Chase, I agree. I love the look.>many will fly on airliners they like to look at...They will? I can say in all the flights I've taken throughout my life, I've never had someone sit next to me and say they picked this flight because the plane looked good.What are they going to do? Ask for a wing seat so they can look at the plane? Sorry, not trying to come across the wrong way, I just can't possibly see how, "many will fly on airliners they like to look at".

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Kid spends too much time on airliners.net.There are indeed a lot of fools there who decide what airline to fly based purely on its livery and (as a result) think that the way an airline's livery looks on an aircraft is the sole deciding factor for airlines in deciding whether to purchase a particular type of aircraft.

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Exhaust gases blast out of jet engine making a racket!How does a sawtooth exhaust-design affect these superhot gases? How does it cut down on noise? Im really curious to find out :) Time for a bit of a Goooooooogle :(

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I'm guessing here, as I'm not an aerodynamics expert by any means, but I have a pretty thorough understanding...One of the difficult areas of fluid dynamics & jet engines is dealing with seperation (turbulent intake air).Notice that jets, like the F-16 have sleek, thin inlets, and that planes like the 747 have large, round inlets (I am talking about cross section of the engine intake).This is because on an F-16, which flies at high speed, it is more efficient to use a sleek design- less drag at the cost of more seperation of airflow at low speeds. The 747 on the other hand, doesn't fly at high speeds and benefits more from be able to suck in non-turbulent air at low speeds/high crosswinds.This is why many jets don't go full throttle until they are rolling, and also dictates the maximum crosswind component for some planes. It is because turublent air that gets sucked in sideways can actually break the fan blades. I think the C5 Galaxy is limited to a 30 knot crosswind for this reason.The same turbulence holds true when the air comes back together at the other end of the engine. The high-speed air from the turbine meets the lower speed air that is moving relative to the speed of the airplane. When they meet, they create significant turbulence.After that whole explanation, my only point is that the shape on those engines may help with the unification of the air as it leaves the engine. :)

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Yippeee - yey-yey !!The plane which has won my heart right from the start (and the hearts of many others I believe) is back!A veeerrry happy time for me to be alive. Just hope I can get to actually fly in one.:)))John

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>Wing looks a bit weird, will take some getting used to the>knife edge :)>>Any idea whether NCA is getting an option to convert the 744F>orders into more 748F orders?Probably not, NCA needs the 744 freighters now and can not wait till 2009. Plus NCA can phase out their 747-200F's at a slower pace......MD11, 717, Full Flight Simulator Rideshttp://www.webradium.com/aviationtraininge...87901/index.htm

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