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leeflet

A small innaccuracy (VERY small...)

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Hi - hardly worth mentioning except for the fact that NGX set the bar so incredibly high... On the forward overhead 2D depiction of the pressurization panel (VIEWS -> INSTRUMENT PANEL -> FORWARD OVERHEAD, forward corner, FO side), only one position of the L/R toggle for manual valve operation is labelled (the switch is only labelled OPEN). The CLOSE label is only visible in the VC-modelled panel. Also, I believe in the real aircraft, the position light switch toggle is reversed (switch thrown forward is STROBE AND STEADY, aft is STEADY) - but I can't recall for certain on that. So it's only 99.882% perfect. im%20Not%20Worthy.gif Lee

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The lights Strobe and Steady vs. Steady switch is correct from every picture of a NG cockpit I've seen. I don't know about the outflow valve...never noticed that. Adam EDIT: I just looked through airliners.net and I would say 95 out of 100 NG's have Strobe and Steady on rear side of the panel and Steady on front side but I did see one where it looked like some sort of customer option had been exercised to have it different. I couldn't quite tell how it looked from the pic, but it was definitely different.

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The strobe light switch on the NGX is correct !!
It looks like there is a customer option available to add an extra switch for the strobes by themselves making separate switches for Pos lights and Strobe lights. The strobe switch has off (aft) Auto (middle) and On (forward). And the logo light also appears to have three positions like the strobes. At least Transavia uses this configuration that I can tell from a.net. Here's the link: airliners (dot) net/photo/Transavia-Airlines/Boeing-737-8K2/1627283/L/&sid=e3cb7db7b6fe3a2f77d7024a4dda428f Adam

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The strobe light switch on the NGX is correct !!
Correction !! A typical NG overhead would have " position Steady " up and" Strobe & Steady" down. Off being the middle position.In the 737 Classic's it was the other way round. FCOM Vol 2 page 30. Says the same in my KLM and Ryanair FCOM's. Fred.

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Do the people who post these take some random pleasure in trying to point out where a developer set something up incorrectly? PMDG used Boeing's schematics and expertise to create this simulation of a Boeing aircraft. You'd imagine it'd be correct. Aircraft are just like cars. My old car had an 18-button information display. Others had 12. Others had none. The reason for this is different people wanted different things. Airlines are no different than individuals when purchasing, so features will be different, fleet to fleet, and sometimes aircraft to aircraft.

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Do the people who post these take some random pleasure in trying to point out where a developer set something up incorrectly? PMDG used Boeing's schematics and expertise to create this simulation of a Boeing aircraft. You'd imagine it'd be correct. Aircraft are just like cars. My old car had an 18-button information display. Others had 12. Others had none. The reason for this is different people wanted different things. Airlines are no different than individuals when purchasing, so features will be different, fleet to fleet, and sometimes aircraft to aircraft.
The strobe light thing is not incorrect at all.The whole overhead panel on an NG comes under Optional according to the FCOM's. The OP was just pointing out a slight ommision of the word Close on the Pressurization panel in 2D. I'm quite sure that PMDG would like to know about it.

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I think it's okay that people post such little problems on the forums. That way, the developers can make a mental note of it to fix it if they ever get around to it. What I don't like is when people point to a small problem and the build a huge scandal on it. Of course, this is not the case here. As long as we keep things civil, everything will get sorted eventually.

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Do the people who post these take some random pleasure in trying to point out where a developer set something up incorrectly? PMDG used Boeing's schematics and expertise to create this simulation of a Boeing aircraft. You'd imagine it'd be correct.
Pleasure? No, sir. My approach to simulated flight is the same as my approach to real-life flying - steeped in the tenets of "attention to detail" I learned years ago in military flight training. It's rather ingrained and I don't suspect I'll be changing my spots anytime soon. Apparently, the PMDG development team is cut from similar cloth and in fact the designers of the simulation may appreciate the information. Reading the introductory comments in the Introduction and Use pdf is very revealing about PMDG's philosophy and hard-core approach to the most fundamental aspects of simulation. I am enclosing some screen captures to better illustrate my points: This is the PMDG 737NGX 2D pressurization panel view (missing CLOSE to the left of the toggle):2D.jpgAnd this is the corresponding VC panel view (CLOSE reappears to the left of the toggle):VC.jpgHere is the Position switch in the PMDG simulator:StrbPMDG.jpgAnd here is the switch from an actual 737-800 Airline Training Manual schematic:StrbTrng.jpg The training schematic also shows a sterile cockpit switch (labelled STERILE) immediately inboard from the logo switch and which I cropped out of view. This could be another small item not depicted in the PMDG. It is entirely possible, however, that some variants may not have the sterile cockpit switch. In other models that do not have the switch, I believe that cycling the NO SMOKING sign to signal the end of the sterile period is used to inform flight attendants instead (at least at Continental/United). While I feel confident the missing "CLOSE" label to the left of the switch in the 2D pressurization panel is a minor oversight, I am willing to stand corrected on the strobe switch - perhaps a Boeing revision or variant I am unaware of. In either case, I don't see these issues affecting safety of flight or requiring MEL paperwork.

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I think it's okay that people post such little problems on the forums. That way, the developers can make a mental note of it to fix it if they ever get around to it. What I don't like is when people point to a small problem and the build a huge scandal on it. Of course, this is not the case here. As long as we keep things civil, everything will get sorted eventually.
+1 These post show the enthusiasm and attention to detail of those that have chosen to fly the PMDG 737NGX. The only stupid questions, are the one's not asked.

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Pleasure? No, sir. My approach to simulated flight is the same as my approach to real-life flying - steeped in the tenets of "attention to detail" I learned years ago in military flight training. It's rather ingrained and I don't suspect I'll be changing my spots anytime soon. Apparently, the PMDG development team is cut from similar cloth and in fact the designers of the simulation may appreciate the information. Reading the introductory comments in the Introduction and Use pdf is very revealing about PMDG's philosophy and hard-core approach to the most fundamental aspects of simulation. I am enclosing some screen captures to better illustrate my points: This is the PMDG 737NGX 2D pressurization panel view (missing CLOSE to the left of the toggle And this is the corresponding VC panel view (CLOSE reappears to the left of the toggle): Here is the Position switch in the PMDG simulator: And here is the switch from an actual 737-800 Airline Training Manual schematic: The training schematic also shows a sterile cockpit switch (labelled STERILE) immediately inboard from the logo switch and which I cropped out of view. This could be another small item not depicted in the PMDG. It is entirely possible, however, that some variants may not have the sterile cockpit switch. In other models that do not have the switch, I believe that cycling the NO SMOKING sign to signal the end of the sterile period is used to inform flight attendants instead (at least at Continental/United). While I feel confident the missing "CLOSE" label to the left of the switch in the 2D pressurization panel is a minor oversight, I am willing to stand corrected on the strobe switch - perhaps a Boeing revision or variant I am unaware of. In either case, I don't see these issues affecting safety of flight or requiring MEL paperwork.
Has it occurred to you that not all NGs are equal? ie Some have no logo switches at all. Some do. Etc etc. I appreciate you taking the time to stare at panels all day spotting differences, I do. And I appreciate the time some customers take to find inaccuracies, but my gut tells me these aren't inaccuracies. The NGX is just modeled from a particular N-number.

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Has it occurred to you that not all NGs are equal?
Yes - I thought I said that...
I am willing to stand corrected on the strobe switch - perhaps a Boeing revision or variant I am unaware of.
I'll just move on with the assumption that this in fact IS a variant and leave it at that. I can see why you might think so based on my post, but I really don't stare at panels all day. I happened to be doing a procedure that involved moving the pressurization valve switch to CLOSE and Worried.gif noticed that there was no CLOSE. I just found that odd and perhaps worth sharing with the forum here.

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I must have missed that for everything else.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Lol. Again I appreciate the time spent, I was just adding my two cents.

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For all the strobe light nitpickers - this is a photo from the actual aircraft we had access to: ngx_lights.jpg We did NOT set out to model every available option on this airplane. There are literally thousands of them that exist, a lot of them aftermarket (ie done by the airline itself, not by Boeing). What we tried to do were a handful of the most common ones that tend to actually affect operation of the airplane. (ie HGS present vs. not, fail operational vs. fail passive autoland, EFIS/MAP vs. PFD/ND etc) If an airline wants us to model their exact layout 100% (which could involve changing models, textures, and systems programming) then we can talk to their training department about what that would take to do cost-wise but we are not going to get into trying to add every single real world option to the general release of the airplane.

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This is a screenshot of the copilot side and his bright control knobs for DUs. The knobs work perfectly, the labels are inverted.immaginekdf.jpg Sorry, the image was taken through my netbook (I'm writing from it) connected via VNC to the main PC of my home.

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ngx_lights.jpg
The apparent wear pattern around the strobe switch is interesting. It gets far more use than the other switches on that sub panel. It has always struck me as inconsistent, that to turn the strobes ON, the switch has to be put into the UP position, where the UP position is OFF for the other light functions. Maybe this is why some airlines have different switch configuration options here. ? To me, it would be more logical to keep OFF as UP, then Center = Position Steady, and fully DOWN, = Position + STROBE ON. ie The more DOWN=ON you go, the more you turn on. But it is what it is, and one learns to deal with it ...

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Excellent job on the B737 NGX guys. Just a little thing I noticed. When starting the APU with the ships battery the battery drain was showing -255 the whole time of the start cycle, in actual fact in the real ones it starts off with a fair amount higher drain and gradually drops off the a lot less near the end of the apu start cycle. Just little things if wanting to model the systems more accurately. Michael

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Excellent job on the B737 NGX guys. Just a little thing I noticed. When starting the APU with the ships battery the battery drain was showing -255 the whole time of the start cycle, in actual fact in the real ones it starts off with a fair amount higher drain and gradually drops off the a lot less near the end of the apu start cycle. Just little things if wanting to model the systems more accurately. Michael
Add that there is no current drain from the AC GEN1 if starting APU in AC...

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The apparent wear pattern around the strobe switch is interesting. It gets far more use than the other switches on that sub panel. It has always struck me as inconsistent, that to turn the strobes ON, the switch has to be put into the UP position, where the UP position is OFF for the other light functions. Maybe this is why some airlines have different switch configuration options here. ? To me, it would be more logical to keep OFF as UP, then Center = Position Steady, and fully DOWN, = Position + STROBE ON. ie The more DOWN=ON you go, the more you turn on. But it is what it is, and one learns to deal with it ...
Here here, I agree completely. It is what it is, but it is just plain stupid the way Boeing has the Strobe light orientation, it's very counter intuitive.

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