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windshearDK

Planning my first polar route, anything I have to keep in mind?

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Besides watching my fuel temperature, are there other things I have to keep in mind?

I mean can I leave my sim? Or do I need to have true/magnetic heading turned on at set parts of the trip?

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I haven't flown Polar routes yet, but next time, clicking "submit" once is more than enough ;-)

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I can't remember if I read it or my FedEx buddy told me but I believe the true/magnetic automatically changes when you pass a specific parallel.

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Suggest you open the FCTM, type polar into the search field and read the topic on page 4.16. Primary roll mode is LNAV with heading mode NORMAL (magnetic not true).

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I will be wearing led underwear

Sounds safe enough, don't forget to compensate for it in your ZFW

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LOL yeah I am sorry, but it said "Service unavailable" so I created the topic again

 

Note it said "service unavailable," and not "topic didn't post."  :wink:

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I am still flying my first polar route and you don't have to change your heading to true but if you want it to be as real as possible then do it. But I haven't gone off course and half and hour left on my flight so good luck and make sure to sleep. KSFO TO OMDB 14 hour flight....

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I am still flying my first polar route and you don't have to change your heading to true but if you want it to be as real as possible then do it. But I haven't gone off course and half and hour left on my flight so good luck and make sure to sleep. KSFO TO OMDB 14 hour flight....

 

I did that route just yesterday. PFPX said it would be 15:42h and it took me 15:40h (i got an visual approach...) and the fuel burn was within 100kg (!) of the calculated amount. AMazing combination of two awesome products!

 

http://www.vataware.com/flight.cfm?id=12534144

 

btw, here an pilot of EK in a presentation about polar ops and what to do for preparation:

 

 

Have fun!

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Thanks Boaz for your time on getting it out to me. 

 

This Website is very cool.

 

ALB

Giancarlo

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hey I did a similar polar route this week which took me within 200 nm of the n pole and at aroud that point the aircraft started to gradually veer off lnav a number of times I had to correct using hdg select each time and as soon as the track started to lead away from the pole this stopped.

 

my routing

 

klaxvtbs

 

 

GMN4 GMN DCT AMONT V459 FRA J7 FMG J5 SEA DCT BOXEX DCT 60N123W DCT XOVAR DCT BIBOX DCT COTLO DCT 70N126W 75N129W DCT TAVRI DCT PEASY DCT 85N150W DCT NALIM DCT KUBON DCT IRMAK DCT ROMUL DCT SALAK DCT OLEMU G112 LUMIG B155 IRKUP A492 OSKEN A823 LETBI B480 MORIT DCT GOBIN B330 JTG G212 XFA A581 SAGAG B218 LPB B346 BKK

 

nearly 17 hours with mostly head wind

 

 

also magnetic heading selected automatically after 70 n and on the subject of true heading I noticed that real wourd 777 routes across oceans also switch to true whilst over the ocean ive seen this in 777 flightdeck dvds im not entirely sure why they would do this though........... anyone?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

kav

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On thing I've observed is an odd phenomenom with regards to the fuel system: On polar routes, when the fuel temp drops low enough that the fuel freezes and the engines seize, I've noticed that the cold fuel actual causes the pilots and pax to begin sweating profusely.

 

I'll never understand it.

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On thing I've observed is an odd phenomenom with regards to the fuel system: On polar routes, when the fuel temp drops low enough that the fuel freezes and the engines seize, I've noticed that the cold fuel actual causes the pilots and pax to begin sweating profusely.

 

I'll never understand it.

:P

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On thing I've observed is an odd phenomenom with regards to the fuel system: On polar routes, when the fuel temp drops low enough that the fuel freezes and the engines seize, I've noticed that the cold fuel actual causes the pilots and pax to begin sweating profusely.

 

I'll never understand it.

 

It's pretty obvious.

 

When the engines stop, they stop feeding the Packs with pressurized air.

 

The Packs need pressurized air to make the Air Conditioning work.

 

Even in cold areas, the inside of the cabin heats up rather quickly as there is no airflow. Indeed, over a very reflective surface like ice, the amount of light entering  the cabin windows will be increased, and with no airflow to remove any heat, a greenhouse type of effect begins happening, and the inside of the cabin warms up. Add several hundred warm blooded mammals breathing and moving around, and you have a rather warm cabin.

 

Standard mammalian physiology will cause sweating.

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I've done about 4 or 5 polar route since the 777X released.  

 

Now not that it matters but I also check space weather as they do in real life.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/acnetworkweather/home/space-weather

 

Everything within that page can shows graphs or explains the info within the graphs and even has a calculator provided by the FAA to see how much radiation one might have over the course of a flight. 

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I've done about 4 or 5 polar route since the 777X released.  

 

Now not that it matters but I also check space weather as they do in real life.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/acnetworkweather/home/space-weather

 

Everything within that page can shows graphs or explains the info within the graphs and even has a calculator provided by the FAA to see how much radiation one might have over the course of a flight. 

 

They misspelt Auckland as "Aukland" in one picture...

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They misspelt Auckland as "Aukland" in one picture...

LOL, they sure did.  I'm always looking on the northern hemisphere, or really just other links within that page. 

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LOL, they sure did.  I'm always looking on the northern hemisphere, or really just other links within that page. 

 

Tomorrow's galactic forecast: cloudy with a chance of meatballs...

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