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olliecast

has a citation x ever gone from uk to new york?

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Evening all,

Im a keen citation x user utilising the esdg model.

 

Ive seen plenty of claims of flying from london to new york however ive never managed to make it from a fuel perspective.

Fuel planner says i need more than the aircraft carries and upon trying i do runout.

 

Im running 2 very light passengers and hardly any cargo from egnx. I use 2000ft step climbs but the only thing i can think of is im using cruise thrust and should mabe think of throttling back but i think this'll probably be in vein.

 

not sure if its ever been done or whether anyone has any advise?

 

Heres the link to one of the sites:

http://www.rockitair.com/aircraft/citationX/default.html

 

Cheers

Ollie

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I don't know, but the distance exceeds the jets range.

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Citation x range is 3216nm and flight estimation 2994nm.

 

Appreciate this doesnt take into account winds and sids/stars but curious on the claim in the link

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We recall the story of Arnold Palmer flying his from Latrobe PA to the British Open in Scotland... B)

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It is very possible. Aircraft with at least 800 nautical mile range can safely cross the North-Atlantic without ferry tank
Plot out a course from
CYYR - Goose Bay airport, Canada to
CYVP - Kuujjuaq airport, Canada to
CYFB - Iqaluit airport, Canada to
CYVM - Qikiqtarjuaq airport, Canada to
BGBW - Narsarsuaq airport, Greenland to
BGSF - Sondre Stromfjord airport, Greenland to
BGKK - Kulusuk airport, Greenland to
BIKF - Keflavik airport, Iceland to
EGPC - Wick airport, Scotland
see if that works for you. With careful planning you can jump the ditch. I have done it about 13 times in a 750. My father is an avid golfer so when he says go, We start planning. Many prop planes are ferried by some very talented pilots. Just plot your courses and leave reserve fuel, You can plan a point of no return, Leave enough fuel to get you there.

Citation X Specs:

General characteristics
Crew: 2
Capacity: 8-12 passengers
Length: 72 ft 4 in
Wingspan: 63 ft 7 in
Height: 19 ft 2 in
Wing area: 527.0 ft²
Aspect ratio: 7.8:1
Empty weight: 21,600 lb
Max takeoff weight: 36,100 lb
Powerplant: 2× Rolls-Royce/Allison AE 3007C-1 turbofan, 6,764 lbf (30.01 kN) each

Performance
Maximum speed: Mach 0.92 (MMO)
Cruise speed: 525 knots (604 mph) at 35,000 ft
Range: 3,216 nmi (3,700 mi)
Service ceiling: 51,000 ft
Rate of climb: 3,650 ft/min
Takeoff distance: 5,140 ft
Landing distance: 3,400 ft
Fuel capacity: 1,926 US gallons

 

The Eagle Soft Citation X will do this. It is close enough to real and flight model, planning, and all to do this. Do a little research, as if I provide you a plan, that takes the learning curve to nil. That is half the fun of it. It you fly this airplane like you don't have a do over it is very rewarding. We can provide you with much help on every aspect of flying this beautiful machine in the ES Forums. Give it a go, I think you will like the challenge. You can shorten the hops, break the legs down to around three and have a blast. Capt. McGill, R.J. USN Retired.

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We recall the story of Arnold Palmer flying his from Latrobe PA to the British Open in Scotland...

But on his return trip I doubt he could have repeated this feat.  B)

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Thanks guys some great info.

 

I get the ferrying of the aircraft however the london to new york was the journey i just couldnt get my head around (and still cant) :)

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But on his return trip I doubt he could have repeated this feat.  B)

Hmm how did it get back stateside then..? Arnold is an accomplished pilot.

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Hmm how did it get back stateside then..

?????? The same way everybody else does that doesn't have range - with a refueling stop.

 

'Accomplished pilot' rather has little to do with aircraft range.

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We answered your question in the best manner we could. And you turned the thread into this. Ron has one of the best Business Aircraft ever designed for FSX. I love it, have many hours in a real one. Insulting, childish remarks turn me off and make me regretful for even trying to help. You ask a question that was very vague. If you would like a question answered to the point then get there when you ask. Do some study and learn. There are rules as far as crossing vast bodies of water and a good start would be FAR/AIM. If you don't know what that is GTS. Google That @#&%. You may be amazed at what you might learn. I am an avid pilot that offers the truest answers to people who ask the simplest questions, even though they are simple, the only stupid question is one you don't ask. To my knowledge there is no age limit to the forum. But common respect of the fellow man isn't much to ask. I am done with this thread. Either learn or play it as game that is your choice. But be respectful. That isn't too much to ask. Good day sir, Capt. McGill, R. J. USN Retired.

 

Added information for you. Just a little research:

Arnold Palmer, one of the first athletes to pilot his own plane, has taken his last flight.

 

Palmer, now 81, flew a Cessna Citation 10 jet from Palm Springs, Calif., to Orlando, Fla., on Monday, marking his last day in the cockpit as a pilot. His license expired on Jan. 31.

"I'll still be flying in my plane as much as always, just not in the cockpit," Palmer told GolfDigest.com last week before his final flight. "Flying has been one of the great things in my life. It's taken me to the far corners of the world. I met thousands of people I otherwise wouldn't have met. And I even got to play a little golf along the way."

Palmer first flew in 1956. He started flying jets in 1966 and began flying to tournaments around the country. He flew a Boeing 747 in 1969 and once flew a Lear jet around the globe in 57 hours, 25 minutes and 42 seconds, a speed record that still stands.

Palmer ends his career as a pilot with 20,000 hours in the cockpit.

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To answer the OP's original question, New York to London is definitely do-able in the Citation X - though probably not with more than a couple of passengers - as long as there is a reasonable tailwind - which is almost always the case on the eastbound north Atlantic routes. (Especially at this time of year). Our company has operated an Embraer Legacy 600, which has almost an identical range to the 750, and have flown it non-stop from Teterboro to Stansted or Luton on several occasions.

 

Going the other way, however is a different story. Any significant headwinds will make it impossible to go UK to NY with the FAA-required reserves for a transoceanic flight. On the few occasions where we have flown the Legacy non-stop, the return flight originated in EINN (Shannon), rather than London - and the upper winds on the westbound tracks were unusually light, and more of a crosswind than a headwind.

 

The great majority of westbound flights require a fuel stop at Gander or Halifax, especially when departing from London airports, rather than from Ireland.

 

We also operate a Gulfstream G200 with similar range specs to the C750 and Legacy, and it is the same story. Non-Stop going east on most occasions, but stopping at CYQX to refuel on the way back almost every time.

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JRBarrett - thanks for comprehensive post, at least someone is making sense here!!! Short story - Mr.Palmer most likely had to refuel westbound.

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Post #5 above made perfect sense but you refuse to acknowledge the same??? :blink: You have no direct knowledge of what Palmer did to accomplish the return trip so why speculate?

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