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Jude Bradley

i5-2500K => i7 4790K (worth it?)

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Anyone had a good experience to share with this?

I know that a new motherboard will be needed too.

 

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The next generation of Intel CPUs Skylake should be appearing in around three months time, you would be better off waiting for these if you can.

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I see your point,but I'm looking for feedback on anyone who's gone this upgrade path.

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I went from an i5-2500K to an i7-4770K. I didn't notice much (if any) difference with FSX, but it was a useful upgrade for non-FS reasons.

 

Cheers!

Luke

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I've been contemplating it as well. My 2500 runs so nice at 4.8 as it is. Hard to justify the cost over the gains. Will wait and see what Skylake brings, but I'm not holding my breath.

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I rebuilt Rome over Christmas, moving from a 2600K at 4.8GHz to a 4790K at 4.7GHz (both water cooled using a high capacity custom loop).  I also moved up from a water-cooled GTX680 (4GB) to a water-cooled GTX980 (also 4GB).

 

FSX runs a bit smoother on the new rig, particularly when panning around on the ground and in other places where I got some minor stutters before.  Frame rates are very stable locked at 30 (1/2 Vsync)...more so than on the 2600K, but not dramatically so, although in heavy weather it really shows its muscle.  The biggest improvements (and the reason for the build) were seen in P3D.  I moved the 2600K over and put a superclocked GTX970 in it, and it now serves as my satellite machine when simming and primary rig for general use and FPS games.

 

From the old to the new, the gains were the faster (~7%) CPU throughput, and the faster two-generations newer GPU on a PCIe 3.0 bus.  Not an earth-shaking move up in FSX, but a move up nonetheless.

 

Regards

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Thanks Rob,

The main reason for the new build is P3D and to try to minimise stutters when panning and take-off roll, as well as X-Plane.

Sounds like it might be a move up. I'm not looking to take advantage of the latest out there, just move up a notch.

 

Thanks to all who replied.

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I rebuilt Rome over Christmas, moving from a 2600K at 4.8GHz to a 4790K at 4.7GHz (both water cooled using a high capacity custom loop).  I also moved up from a water-cooled GTX680 (4GB) to a water-cooled GTX980 (also 4GB).

 

FSX runs a bit smoother on the new rig, particularly when panning around on the ground and in other places where I got some minor stutters before.  Frame rates are very stable locked at 30 (1/2 Vsync)...more so than on the 2600K, but not dramatically so, although in heavy weather it really shows its muscle.  The biggest improvements (and the reason for the build) were seen in P3D.  I moved the 2600K over and put a superclocked GTX970 in it, and it now serves as my satellite machine when simming and primary rig for general use and FPS games.

 

From the old to the new, the gains were the faster (~7%) CPU throughput, and the faster two-generations newer GPU on a PCIe 3.0 bus.  Not an earth-shaking move up in FSX, but a move up nonetheless.

 

Regards

 

Your improvements pretty much match mine when I upgraded my graphics from a GTX680 to a GTX780Ti, in FSX I'm can now see over 100 FPS whislt panning around on the ground and in heavy weather (generated by REX) I've gone from high teens to high twenties. P3D is able to make much better use of the graphics card than FSX so again I'm wandering how much of your overall improvements are due to the graphics upgrade rather than the CPU upgrade.

 

From some unofficial benchmarks Skylake looks like it will be bringing a 15% increase over the equivalent Haswell (4790K) which if true will be the biggest performance jump in the last few generations. It will also bring DDR4 support and a platform that should allow upgrades to at least one further generation of CPU without having to change motherboard again. IMHO unless you can get a real bargain investing in a Haswell at this point of time really isn't a good idea.

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Although my upgrade was slightly different, (i7-2600k---i7-4790k) I paired this update with new GPU, (670gtx---970gtxssc) and faster ram, (corsair 16gb 9cl 1600---gskill 16gb 10cl 2400) and results of CPU throughput were similar to above posts. While my fps gain was modest, scenery loading started flying and stutters became a thing of the past. Skylake is promising better single thread gains, and if that is the only component you plan on changing I think its a smarter move to wait for the LGA1151 k chips.

That being said, i7-4790k at micro center is $269.99 right now.

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Thanks for the tip Heisenberg (Love Breaking Bad too) :), but I'm in Ireland so Newegg would the next bext deal.(good value there too).

I aim to keep the existing RAM (1600Mhz) and have upgraded from a GTX580 to a GTX970,so it looks like the CPU is the weakest link in the chain right now.

Thanks all for your good advise

 

Jude

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I had a chance to test 2600K -> 4790K in FSX and P3D, and saw no real gains. The GPU was the same, GTX980, same make, components that changed were mobo obviously, RAM 1600->2400 and the CPU. Both were running at 4.8Ghz, and the FPS difference was about +7% with the 4790K (in a heavy loaded scenario with an addon airport and the NGX).

So no, not worth upgrading, if the clock you are aiming for is the same. Considering 4790K runs at 4.4Ghz, and depending if you OC your 2500K, it might be or might be not worth the upgrade.

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Thanks for your thoughts on this Simon.

I'm quite happy at the moment with the 2500K with my GTX970 getting ~40 fps with Prepar3d. X-Plane is another matter though and this would be my main reason for upgrade. I'll see how it goes and the prices will only get lower the longer I wait.

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Skylake looks like it will be bringing a 15% increase over the equivalent Haswell (4790K) which if true will be the biggest performance jump in the last few generations. It will also bring DDR4 support

 

Hmm so it isn't that much of a jump over Haswell-e (which already has DDR4).

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Hmm so it isn't that much of a jump over Haswell-e (which already has DDR4).

 

Is this supposed to be a meaningful contribution to this thread, or are you just passing by dropping vague bombs & clocking up you post count? 

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I agree with  SimonC. If you have heavy overclocked 2xxx or 3xxx i7, new hanswell is no big gain. Tests (not just FSX, but overall testing) says that gain is about 7-10% from Ivy/Sandy Bridge clocket at same freq.

 

Even 4790k is open for OC, it have same limits as cheaper 4770k (looks like 4790k is factory overclocked 4770k). At air cooling you propably get max 4.7GHz and 4.8 maby 4.9 with water cooling, but in FSX from my experience turbo boost frequency doenst fall from 4.4GHz, so It is no need overclock this beast, stock performance is same as olders i7 overclocked to 4.7-4.8-4.9.

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Well,my current clock is 4.2. I did get higher but got all sort of fsx crashes,so dropped back down again (air cooled). 

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I agree that upgrading from a significantly overclocked i5 2500k CPU to an i7 4790k will not provide enough of a performance gain to warrant the expense. If my i5 2500k powered PC hadn't failed me last July, I would almost certainly still be using it today. All I would have needed would have been a graphics card upgrade. Whilst the latest CPUs have lots of fancy new tricks, it doesn't translate all that well into raw performance gains with most software.

 

Once upon a time you could rely on Moore's Law and steady clock frequency increases to virtually guarantee significantly greater performance from newer CPUs, but those days are long gone. Clock frequency has hardly moved in the past five years, and that's a lifetime in this industry.

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Hi Chris, that's exactly what I did. I upgraded from a GTX580 to a GTX970. Much more smooth all around - esp with Track Ir.Happy enough with FSX/Prepar3d at this stage.I was just thinking if the 4790 would have given much more, but it seems that it's not worth the outlay, If however the i5 does go at some stage then this would be the next best thing. 

Thanks for the feedback.

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I personally think that the i5 2500k was one of the best processors of all time. If you hear that stock is running out, then it's probably because SkyNet is snapping them up to add to its neural net :wink:

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I personally think that the i5 2500k was one of the best processors of all time. If you hear that stock is running out, then it's probably because SkyNet is snapping them up to add to its neural net :wink:

 

Unlikely. If you already have a large multi-core network you don't care about single core or single socket performance. You certainly don't overclock.

 

You care a lot more about overall power consumption and feature set - even if single-core performance has gone down (which it certainly has not from Sandy Bridge to Haswell) you just add more cores. If I was running several thousand cores I'd happily take a 5-10% loss in performance if it means a larger decrease in power and heat.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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But of course, it could send the Terminator back in time to buy more stock on amazon :) 

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I want to upgrade from my 2700K too but there's nothing really worth moving to.

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While this topic is here, how high has anyone been able to clock that i5-2xxx? I was one of the duds who got a bum i7-2600k and could never get a stable over clock above 4.2ghz. I took a gamble on buying an i7-4790k knowing that I wasn't going to see a huge jump in p3d performance. A month later I'm not regretting it. After a delidding and some fine tuning I have a stable 5.0ghz on lower voltage than the i7-2600k ever ran. And its showing in my Sim setup. P3d2.5, mytraffic6, pro-atc, all A2A GA planes, turbine duke v2, REX textures, asn weather, orbx world etc, paired with gtx970ssc, 16gb 2400gskill, Asus maximus vii hero, 1440p Korean monitor. No stutters, no artifacts, NO TWEAKS besides optimize parts=1, fps unlimited. Frames top out around 90, down to 42 in heavy traffic cities. Point is, you might get lucky and end up with one of those Intel chips that you can push to the limit, which was what they were suppose to be for. If you can get it cheap, that is!

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