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oneleg

New laptop, ONE internal hard drive. Where to install FSX?

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I know it is better to install FSX 10 in a separate drive and in a separate root folder.  But my new Windows 10 8-GB laptop has only one drive.  Should I install FSX in a different partition? Or just in the root of C:?  Thanks.

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You can install it on the default location, that's totally ok. Just be sure to run everything (especially addons installers) as admin and you won't have a problem ;)

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@Charliearon, Sorry. 8 GB RAM 1 TB hard disk.

 

@Stefano, the default location is at Program Files (86).  That's not generally advised but are you saying that is ok so long as I have admin rights when I install the programs?

 

So which is the better choice when you only have one drive in a laptop, FSX in a separate folder in the system partition C: or FSX on a separate partition like D:?

 

Thanks.

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Yeah, that's exactly what I'm saying. Just be careful when installing new things and you'll have no problem installing it at Program Files.

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There is a never-ending debate over installing FSX in the default location versus somewhere else. Some folks have had problems with the default location while others have not. But, I don't recall anyone ever having a problem with FSX when installed outside the default location. If it were me, I'd simply make a new folder, name it something like "C:\FSX", install it there, and avoid the whole issue.

 

Doug

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Go for C:\FSX.

 

Easy when entering path for addon programs. Program Files (x86) has special protection which is unnecessary for FSX.

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But, I don't recall anyone ever having a problem with FSX when installed outside the default location. If it were me, I'd simply make a new folder, name it something like "C:\FSX", install it there, and avoid the whole issue.

^^^Precisely this!

 

If I had a nickel for every post I've read over the years from people crying out in frustration that they can't save their edited panel.cfg or aircraft.cfg file, I'd have a fat 401k retirement account!

 

Yes, you can drag a copy to the desktop, edit it, save it, then drag the revised file back to the sim, but why should you have to go to such ridiculous extremes to edit/save a simple config file? :shok:

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I re-installed FSX yesterday, I also read you shouldn't install it into (Program Files x86), but ever since I got FSX about four years ago, nothing ever went wrong. Just make sure to start FSX as admin and you should be on your way!

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OK, that answers part 1 of the question. I'll install it in the root folder. Thank you. Next question, where do I install the FSX folder - in drive C: or in a separate partition (please note that this is a laptop with ONLY ONE internal disk drive and space is not an issue). Thanks.

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If you have an optical drive, you can replace that with a hard drive with an adaptor, preferably your current HDD, then get a SSD and fit that into where your hard drive once was. Also get a USB to SATA cable so you will still have an optical drive if needed.

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Don't partition. Install to C:\FSX.

 

+1. As Ray said, just create a folder called FSX on your C drive and install it there. There is absolutely no need to put FSX on a separate drive.

 

Doug

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Run as Admin, turn UAC down, & all will be perfect. That's how it is on my laptop, with 3x FS9's, & 1x P3D.

But then, that's just me & the way I've always done it. No partitions.

 

Please dont shout at me, this has always worked for me & the 20 odd PC's/laptops that I've installed the sims on. Never an issue.

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Actually Wobbie if the OP has the PC under his sole control and feels he is competent I would advocate turning UAC off. Those confirmation messages are an absolute pain designed to protect the novice but not seasoned computer users.

 

Regarding Admin your own account should be setup as an Administrator so there's no need to run programs as an Administrator. They'll run that way by default.

 

PS. I see some have quoted me with +1. There's a green Vote Up arrow for that very purpose for those who didn't notice it. :wink:

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Install under the root drive - especially in Win10.

 

DJ

This benefits how?  A statement like that sounds more like a requirement than a suggestion.  It can be argued that the install drive and path have certain impacts, both positive and negative.  If the OP has only one drive, the question has been beaten to death here at AVSIM on where to install.  AVSIM has a comprehensive manual outlining where to install the sim so then it begs the question of whether everyone follows that line of thinking.  For me, I have my sims in a separate drive.  Do I see a performance difference? No, not incredibly, by the standard of install paths but as for the type of drive, then yes.

 

Whether it's Windows 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 200, unless Microsoft changes the way UAC works, it is good practice to stay away from the root drive.  Consider that many people have quite a bit of content and never look forward to reinstalling everything if there is a drive failure, and yes, before other people tear up my post with misquotes, backups are always prudent, but then you get some folks who don't do backups.  Circular conversations abound.

 

-Jim

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I'm not going to argue about it - it's my recommendation. I do support and find that, many times, what is mucking up the works is MS security features coupled with user ignorance. Installing outside the so-called 'protected areas' of the file system bypasses those issues and has no other impact. The user in question has one drive - therefore the  root is the best place to install. You may do as you like.  If you don't do backups you will get burned no matter where you install your files.

 

DJ

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The user in question has one drive - therefore the  root is the best place to install. You may do as you like.  If you don't do backups you will get burned no matter where you install your files.

If by "root" you mean in a unique folder relative to the "root" then we are on the same page:

 

eg, x:\FSX (where x is whatever letter to which the root drive is assigned*)

 

* Nota bene: I've seen laptops with some strange drive letters assigned to the hard drive, such as "G"... I've no idea why the OEM decided that was a good idea. :db:

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If by "root" you mean in a unique folder relative to the "root" then we are on the same page:

 

eg, x:\FSX (where x is whatever letter to which the root drive is assigned*)

 

* Nota bene: I've seen laptops with some strange drive letters assigned to the hard drive, such as "G"... I've no idea why the OEM decided that was a good idea. :db:

 

I was given an old Acer desktop that my wife uses for email. Only one drive. It shows as "D". Go figure.....

 

Doug

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Hi, Fr. Bill

 

That is exactly what I meant by root... I've seen some odd drive letters too; I can't remember if it was Sony or Toshiba that did that.

 

DJ

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My laptop has one physical drive but:

 

Local Disk (C:)

Recovery (D:)

HP_Tools (E:)

 

Use only C: for applications.

 

C:\FSX never causes any problems: using C:Program files(x86) can. Why take the risk?

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Ok, installed in C:. Can someone explain why installing it in D: Is not advised (technical explanation if possible please).

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