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Yet another new PC Build - First time I've built - Opinions and abuse welcome!

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Hi there all,

 

After 8 years of using a Core 2 Duo laptop that died last year, it is finaly time for to build my first PC for FSX and P3D.

 

I use PMDG aircraft and would like to start using a bit more add-on scenery than I have been.

 

Here is what I am looking at:

 

Item          Description                                                                        Cost ($AUD)

CPU         Intel Core i7 6700K                                                                         524

Graphics  EVGA GeForce GTX 970 FTW+ ACX 2.0+ 4GB                             569

RAM         G.Skill Trident Z F4-3200CD16D-16GTZB 16GB (2x8GB) DDR     249

HD            Samsung 850 EVO Series 500GB 2.5in SSD                                 235

MOBO       Asus Z170I-Pro Gaming Motherboard                                           289

CPU Fan   Noctua NH-D15S Multi Socket CPU Cooler                                    125

Case fan   Fractal Design Dynamic GP-14 140mm Black Fan                          25

PSU           EVGA SuperNOVA G2 Gold 750W                                                159

Optical       Existing DVD burner  

Case          Fractal Designs Define R5  

 

Total cost $AUD 2175 ($USD 1160).

 

I am planning to do some overclocking, but have never done this before.  I already have the case, which has two 140mm fans included.

 

What I have got here is at the top end of what I can spend on the system, I would be happy to cut costs if I could, or spend on more SSD storage or a large storage hard drive.

 

Questions:

 

1) RAM - would G.Skill Ripjaws V 3000MHz ram reduce performance considerably, or is it best to go the best I can afford?  Have seen the tests with high-speed RAM by Saab340 but can't say I fully the results.  Is there much difference between Ripjaws and Trident apart from looks/heatsinks?

 

2) MOBO - is this motherboard sufficient - it says it can do up to 3400MHz OC for RAM - so would it run the 3200MHz RAM okay?

 

3) PSU - EVGA also have a B2 bronze 750W power supply - it is semi-modular - is there a huge advantage in terms of the modular deisgn in your opinions?  I realise bronze is less-efficient, but that doesn't worry me much.  Basically, will I get by safely and happily with the cheaper bronze power supply? (https://www.pccasegear.com/products/28100/evga-supernova-750w-b2-power-supply)

 

4) SSD - is it still a good idea to have FSX on a separate SSD drive from Windows?

 

5) Case fans - from my research, I have come to the conclusion that two intake fans at the front and one exhaust at the rear will be sufficient.  Any contradicting ideas?

 

I realise a lot of questions like this are posted here, but I would certainly appreciate any ideas, as this is my first build.

 

Thanks for any help you can offer!

 

Cheers,

Rudy

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Have also found a 2nd hand Nvidia 980 for sale that stil has ~2.5 years warranty left with it.  Not sure what the deal is with purchasing second hand graphics cards, but I'm a bit wary.  Mind you, I got a Radeon 9800 Pro second hand once upon a time, and that served me fine!

 

http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/melbourne-cbd/components/gigabyte-nvidia-geforce-gtx-980-4gb-windforce-graphics-card/1105285239

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Hi there all,

 

After 8 years of using a Core 2 Duo laptop that died last year, it is finaly time for to build my first PC for FSX and P3D.

 

I use PMDG aircraft and would like to start using a bit more add-on scenery than I have been.

 

Here is what I am looking at:

 

Item          Description                                                                        Cost ($AUD)

CPU         Intel Core i7 6700K                                                                         524

Graphics  EVGA GeForce GTX 970 FTW+ ACX 2.0+ 4GB                             569

RAM         G.Skill Trident Z F4-3200CD16D-16GTZB 16GB (2x8GB) DDR     249

HD            Samsung 850 EVO Series 500GB 2.5in SSD                                 235

MOBO       Asus Z170I-Pro Gaming Motherboard                                           289

CPU Fan   Noctua NH-D15S Multi Socket CPU Cooler                                    125

Case fan   Fractal Design Dynamic GP-14 140mm Black Fan                          25

PSU           EVGA SuperNOVA G2 Gold 750W                                                159

Optical       Existing DVD burner  

Case          Fractal Designs Define R5  

 

Total cost $AUD 2175 ($USD 1160).

 

I am planning to do some overclocking, but have never done this before.  I already have the case, which has two 140mm fans included.

 

What I have got here is at the top end of what I can spend on the system, I would be happy to cut costs if I could, or spend on more SSD storage or a large storage hard drive.

 

Questions:

 

1) RAM - would G.Skill Ripjaws V 3000MHz ram reduce performance considerably, or is it best to go the best I can afford?  Have seen the tests with high-speed RAM by Saab340 but can't say I fully the results.  Is there much difference between Ripjaws and Trident apart from looks/heatsinks?

 

2) MOBO - is this motherboard sufficient - it says it can do up to 3400MHz OC for RAM - so would it run the 3200MHz RAM okay?

 

3) PSU - EVGA also have a B2 bronze 750W power supply - it is semi-modular - is there a huge advantage in terms of the modular deisgn in your opinions?  I realise bronze is less-efficient, but that doesn't worry me much.  Basically, will I get by safely and happily with the cheaper bronze power supply? (https://www.pccasegear.com/products/28100/evga-supernova-750w-b2-power-supply)

 

4) SSD - is it still a good idea to have FSX on a separate SSD drive from Windows?

 

5) Case fans - from my research, I have come to the conclusion that two intake fans at the front and one exhaust at the rear will be sufficient.  Any contradicting ideas?

 

I realise a lot of questions like this are posted here, but I would certainly appreciate any ideas, as this is my first build.

 

Thanks for any help you can offer!

 

Cheers,

Rudy

 

Hi Rudy,

 

I have almost the same system as you do.

But I have slower RAM because 3200 wa snot on stock at that time, only DDR4 2400.

 

But: Do not worry about the ram.

Most overclocking guides state that the RAM speed is not too important for the whole system. With the 3000 Ram you should be good.

 

Here is a very good overclocking video for Skylake from the top overclocker in the world:

It is pretty simple... With the Noctua Fan you should be able to get the 4,5 GHz, all above this is hard to reach on the 6700k. You have to crank up the CPU voltage for more really hard (but always depends on "how good" your CPU is, different from CPU to CPU).

 

In my eyes 500 GB SSD is also sufficient, but it depends on how many games you want to install. If you really run out of harddrive space - buy another SSD later on :-)

 

To the 980 GTX: Most people say that you should get either a 970 GTX or a 980ti. The performance of the 980 can also be achieved by overclocking the 970. But this is only what I was reading!

 

To 4) I have P3D on the same SSD as Windows and have no trouble at all

 

5) I have exactly the same setup (Silent Base 800) and in my eyes this is really ok!

 

To 2): You are not making a mistake with the Asus Board. I use the Asus Z170-A and it is more then enough for me personally.

I am running at 4,4 GHz at the moment because my cooler is too bad (almost 90° under heavy load), but I have this already at home https://www.arctic.ac/de_de/liquid-freezer-240.html and will install it today or tomorrow.

 

All in all I would say: Nice system! Should be running really good. I personally use the M.2 interface on the board for the SSD, but this is not a very big game changer as SSD performance is not really necessary for FSX / P3D.

 

Hope this helps. :-)

 

PS: If you buy the Asus board and want to overclock then DO NOT install the AI Suite that comes with the mobo, it will alter your settings on its own which you do not want to happen :-)

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Hi there all,

 

After 8 years of using a Core 2 Duo laptop that died last year, it is finaly time for to build my first PC for FSX and P3D.

 

 

 

Cheers,

Rudy

 

 

 

 

I like your choices, if they were ladies I would give them a big snog!

 

 

 RAM - would G.Skill Ripjaws V 3000MHz ram reduce performance considerably

 

No, it wouldn't. I have Ripjaw V 3200, but 3000 would be just dandy too.

 

2) MOBO - is this motherboard sufficient - it says it can do up to 3400MHz OC for RAM - so would it run the 3200MHz RAM okay?

 

You can never say for sure. The voltage controller is now on the board rather than CPU, and the silicone lottery still applies, all systems vary. 3200, or 3000 MHz should be achievable though with your chosen board. 

 

 

3) PSU - EVGA also have a B2 bronze 750W power supply - it is semi-modular - is there a huge advantage in terms of the modular deisgn in your opinions?  I realise bronze is less-efficient, but that doesn't worry me much.  Basically, will I get by safely and happily with the cheaper bronze power supply? (https://www.pccasege...b2-power-

supply)

 

 

Bronze won't make a huge difference to the waste heat generated or to your electricity bill. So if you are strapped for cash you could go bronze. Semi-modular is fine. The cables that are hard wired to the PSU are the ones we all need anyway. One of the reasons it baffles me why they make fully modular PSU's. I suppose for those that wish to swap out all cables for fancy ones it's an advantage. My Enermax is semi-modular, you are good to go with semi-modular.

 

I favour multi-rail PSU's though, yours is single rail. I can go into that more if your request.

 

 

4) SSD - is it still a good idea to have FSX on a separate SSD drive from Windows?

 

I've never done that to no ill effect. Don't think it's required at all these days.

 

 

5) Case fans - from my research, I have come to the conclusion that two intake fans at the front and one exhaust at the rear will be sufficient.  Any contradicting ideas?

 

I could spend all day discussing positive or negative case pressure, but essentially with the scenario you mention you would have positive case pressure. Your GPU will no doubt exhaust too, and I'm not sure about your PSU orientation, up or down, so that's also a consideration. But from what I can tell without further info, a slight positive pressure it appears to be. Which is fine, minimizes dust ingress and will still cool efficiently. We ALL over cool our PC's, even when we overclock, so don't worry.

 

 

It is pretty simple... With the Noctua Fan you should be able to get the 4,5 GHz, all above this is hard to reach on the 6700k. You have to crank up the CPU voltage for more really hard (but always depends on "how good" your CPU is, different from CPU to CPU).

 

Above 4.5 is not hard to reach! 4.6 - 4.8 is achievable for most, and at or below the max voltage recommended by Asus and Intel.

 

 

PS: If you buy the Asus board and want to overclock then DO NOT install the AI Suite that comes with the mobo, it will alter your settings on its own which you do not want to happen :-)

 

 

 

 

Not true, Ai Suite won't change your setting all on it's own.There are many useful features within Ai Suite that the OP might like. 5 Way Optimization is pretty good these days.

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Above 4.5 is not hard to reach! 4.6 - 4.8 is achievable for most, and at or below the max voltage recommended by Asus and Intel.

 

 

 

 

 

Not true, Ai Suite won't change your setting all on it's own.There are many useful features within Ai Suite that the OP might like. 5 Way Optimization is pretty good these days.

 

My personal experience and all I read about it is that everything above 4.5 GHz will require more Core Voltage. I am running 4,4 GHz @ 1,3 Volt at the moment, everything below this makes Prime95 freeze instantly. But it depends on the quliaty of the CPU.

 

And yes, AI Suite changes settings in the UEFI directly. But if you like it how it works - ok! For myself the AI Suite has nothing for me which I cannot do manually with more control.

Sure, if you like the "1-click-tuning" then it's ok.

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Unless you specifically want a "quiet" case, consider a Phanteks Enthoo Pro. I have the window-less version and it's the same price as the R5. It's a full tower so you'd need to check you have the space but it's very easy to work in and has good airflow with the supplied fans.

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My personal experience and all I read about it is that everything above 4.5 GHz will require more Core Voltage. I am running 4,4 GHz @ 1,3 Volt at the moment, everything below this makes Prime95 freeze instantly. But it depends on the quliaty of the CPU.

 

And yes, AI Suite changes settings in the UEFI directly. But if you like it how it works - ok! For myself the AI Suite has nothing for me which I cannot do manually with more control.

Sure, if you like the "1-click-tuning" then it's ok.

 

 

Of course everything above 4.5 GHz will require more voltage. That's just basic overclocking. But it's not an issue with appropriate cooling. Increasing voltage when overclocking is basic, acceptable, normal procedure.

 

 

Of course AI Suite alters setting in ther UEFI, it's a hardware, software and firmware overclock. But you said... 

 

 

 

DO NOT install the AI Suite that comes with the mobo, it will alter your settings on its own 

 

 

No it won't alter settings"on it's own". You have to tell it to do so. 

 

Perhaps there's a language barrier at work, thus the confusion.

 

 

Sure, if you like the "1-click-tuning" then it's ok.

 

 

 

In which case you shouldn't have said...

 

 

 

Asus board and want to overclock then DO NOT install the AI Suite 

 

 

 

Yes it is okay. But it's not "one click", 5 way optimisation requires a number of settings to be made. It's not the same as TPU 1 and 2. Once the settings are made 5WO will overclock the same way you do manually.

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Hi guys,

 

Thanks very much for your informative and helpful replies!

 

Vortex, I already have the case (the only bit I do have at the moment), but thanks for the suggestion - looks like a nice case.

 

Cheers, Stefan, I think I will use the M.2 connector for the SSD as well.  Regarding space, I will only really have FSX/P3D on it, so I shouldn't be pushed for space just yet.  If I do get tight, you're right, I can just get another SSD down the track.  Glad to hear you have a similar system, and with regards to the motherboard, it's good you're doing well on the Z170A.  Was hoping I wouldn't need to get a ASUS ROG mobo, as much as I'd like one, I'd also like to go on holiday this year!  Thanks for your help!

 

Good to know about the RAM and case fans, Martin.  Yeah I think I've read somewhere you prefer the multi-rail PSUs - why is that and any particular ones you like best?

 

A big thanks again guys, it's good to get a bit of feedback after you finally start to get an idea of what you're getting after many hours/days of reading!

 

Cheers,

Rudy

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Stand by for opinions lol

 

1) skylake likes fast ram - and I hear 4 sticks is great as well

 

2) your proposed mobo is fine

 

3) if you have a large case with plenty of room semi modular is plenty. I went fully modular and I use a corsair 650d - wish I would have not gone modular - I could have stuck the whole wad of cabling behind my mobo - organizational wise with my fully modular PSU it's worse lol

 

4) I think the fastest combo is FSX and OS on one non partitioned SSD. That's my hypothesis and I've got no science to prove it

 

5) not sure on the fans

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First, https://pcpartpicker.com/ is a big help in building a system (I don't see any issues with your system except for maybe the RAM).

 

1) Before you decide on any RAM to go the ASUS support page for the motherboard you want to purchase and make sure the exact model of RAM you want to use is on the Preferred Vendors List. Really important if you want RAM that will run at full rated speed in your MB.

 

2) Motherboard is a good one.

 

3) Don't skimp on the PSU. I personally prefer fully modular but if you found a good deal on a semi-modular go for it.

 

4) No opinion.

 

5) Two intakes in the front and one exhaust in the rear is perfect. My guess is with that CPU cooler you should be able to OC to 4.5GHz and keep the temps around 70c while running FSX.

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Good to know about the RAM and case fans, Martin.  Yeah I think I've read somewhere you prefer the multi-rail PSUs - why is that and any particular ones you like best?

 

 

 

Cheers,

Rudy

 

 

 

Single rail PSU's are just as good as multi-rail PSU's Rudy, in terms of their performance. However, multi-rail PSU's tend to be safer, as there's  less chance of damage to other PC components if there's a failure.

 

For example, a single rail 750 watt PSU will have the over-current trip point set at something like 60 amps. At such a high amperage, it's conceivable that other PC components will fail prior to OCP tripping. There are other safeguards in place, like short circuit protection, but they do fail on occasion.

 

In reality, the PSU's on the market these days are all single rail, but in a multi-rail designs that single rail is further split into sub rails all protected by OCP [Over Current Protection]. As the multi-rail PSU is divided into sub rails the OCP trip point is a lot lower. Something like 25 amps per sub rail. So there's far less chance of damage to other PC components, far more likely the PSU will safely shut down before that point.

 

It's not a huge deal, there are many PSU manufacturers that market high amperage single rail designs, and many customers are perfectly happy, so I'd never be too adamant that multi-rail is the way to go. It's personal choice, but it is a fact that multi-rail offers better protection.

 

My favorite currently is the Enermax Platimax series. I have one in my old PC and one ready fro my Skylake build.

 

Something you do have to consider with multi-rail designs is  where you plug in the PCIe cables.  If there are two, they should be fed from two different rails to ensure enough amps for the card. No big deal, they are clearly labeled.

 

5) Two intakes in the front and one exhaust in the rear is perfect. My guess is with that CPU cooler you should be able to OC to 4.5GHz and keep the temps around 70c while running FSX.

 

 

Better than that I suspect actually. The NH-D15S performs better than the old D14, and only two degrees warmer than the NH-D15.

 

It has one fan instead of two. But no big deal. Two fans make very little difference on our big tower coolers. Simply because the velocity of air passing through the heat sink is the same. All two fans or more offers is slightly higher static pressure, thus the slight improvement in cooling.

 

It has to be said, that we Noctua fans who have been running our D14's and 15's with two fans have been doing so for almost no gain.Two degrees is nothing in the grand scheme of things.

 

4.6 - 4.8 GHz, dependent on the silicone lottery, is within the Noctua NH-D15S's capability to handle. At 4.7GHz for example, I wouldn't be surprised to see sub 70 degrees running FSX. Once again that's dependent on the silicone lottery.

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Perhaps there's a language barrier at work, thus the confusion.

 

 

I think so, esentially we are talking about the same and have the same opinion ;)

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Hey guys, thank-you all very much for your help!

 

I am going to look into a multi-rail PSU (will try having a look at cost for the brand you suggested), Martin.  I think I too prefer the idea of a multi-rail PSU.  Thanks for the detailed info.  Also glad to see you like the NH-D15S!  I've noticed you're a bit of a fan...get.it?...haha!

 

Good to know not everyone is a fully-modular fan, Ryan.  Yeah, I think I'm going to go with one non-partitioned SSD.

 

Cheers for the RAM heads-up, Wing. 

 

I've had a look at the QVL list for the motherboard - I am actually going to get the Z170 Pro Gaming rather than the Z170i Pro Gaming - has more PCI slots so I can stick wireless cards in or whatever.  They don't suggest many different types of RAM in the QVL list, and nearly all of it is 4x4GB for 16GB.  I think I'd rather 2x8GB than 4x4GB, I've heard 2x8GB is better?  I've been having a look G.Skill's memory configurator which matches RAM to the motherboard so maybe will go by that.

 

Again, reading your discussions and your input is very helpful, thank-you all very much/

 

Cheers,

Rudy

 

PS apologies for my delayed reply, was at work all day yesterday and I hate typing anything more than a few words on my phone!

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I am going to look into a multi-rail PSU (will try having a look at cost for the brand you suggested), Martin. I think I too prefer the idea of a multi-rail PSU. Thanks for the detailed info. Also glad to see you like the NH-D15S! I've noticed you're a bit of a fan...get.it?...haha!

 

 

 

Nice video on multi-rail and single rail here...

 

 

 

Nice that Corsair offer the option of single or multi-rail, selectable in their "Link" software. That's the "i" designated PSU's of course.

 

 

Also glad to see you like the NH-D15S!  I've noticed you're a bit of a fan...get.it?...haha!

 

 

 

Love Noctua to be honest. As soon as you pull them out of the box the quality blows you away. Nice spring mounting system to absorb dynamic load, nice big, secure backplate. Love em.

 

 They don't suggest many different types of RAM in the QVL list, and nearly all of it is 4x4GB for 16GB.  I think I'd rather 2x8GB than 4x4GB, I've heard 2x8GB is better?  I've been having a look G.Skill's memory configurator which matches RAM to the motherboard so maybe will go by that.

 

 

I would recomend either the Trident Z you originally linked to, or Ripjaw V. GSkill designed Trident Z and Ripjaw V specificity for Skylake, they also use top quality Samsung modules. I went fro 3200, but 3000 would be nice too.

 

I agree in regard to two sticks instead of 4. Two is better. However, not to the extent it used to be. You can actually achieve good overclocking results with four sticks with Skylake. To be on the safe side I too would go for two sticks though.

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Multi rail continued.

 

The easiest way to look at it is a follows... If you imagine a short circuit on the 12 volt rail, and the short circuit protection fails to catch it in time. The draw on the 12 volt wire and 12 volt PSU circuit board trace will increase until the OCP trip point is reached or until something vital burns out. It could be your motherboard, it could be the cable, it could be the PSU itself. If it happens to be a hefty single rail PSU, above 650 watts, then something usually burns before OCP cuts in.

 

In a multi rail PSU, the current climbs until it hits the lower OCP trip point and then shuts down to protect itself and your other PC components.

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For your information:

 

I installed an AIO watercooling system on the weekend and get around 10-15°C cooler temps compraed to my former Alpenföhn Brocken 2.

https://www.arctic.ac/de_de/liquid-freezer-240.html -> easy to install, not very expensive, very good temps.

 

@martin: But I cannot get more than 4,5 GHz stable. No chance. No matter what i do... And even with 4,5 GHz @ 1,34V I had a freeze in P3D after about 2 hours.

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For your information:

 

I installed an AIO watercooling system on the weekend and get around 10-15°C cooler temps compraed to my former Alpenföhn Brocken 2.

https://www.arctic.ac/de_de/liquid-freezer-240.html -> easy to install, not very expensive, very good temps.

 

@martin: But I cannot get more than 4,5 GHz stable. No chance. No matter what i do... And even with 4,5 GHz @ 1,34V I had a freeze in P3D after about 2 hours.

 

 

 

1.34 volts isn't particularly high. Asus and Intel recommend a maximum of 1.45 volts for Skylake. So you do have more headroom to increase voltage further to increase stability. This will be dependant on your CPU temperature of course.

 

What sort of temp are you seeing at 4.5 GHz and 1.34 volts, under load? Do you have any more headroom in terms of CPU temperature? 

 

It also depends how you manually overclocked. Did you set the RAM XMP profile before or after overcloking? If you set it before, and the memory controller on your board isn't as capable as we would like, it would limit your CPU overclock. Best idea is to overclock your CPU first, and then try the XMP profile. If not successful, then it's an easy task to drop the RAM frequency until stable. Otherwise you are sacrificing CPU frequency to run your RAM at a higher frequency. Just a suggestion, it could of course be that your board is perfectly capable of handing the higher RAM frequency without compromising the max CPU overclock... it's all down to the silicone lottery.

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Temps are no problem. I get around 65°-70° (which is by the way the same temp I get when running P3D at 4,3 GHz, somehow the temps when running P3D are higher then in Prime95 with custom settings to 1344 and FFT in place) while running Prime95 at 4.5 GHz.

I read that no more than 1.4 Volts is recommended for daily use. Where do you have the 1.45V from? If that's true: Yes, then I have enough room to overclock! :-)

 

I think I set the XMP profile before the tuning. But I guess I will go for the higher voltage first.

 

But tonight I wanna make a long haul from VHHH to EDDM so I set back the frequency to 4,3 GHz as I am FULLY stable there at the moment.

 

Edit: Just tried 4.6 GHz with 1.4V and XMP off -> 80° in Prime95 and a freeze after about 3 minutes. :-/

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Temps are no problem. I get around 65°-70° (which is by the way the same temp I get when running P3D at 4,3 GHz, somehow the temps when running P3D are higher then in Prime95 with custom settings to 1344 and FFT in place) while running Prime95 at 4.5 GHz.

 

 

I have no experience of P3D, but yes, I've heard temps are higher in P3D. P3D seems like a great way to test for thermals then.

 

 

I read that no more than 1.4 Volts is recommended for daily use. Where do you have the 1.45V from? If that's true: Yes, then I have enough room to overclock! :-)

 

 

Quoted in numerous places.You will also find that Asus's 5 way optimization sets this as the max voltage. 

 

 

There is no official word on a safe CPU core voltage. But it is widely accepted that you shouldn’t exceed 1.45V If you’re the type of user who likes to play it safe, then keep it under 1.4V

 

 

http://rog.asus.com/454262015/overclocking/guide-overclocking-core-i7-6700k-on-the-maximus-viii-extreme/

 

 

Then I decided to push further, and was able to complete a set of three test runs at 4.9GHz. That was only possible with the CPU Core Voltage at a whopping 1.43, which is pretty high (Asus and Intel documents recommended a maximum of 1.45V).

 

 

http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/overclocking-intel-core-i7-6700k/

 

 

 

It is recommended with the Skylake processors to not exceed 1.45v, so 1.4v on a daily overclocked machine should* be safe. 

 

 

 

http://www.eteknix.com/intel-core-i7-6700k-i5-6600k-skylake-processors-review/2/

 

Obviously it's your CPU though, so if you choose to increase voltage it's at your own discretion and risk.

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Edit: Just tried 4.6 GHz with 1.4V and XMP off -> 80° in Prime95 and a freeze after about 3 minutes. :-/

 

 

 

When you say "XMP off", what was the RAM frequency? 

 

Could be of course that you have a very bad chip for overclocking, could be that the silicone lottery didn't do you any favors. Most can achieve between 4.6 and 4.8.

 

Of course I have no idea what settings you used in the BIOS.If I were you i'd set everything to optimized defaults and alter just the absolute minimum of settings. Nothing fancy.

 

I would also suggest that you install Ai Suite, and run 5 way optimization. Just to see what sort of overclock it generates.

 

Or you could simply set everything to optimized defaults... and then flip the TPU switch on the motherboard. This is just a generic non stress tested overclock, a "one size fits all" overclock if you will. But it should give us an idea what sort of overclocking capability your chip has. With good cooling, most chips should be able to handle TPU 2. This should give you 4.6 GHz.

 

 

What was the AIO cooler you installed by the way?

 

What's the make and frequency of your RAM. Don't forget, some of the older DDR4 kits caused issues with Skylake.

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When you say "XMP off", what was the RAM frequency? 

 

Could be of course that you have a very bad chip for overclocking, could be that the silicone lottery didn't do you any favors. Most can achieve between 4.6 and 4.8.

 

Of course I have no idea what settings you used in the BIOS.If I were you i'd set everything to optimized defaults and alter just the absolute minimum of settings. Nothing fancy.

 

I would also suggest that you install Ai Suite, and run 5 way optimization. Just to see what sort of overclock it generates.

 

Or you could simply set everything to optimized defaults... and then flip the TPU switch on the motherboard. This is just a generic non stress tested overclock, a "one size fits all" overclock if you will. But it should give us an idea what sort of overclocking capability your chip has. With good cooling, most chips should be able to handle TPU 2. This should give you 4.6 GHz.

 

 

What was the AIO cooler you installed by the way?

 

The RAM frequency was set to 2400 as far as I remember which should be ok.

I can run the 4.5 GHz stable at the moment but as the CPU isn't the bottleneck most of the time (except for P3D) I run it in daily use at 4.3 GHz with lower Voltage.

 

This is ok for me :-)

If my chip isn't willing to give me 4.6 GHz or more that's also ok for me :-)

 

I installed the Arctic Liquid Freezer 240 and the temps it gives me are pretty good. I read a lot about AIO solutions before buying it and was not really sure as there are some negative comments.

But in my eyes it is worth the money. 70 Euros is ok I would say.

But it is a little bit louder than an air cooler as you have the fans "outside" of the case and with the Arctic you have 4 coolers.

 

But I don't really care about noise as I always use a headset.

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This is ok for me :-)

If my chip isn't willing to give me 4.6 GHz or more that's also ok for me :-)

 

 

 

It does happen I'm afraid. As I said, most achieve at least 4.6, but on occasion some chips just won't do it. My old 3770K was a very bad overclocker.

 

I would suggest you try the TPU switch though, or 5 way optimization. After setting back to defaults. That way we know that if it still doesn't achieve a reasonable overclock, that it is the chip and not something you have done wrong.

 

Also make sure you are using the latest BIOS.There are usually tons of tweaks, plenty of performance tweaks with new platforms.

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