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Hi everyone.

 

So it is about time for me to make a new build, I've a good budget and it will be with euros price, so I'm not really looking at prices right now but more at the set of components.

 

So here is the plan of what I think I will get:

 

Processor : Intel Core i7-6700k

 

Cooler : I'm thinking about some easy watercooler self contained system. But nothing is set in stone yet, But I'd like a bit less noise :P

 

Motherboard : A Z170 based mother board not sure which one yet, but it would be great to have OC possibility in an easy way. I'm not looking at a too high OC, I was pretty happy with my current OC from 3.8 to 4.2 just by changing the turboboost settings in the bios.

Also I absolutely need a legacy PCI port (1 is enough) as I've an old but still pretty good Create X-Fi card which decodes Dolby/Dts (which none of hteir newest card have) and that have a nice bay in the front to have easy access for plugging headphones and mic.

 

GPU : Nvidia 1080 GTX 

 

Memory, Some good DDR4 for probably 16GB, not sure about going up to 32GB. 

 

And at least two SSDs (probably 1 of 256GB for the OS, and a 512GB for the sims FSX, X-Plane, and maybe some big games from time to time but not permanently), and a good old physical drive of 2 or 3TB for all the other stuffs.

 

Not really decided on the rest case, power supply, so could take advice, only things I want to check are : 

* classical case, no need for tuning/fancy stuff, simple visualy but efficient

* Modular powersupply so that it is better for cable management.

 

Some components like the GTX 1080 are obviously overkill for the sims I know it, but I'm also playing quite a bit, and I'm planning on spending enough for a hardware that will keep going on for several years. 

 

The budget I've planned is around 2000$ which should be enough I think for this build.

 

My current configuration was built with the following :

Core i5-3570k

Gigabyte Z77X-UD5H

GeForce GTX 680

8GB DDR 3 Ram

 

I keep nothing but my soundcard as it will become a computer for my wife :)

 

Thanks for your advices, on the parts, I know about what I want but selecting some components is not always the easy part, such as to find what really is different between two equivalent motherboards, ...

 

Cheers !

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wow!!!!lots of money there.

 

Yeah well my current computer last me 4 years I want to go for about the same time before changing again ;) I prefer a big change every few years than a little every time something new is here :) And If I get all that I need for smaller price I'll go with it too I just spared little by little so I could make this  :)

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wow!!!!lots of money there.

$2000 isn't a lot.It's pretty standard for a reasonable PC.

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$2000 isn't a lot.It's pretty standard for a reasonable PC.

 

You price that rig out at a $2000.00 build?  How so or through who?  Im interests in this type of build also for myself.

Thanks in advance.

David Bell

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When are you planning on purchasing?

 

The 1080 may be available by the end of the month but only the reference design from nVidia. Volume cards from good names like evga might take awhile longer.

 

Get a solid PSU like seasonic. For single video card, even a 1080, you won't need more than 650W.

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You price that rig out at a $2000.00 build?  How so or through who?  Im interests in this type of build also for myself.

Thanks in advance.

David Bell

 

 

 

I didn't price anything out at anything. I just remarked that "bthiago's" incredulity at what he perceived as a high end expenditure is misplaced. I just remarked that $2000, or £1380 in my money, isn't exceptional for a powerful PC. As for "who through", I always refer to self-build, as that's my preference.

 

I went for...

 

Lian Li X510 - This is the big variable of course. You can buy a case for a few pounds or many hundreds of pounds. My preference is for high end aluminium enclosures.

 

Intel i7 6700K

 

Noctua NH-D15S - I don't favour AIO water coolers. I prefer large tower heat sinks that have zero chance of leaks, no chance of a pump becoming noisy or failing and are quiet. The Noctua enables high overclocks with little noise.

 

Windows 10 - Don't sim much these days, so any incompatibility with W10 and flight sim is less of an issue.

 

Asus Z170-A - Didn't need anything more than this. It overclocks well, seems reliable and has all the features I desire. Good price too.

 

GKill Ripjaw V 3200 MHz. GSkill use top-notch Samsung modules and designed the RAM specifically with Skylake in mind. Great RAM.

 

EVGA GTX 980Ti Classified - Was considering the Kingpin, but a bit pricey and the 980Ti is enough. may switch to the new Nvidia architecture some time in the future. EVGA, so great support and reliability. 

 

Samsung 850 Evo 1TB - Didn't need anything more. Didn't really need M.2 or U.2. Fast enough for now and reliable. I don't subscribe to the multi drive philosophy, not necessary these days in my opinion.

 

Enermax 850 Watt multi-rail PSU - More wattage than I really need but has the advantage of hitting the most efficient 50% range the majority of the time. Multi-rail as it's less likely to damage other components in the system if the short circuit protection fails. This is due to a lower OCP trip point per rail, compared with a single rail PSU.

 

I should add that the Enermax PSU is a "semi-modular" PSU. I don't see the point in fully modular PSU's. We all need certain cables, and they are the cables attached to a semi-modular PSU. Different story if you wish to replace all the cables with fancy coloured ones of course.

 

Samsung Portable Blue-ray writer - My Lian Li enclosure has no optical drive facility, so opted for an external drive for the rare occasions I use optical media. 

 

Still to buy keyboard, mouse and monitor. 

 

Those were my choices and thought process.

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When are you planning on purchasing?

 

The 1080 may be available by the end of the month but only the reference design from nVidia. Volume cards from good names like evga might take awhile longer.

 

Get a solid PSU like seasonic. For single video card, even a 1080, you won't need more than 650W.

 

Thanks the date is not really planned yet, I'm in the process of selecting components so it could wait for several GTX 1080 cards to be available to I can make my choice, I'll also keep on my toe a bit for the reviews and benchmarks.

 

I didn't price anything out at anything. I just remarked that "bthiago's" incredulity at what he perceived as a high end expenditure is misplaced. I just remarked that $2000, or £1380 in my money, isn't exceptional for a powerful PC. As for "who through", I always refer to self-build, as that's my preference.

 

I went for...

 

Lian Li X510 - This is the big variable of course. You can buy a case for a few pounds or many hundreds of pounds. My preference is for high end aluminium enclosures.

 

Intel i7 6700K

 

Noctua NH-D15S - I don't favour AIO water coolers. I prefer large tower heat sinks that have zero chance of leaks, no chance of a pump becoming noisy or failing and are quiet. The Noctua enables high overclocks with little noise.

 

Windows 10 - Don't sim much these days, so any incompatibility with W10 and flight sim is less of an issue.

 

Asus Z170-A - Didn't need anything more than this. It overclocks well, seems reliable and has all the features I desire. Good price too.

 

GKill Ripjaw V 3200 MHz. GSkill use top-notch Samsung modules and designed the RAM specifically with Skylake in mind. Great RAM.

 

EVGA GTX 980Ti Classified - Was considering the Kingpin, but a bit pricey and the 980Ti is enough. may switch to the new Nvidia architecture some time in the future. EVGA, so great support and reliability. 

 

Samsung 850 Evo 1TB - Didn't need anything more. Didn't really need M.2 or U.2. Fast enough for now and reliable. I don't subscribe to the multi drive philosophy, not necessary these days in my opinion.

 

Enermax 850 Watt multi-rail PSU - More wattage than I really need but has the advantage of hitting the most efficient 50% range the majority of the time. Multi-rail as it's less likely to damage other components in the system if the short circuit protection fails. This is due to a lower OCP trip point per rail, compared with a single rail PSU.

 

I should add that the Enermax PSU is a "semi-modular" PSU. I don't see the point in fully modular PSU's. We all need certain cables, and they are the cables attached to a semi-modular PSU. Different story if you wish to replace all the cables with fancy coloured ones of course.

 

Samsung Portable Blue-ray writer - My Lian Li enclosure has no optical drive facility, so opted for an external drive for the rare occasions I use optical media. 

 

Still to buy keyboard, mouse and monitor. 

 

Those were my choices and thought process.

 

Thanks a ;lot, the noctua seems a good point too, I'll look into that has well, though I need to be careful selecting the case as it seems very big, maybe bigger than my current Hyper EVO 212.

 

I probably wont go for the Lian Li, as it seems unavailble at the moment, and also without optical drive that would not be good for me, I'll have an opical drive internal is better for me, but more importanly my X-Fi rack needs a freebay :) But I don't really look after a great design, or weight or things like this just that it should be functionnal, with ease for setting up things inside, and placing cables. And some degree of noise reduction stuffs.

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I probably wont go for the Lian Li, as it seems unavailble at the moment, and also without optical drive that would not be good for me, I'll have an opical drive internal is better for me, but more importanly my X-Fi rack needs a freebay :) But I don't really look after a great design, or weight or things like this just that it should be functionnal, with ease for setting up things inside, and placing cables. And some degree of noise reduction stuffs.

 

The Phanteks Enthoo Pro case is excellent for a self build system - see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBhmn21ylkc. It's very easy to work in and takes almost any cooler you'd want to fit (I have the Corsair H110i GT with room to spare). Easy to hide away all of your cables for a clean build and it's great value for money. I went for the non-windowed version as it sits under my desk (this version also has no PSU cover). It's a large case so you'd need to check you have the space for it. Highly recommended

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I didn't price anything out at anything. I just remarked that "bthiago's" incredulity at what he perceived as a high end expenditure is misplaced. I just remarked that $2000, or £1380 in my money, isn't exceptional for a powerful PC. As for "who through", I always refer to self-build, as that's my preference.

 

I went for...

 

Lian Li X510 - This is the big variable of course. You can buy a case for a few pounds or many hundreds of pounds. My preference is for high end aluminium enclosures.

 

Intel i7 6700K

 

Noctua NH-D15S - I don't favour AIO water coolers. I prefer large tower heat sinks that have zero chance of leaks, no chance of a pump becoming noisy or failing and are quiet. The Noctua enables high overclocks with little noise.

 

Windows 10 - Don't sim much these days, so any incompatibility with W10 and flight sim is less of an issue.

 

Asus Z170-A - Didn't need anything more than this. It overclocks well, seems reliable and has all the features I desire. Good price too.

 

GKill Ripjaw V 3200 MHz. GSkill use top-notch Samsung modules and designed the RAM specifically with Skylake in mind. Great RAM.

 

EVGA GTX 980Ti Classified - Was considering the Kingpin, but a bit pricey and the 980Ti is enough. may switch to the new Nvidia architecture some time in the future. EVGA, so great support and reliability. 

 

Samsung 850 Evo 1TB - Didn't need anything more. Didn't really need M.2 or U.2. Fast enough for now and reliable. I don't subscribe to the multi drive philosophy, not necessary these days in my opinion.

 

Enermax 850 Watt multi-rail PSU - More wattage than I really need but has the advantage of hitting the most efficient 50% range the majority of the time. Multi-rail as it's less likely to damage other components in the system if the short circuit protection fails. This is due to a lower OCP trip point per rail, compared with a single rail PSU.

 

I should add that the Enermax PSU is a "semi-modular" PSU. I don't see the point in fully modular PSU's. We all need certain cables, and they are the cables attached to a semi-modular PSU. Different story if you wish to replace all the cables with fancy coloured ones of course.

 

Samsung Portable Blue-ray writer - My Lian Li enclosure has no optical drive facility, so opted for an external drive for the rare occasions I use optical media. 

 

Still to buy keyboard, mouse and monitor. 

 

Those were my choices and thought process.

 

That is a beautiful set up.  I could cut and paste every item into a wish list for my own FS rig.  I also appreciate that you explained the specific reasons why you went with each individual item.  

Your choice for a cooler is interesting as it wasn't the direction I was headed.  However, it does make sense, so I will do more research before I pull the trigger on any eventual purchase.

I am most impressed by your articulation and vocabulary though.  Your use of the word "incredulity" is perfect.  I have to try to incorporate that word into my daily diction.  

In all seriousness Martin-w I appreciate your direction and explanations.  Very wise.

Best regards.

David Bell

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Thanks a ;lot, the noctua seems a good point too, I'll look into that has well, though I need to be careful selecting the case as it seems very big, maybe bigger than my current Hyper EVO 212.

 

 

 

 

 

Oh yes, way, way bigger than your Hyper 212! Surface area is a major consideration in regard to cooling. 

 

If you decide to go big air instead of AIO, these are the dimensions of the D15S...

 

http://noctua.at/en/products/cpu-cooler-retail/nh-d15s/specification

 

Don't be concerned that it has only one 150mm fan. Two fans make very little difference, just two degrees. Many that run with multi fan set-ups, on air coolers or push/pull on AIO, aren't aware of how little difference it makes. What extra fans do though is increase noise. The important factor is the velocity of the air that passes through the heat sink or radiator. Extra fans don't increase that velocity, all they do is increase static pressure slightly. And of course, in regard to the D15S, if desired and extra fan can be fitted.

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That is a beautiful set up.  I could cut and paste every item into a wish list for my own FS rig.  I also appreciate that you explained the specific reasons why you went with each individual item.  

Your choice for a cooler is interesting as it wasn't the direction I was headed.  However, it does make sense, so I will do more research before I pull the trigger on any eventual purchase.

I am most impressed by your articulation and vocabulary though.  Your use of the word "incredulity" is perfect.  I have to try to incorporate that word into my daily diction.  

In all seriousness Martin-w I appreciate your direction and explanations.  Very wise.

Best regards.

David Bell

 

 

 

Thanks David. I prefer to steer clear of simply listing each component. "Why" is important in my opinion. Just because a choice is right for my needs, doesn't make it right for the needs of others. 

 

Some like to just copy others choices, others that they deem more experienced, usually due to intellectual laziness, but I'd much rather encourage others to think for themselves, consider their own needs, decide if the choices I've made are right for them or wrong for them.

 

The same applies to any technical explanations I attempt to provide. Accept them, or reject them if you think they aren't valid, I don't mind witch, but hopefully I'm encouraging people to think for themselves. It helps me too as I often make a balls up, when I do and someone puts me on the right track I appreciate it. I will argue vociferously though before I concede, not to be argumentative, just to establish the facts.  

 

 

 

That is a beautiful set up.  I could cut and paste every item into a wish list for my own FS rig.

 

 

 

To be honest I'm getting very frustrated. Ordered the parts ages ago, but we are currently refurbishing my daughters bedroom, after that it's my bedroom. So I have all the parts ready to build but nowhere to put the PC. Why is it that these jobs always cost twice as much and take twice as long? Forget dark energy and dark matter, the DIY conundrum is the real mystery of the universe. 

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I probably wont go for the Lian Li, as it seems unavailble at the moment, and also without optical drive that would not be good for me, 

 

 

To be honest, the only thing I don't like about the X510 is the PSU mounting. As is the trend these days, the fan is pointing down, sucking air in through the bottom of the case. Trouble is, Lian Li design the vents like a sort of almost closed Venetian blind. Canted slats is the way I'd describe it. so when you add the restriction provided by the filer, I fail to see how the PSU can draw much air through that arrangement.

 

I can see why Lian Li designed it that way. If you are going to point PSU fans down, then you need to consider the eventuality of a PSU failure dropping sparks or indeed in some rare scenarios flames, down onto flammable material beneath the case. Rare but it has happened. No doubt this is why Lian Li went for this canted vent restrictive design.

 

Lian Li do mount the PSU about one centimeter above the case floor of course,to aid airflow into the PSU. So in other words most of the air is sucked into the PSU from inside the case anyway, negating the entire point of a downward facing PSU.

 

Anyway, so as to not ramble on too muich... I drilled out the rivets, and removed the bottom PSU compartment divider. So now I can mount the PSU the sensible way... UP!. This was the PSU mounting arrangement for literally decades that always worked well, why on Earth case manufactures adopted this PSU fan down fad god only knows.

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Anyway, so as to not ramble on too muich... I drilled out the rivets, and removed the bottom PSU compartment divider. So now I can mount the PSU the sensible way... UP!. This was the PSU mounting arrangement for literally decades that always worked well, why on Earth case manufactures adopted this PSU fan down fad god only knows.

 

But for years mounting the PSU at the top of the case (with the fan facing downwards) was taking warm air from inside the case to "cool" the PSU - surely this was always counter-intuitive? Mounting the PSU at the bottom, with the fan above a case inlet, draws cool air from outside (below) the case and vents the warm air out of the back. This has to be a more efficient way of doing it. Most modern cases provide at least 1cm of space below the bottom vents which should provide more than enough airflow into the PSU.

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But for years mounting the PSU at the top of the case (with the fan facing downwards) was taking warm air from inside the case to "cool" the PSU - surely this was always counter-intuitive? Mounting the PSU at the bottom, with the fan above a case inlet, draws cool air from outside (below) the case and vents the warm air out of the back. This has to be a more efficient way of doing it. Most modern cases provide at least 1cm of space below the bottom vents which should provide more than enough airflow into the PSU.

 

 

But for years mounting the PSU at the top of the case (with the fan facing downwards) was taking warm air from inside the case to "cool" the PSU - surely this was always counter-intuitive?

 

Not really. It was done for decades and never caused any issues whatsoever. I think what you may be doing is overestimating the temperature of the air  that's drawn into the PSU. If I measure it with my infra-red thermometer it's not excessive.

 

For example, the very PC I am using now, mostly for browsing the internet, is an old Chieftec Dragon with the PSU at the top, drawing air from inside the case. It has an 850 watt Corsair PSU installed. As I'm sure you know, the PSU fan is temperature controlled, and guess what... the fan barely ticks over. Even under load it doesn't spin very fast. It doesn't need to because the air drawn into the PSU isn't excessively warm.

 

Same applies to my Ivy Bridge PC. It's an old Lian Li case, with the same very restrictive vents as my new X510. Therefore I mounted the PSU with the fan up, drawing in air from inside the case. In this case it has a 1000 watt Enermax PSU. And guess what... same applies, the temperature controlled fan barely ticks over.

 

Same applies to CPU air coolers, in that they also cool the CPU with air from inside the case. No issue, they cool great. Same applies to AIO coolers, some mount the rad  and fans in such as way the air from inside the case passes through the rad and then outside. They do this so as not to draw warm radiator air into the case. Works great, barely warmer than the opposite scenario.

 

Mounting the PSU at the bottom, with the fan above a case inlet, draws cool air from outside (below) the case 

 

In theory yes, but as I said, if the vents are restrictive and you also, by necessity, add a filter which also restricts the air that can pass through, you are effectively starving the PSU of air. It varies from manufacturer to manufacturer of course, but as I said, the Lian Li PSU vents are very, very restrictive. So restrictive that they are akin to an almost closed Venetian blind. The air that can pass through is minimal.

 

Most modern cases provide at least 1cm of space below the bottom vents which should provide more than enough airflow into the PSU.

 

Precisely! As I've already mentioned in my previous post. Now ask yourself a question. Where dose the air that passes through that "1cm gap" come from? That's right, it's drawn in from the inside of the case. And given that, in the case of my Lian Li, the vents at the bottom of the case are so restrictive that they can barely draw any air through, the majority of the air is being drawn in from inside the case... so what's the point? The PSU may as well be inverted. 

 

As I mentioned, it varies greatly from manufacturer to manufacturer, with the Lian Li vent design being particularly restrictive. I recall some Corsiar cases aren't as bad in this respect. But despite that, there's no need at all in my opinion for a PSU to "attempt" to draw air through any kind of vent and filter system. All of them will be restrictive to some degree... precisely why the manufacturers are "forced" to raise the PSU off the case floor in order to compensate for the restrictive vents. In other words, as a design, it's a compromise!

 

I recall someone on this very forum, a couple of years ago, built a system and encountered the same problem. He mounted the PSU fan down, and noticed the the PSU fan RPM was excessive. So he inverted the PSU so it ingested air from inside the case and problem solved, the fan just ticked over.

 

Edit: The other point of course is that with PSU fan pointing down, you have to worry about the surface the PC is on. Carpet is a big no, no as it's blocks the vents. Fan up no issue on carpet.

 

It's exceedingly rare for a PSU to catch fire of course, but it has happened, when it does, vents at the bottom of the case and a PSU orientated down aren't ideal.

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The 1080 may be available by the end of the month but only the reference design from nVidia. Volume cards from good names like evga might take awhile longer.

 

 

I read the first tests today as the "embargo" by Nvidia was withdrawn by Nvidia today.

They say indeed that the "Reference Design" aka "Founders Edition" lacks a good cooling and is quite noisy.

They also wrote that cooling is responsible that the frequency of the GPU is tuned down in some games.

 

So I will wait for the EVGA or ASUS OC version of the 1080.

 

Edit: Here are some Benchmarks of the 1080. They are in German, but the charts speak for themselves.

http://www.computerbase.de/2016-05/geforce-gtx-1080-test/7/

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$2000 isn't a lot.It's pretty standard for a reasonable PC.

 

That depends on whether you keep your existing peripherals (monitor/mouse/keyboard/speakers etc), and also if you need a top end graphics card. My last PC cost me around £900 (case and all components), and it is more than powerful enough for a single monitor user like me.

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Well yes, I was referring to a complete build, high end, with graphics card. Obviously costs can be cut dramatically if you're using components you already have and settle for a less capable graphics card.

 

In my case it 's a complete build, monitor, keyboard, mouse, the lot. Has to be because my son is having my Ivy Bridge rig. 

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Most modern cases provide at least 1cm of space below the bottom vents which should provide more than enough airflow into the PSU.

 

Precisely! As I've already mentioned in my previous post. Now ask yourself a question. Where dose the air that passes through that "1cm gap" come from? That's right, it's drawn in from the inside of the case. And given that, in the case of my Lian Li, the vents at the bottom of the case are so restrictive that they can barely draw any air through, the majority of the air is being drawn in from inside the case... so what's the point? The PSU may as well be inverted.

 

I think you misunderstand my comment. The 1cm gap I refer to is the gap UNDER the case so air going into the PSU is coming from outside the case, not from the inside. The bottom (PSU) vent in my Phanteks case, including the filter, provides very little resistance to airflow and if it comes down to a choice of either cool air from outside of the case or warm air from inside, I know what I'll opt for to cool the PSU. Each to his/her own, of course.

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I think you misunderstand my comment. The 1cm gap I refer to is the gap UNDER the case so air going into the PSU is coming from outside the case, not from the inside.

 

 

 

Oh right.

 

Obviously though, that gap isn't relevant if your vents are very restrictive... as mine are! As many manufactures vents are!  The gap I was referring to was beneath the PSU and above the enclosure floor. You must have one, all enclosures do! Now consider how much air passes through that gap from inside your case? You decide how much, it's enclosure specific.

 

 

The bottom (PSU) vent in my Phanteks case, including the filter, provides very little resistance to airflow 

 

 

 

"Very little resistance to airflow" you say...  I've looked at the Phanteks vents, they appear to be "fairly" open slots. Great stuff! Pity Lian Li don't do the same! Pity all case manufactures don't do the same!

 

Do understand though, that even fairly open slots are restrictive to some degree, they have to be unless we decide to ignore the laws of physics. 

 

 

if it comes down to a choice of either cool air from outside of the case or warm air from inside, I know what I'll opt for to cool the PSU.

 

 

 

Again you are overestimating the temperature of the air that's ingested into the PSU! Trust me, I've measured it with my infra-red thermometer, it's not excessive at all! It's not an issue! It hasn't been an issue for the decades this design has been implemented, it's not suddenly an issue now. Don't forget, we have bloody big fans blowing cool air in straight toward the PSU from the front of the enclosure. In my case 3 120 fans.

 

If you'd like definitive evidence, consider this... PSU fans are temperature controlled. My PSU fan barely ticks over. This is definitive evidence that ingesting air from inside the enclosure isn't an issue! If it were an issue, what do you think would happen? That's right, the PSU fan RPM would ramp up, it isn't!

 

All enclosure vent and filter system's MUST restrict air to some degree, your PSU temperature will increase accordingly, when it does, your PSU fan will increase it's RPM to compensate.

 

I put it to you that MY PSU fan RPM is no different to your PSU fan RPM. Once we take into consideration varying PSU specs of course. And thus... the somewhat warmer air my PSU ingests is no different to the temperature increase your PSU experiences as a result of having to suck air through vents and filters..

 

You seem to be lucky though, in that you have a fairly open vent design. Many aren't!

 

 

 

Each to his/her own, of course.

 

 

 

 

Well no, not really, it's not each to his own. It's not a random decision. I didn't take a drill to my very expensive enclosure just for fun. Again, the vents were VERY restrictive. If you peruse the Lian Li site and look at the vent design you will see what I mean.

 

The mistake you are making is making a judgement based on a sample size of ONE!. Namely your enclosure. Consider all enclosures, all manufactures, all designs.

 

To sum up, my point is that given that ingesting air from inside the enclose isn't an issue, as evidenced by PSU fan rpm reaming very low.... then there is no point at all in designing enclosures with bottom PSU vents.

 

However... there are many disadvantages...

 

Sparks and flames from a failing PSU igniting flammable material beneath.

 

Often the vents at the bottom of the enclosure don't align with the PSU fan. [My Lian Li vents don't] As PSU design varies.

 

All vent systems must restrict air to varying degrees.

 

Additional air filters are known to restrict airflow.

 

Manufactures are forced to compensate for restrictive vents and filters by raising the PSU off the enclosure floor, negating the purpose of bottom vents. 

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Ok I'm closing on my final choices.

 

I'll go with the noctua for the cooling it looks very good an easy to install :)

 

As for the mother board, I'll probably go for a Gigabyte Z170-UDH3P, it is close in price with the Asus Z170-A, the main issue I have with that one, is that I'm not really sure the airflow would be very good with the only PCI slot just below the place where the dual slot graphic card will be, which would make litle space for air to get through the GPU ventirad. 

On this one the PCI slot ae at the bottom so it will be better I believe. Also my current build is based on a Z77x-UD5H which I've had no issue after four years so I'll be on the same kind of price and durability I believe.

 

As for the case I'll probably go for a Fractal Design R5 which looks pretty good, the form is simple, but I like also that the door could be removed, as on previous tower I had issue with my front bay for my x-fi which prevented closing the door.

 

I've not yet decided on the powersupply, smi modular looks good indeed, so far I'll need for what I plannedwith 4 SATA peripherals, the GPU 8 pins power cable, and the noctua should be supply through the usual motherboard pins.

 

I'll be waiting a bit more for choices other thant the founders edition to be availble, I'd probably go on an EVGA card too based on the 1080.

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I'm not really sure the airflow would be very good with the only PCI slot just below the place where the dual slot graphic card will be, which would make litle space for air to get through the GPU ventirad. 

 

 

 

What are you planning to install in that PCI slot? There's another one lower down the board.

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What are you planning to install in that PCI slot? There's another one lower down the board.

 

On the Asus Z170-A there is only one PCI slot right below where the GFX card will be as far as I can tell for the specs, there is not another port. On the gigabyte there are two indeeds though I only need one, but there location seems better as there are PCI-E slots that will be free.

 

I'll be installing my good old Creative X-Fi Plat1num. I wish I could change for a new card on PCI-E slot, unfortunately all their newer models have no Dolby/dts decoding anymore, encoding seems to always be there. I asked them if they had any products that could replace it, but the only suggestion was an external USB audio card, which I'm not really sure is as good. Unfortunately, it is not a low profile card, so it can be used with some cards that could convert PCI to PCI-E.

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Asus on-board Crystal Sound 3 is very good you know. Not like on-board sound of old.

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Asus on-board Crystal Sound 3 is very good you know. Not like on-board sound of old.

 

It might be good but I would lose DTS/Dolby decoding, that's why I'm keeping this card, also the front panel that goes into a bay, is very handy I can plug and manage headset there directly, not fidling behind the case, as well as controlling volume through knobs. All of this is pretty usefull. All of this linked to an as old but still doing as good 5.1 THX Logitech kit. Basically my computer also serves to play movies, or linked to consoles in this case the 5.1 sound comes through my soundcard, the DTS/Dolby can be decoded, and outputed to my 5.1 sound system.

 

Without it, well it would mean no more decoding for the Blu-Ray playing from the computer, and going back to stereao sound for consoles instead of 5.1. For all thes reasons I'm continuing this way. Also the sound card is still supported and has official Windows 10 drivers even though it is pretty old :)

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