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amit24075844

PMDG 737 not stable on touchdown

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Hello,

I have a problem, every time I land with the 737 family aircraft n touchdown the aircraft is not stable and I am leveled on touchdown and I dont know how to fix it.

You can see it on one of my videos.

https://www.twitch.tv/amit240/v/75208532  at 05:10:00 (Time in the video)

thanks for the helpers.

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What hardware controls are you using? Looks possibly like differential breaking is your issue, so if you using toe pedals you might want to use FSPUIC to change the curve and sensitivity of them.

 

Equally there was a cross wind with the landing, and unfortunately FSX (maybe P3D) doesn't do ground effect very well - so cross winds on the ground have a somewhat unrealistic effect on the aircraft at speed - however some nose down and opposite Aileron should help with the control.

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You'll get better rudder travel and steering at touchdown if the yaw damper is off.

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Yaw damper always stays on except for a few non-normal procedures.  Not as realistic, but I have autorudder set on.  In the real aircraft, we rarely touch the rudders in flight.  Rudders are used during takeoff roll, landing roll out, and extensively during engine out conditions.

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Yaw damper always stays on except for a few non-normal procedures.  Not as realistic, but I have autorudder set on.  In the real aircraft, we rarely touch the rudders in flight.  Rudders are used during takeoff roll, landing roll out, and extensively during engine out conditions.

Full names in the forum please.

 

Looks like a hardware issue to me.

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In case you also use Accu-Feel, the "Side forces" setting is horribly exaggerated at the default setting, and leads to all aircraft landing on only one of the main gear, unless the setting is reduced.

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Yaw damper always stays on except for a few non-normal procedures.  Not as realistic, but I have autorudder set on.  In the real aircraft, we rarely touch the rudders in flight.  Rudders are used during takeoff roll, landing roll out, and extensively during engine out conditions.

 

I dont mean to steal this thread for another topic but i always wandered how are crab approaches done? isn't the rudder used extensively in that situation?

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I dont mean to steal this thread for another topic but i always wandered how are crab approaches done? isn't the rudder used extensively in that situation?

 

For a small plane? Yes, but that's a slipped approach (often incorrectly referred to a crabbed approach).

 

For an airliner? No. Fly the approach crabbed (not slipped, like a small plane). Just before touching down, you turn the plane about the yaw axis to align it with the runway by using just enough rudder to do so.

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Fly the approach crabbed (not slipped, like a small plane). Just before touching down, you turn the plane about the yaw axis to align it with the runway by using just enough rudder to do so.

But that's exactly what i am referring to, don't you make use of the rudder to do both things you mention? rudder for maintaining a crabbed (not slipped) approach and again rudder for final alignment....?

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don't you make use of the rudder to do both things you mention?

 

Yes.

 

 

 


rudder for maintaining a crabbed (not slipped) approach and again rudder for final alignment....?

 

No.

 

For a crabbed approach, you simply turn the aircraft into the wind as if you were turning the aircraft to any heading. Then you use the rudder right at the end to align yourself just above the runway.

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The crab doesn't really use rudder until alignment at touchdown. You are turning into the wind and letting the plane fly the way it naturally wants to in order to stay aligned. Thus the crab.

 

In smaller planes we are typically taught to dip a wing and then apply opposite rudder to align the plane on short final. That makes heavy use of rudder and helps not to side load so badly on touchdown.

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