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Captain Kevin

Quite The Shaking

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13 hours ago, Milton Waddams said:

Now you have a taste of what it must be like to be a storm chaser!

Interestingly enough, if you watch videos taken from within the WC-130s penetrating a storm you don't see the violent shaking that hollywood and flightsimulators like to provide, except penetrating bands and eyewalls or within a convective cell.  Turbulence seems to be much understood.

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19 minutes ago, downscc said:

Interestingly enough, if you watch videos taken from within the WC-130s penetrating a storm you don't see the violent shaking that hollywood and flightsimulators like to provide, except penetrating bands and eyewalls or within a convective cell.  Turbulence seems to be much understood.

Interesting.

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2 hours ago, downscc said:

Interestingly enough, if you watch videos taken from within the WC-130s penetrating a storm you don't see the violent shaking that hollywood and flightsimulators like to provide, except penetrating bands and eyewalls or within a convective cell.  Turbulence seems to be much understood.

Agree that flightsims exaggerate turbulence (I usually reduce the ASN turbulence scalar from default 70 to 30 to get something more realistic).  But a lot of the hurricane hunter videos you see are taken inside the eyewall, where conditions are calm.  On the way in and out, things can get bumpy, to put it mildly.  Here are just a couple of videos of teeth getting rattled...
 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Alan_A said:

On the way in and out, things can get bumpy, to put it mildly.

Agree, which is what I meant by penetrating eyewall, bands and cells.  The NOAA P-3s are a tough bird but I'm partial to the AF C-130s.  I've been stationed at Keesler AFB with them and will always admire their work.

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1 hour ago, downscc said:

which is what I meant by penetrating eyewall, bands and cells.

Indeed you did - and I managed to read right past that.  (Reading) speed kills!  Apologies.

I can imagine that the C-130s would ride particularly well - though I saw a comment recently about how tough Lockheed airframes are, pointing to both the P-3 and C-130 hurricane hunters as examples.  Think there's anything to that?

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52 minutes ago, Alan_A said:

Indeed you did - and I managed to read right past that.  (Reading) speed kills!  Apologies.

I can imagine that the C-130s would ride particularly well - though I saw a comment recently about how tough Lockheed airframes are, pointing to both the P-3 and C-130 hurricane hunters as examples.  Think there's anything to that?

I sure do.  A good example of how tough the Orion is in the book by the pilot that got rammed by a Chinese fighter and managed to land the thing, the title is "Born to Fly" I believe.  The Herc's are legendary in their ability to haul in and out of the toughest places in the world.  Lockheed takes a lot of pride in these ships as they should.

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2 hours ago, downscc said:

A good example of how tough the Orion is.........got rammed by a Chinese fighter and managed to land.....

Indeed.

 

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I will have to try that this weekend. So wierd to look at S. Florida and see almost empty skies on FlightAware!

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I just listened to the 53rd WRS information officer relating what he had heard from pilots that have ventured into Irma.  He said that category 5 storms are normally smooth flying but Irma has been very turbulent, perhaps owing to the fact that it has had land contact with Cuba. He had earlier said that every storm is different, each with its own personality.  Sounds like Irma is like an elephant with a bad attitude, she is going to knock down something.

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23 hours ago, downscc said:

Agree, which is what I meant by penetrating eyewall, bands and cells.  The NOAA P-3s are a tough bird but I'm partial to the AF C-130s.  I've been stationed at Keesler AFB with them and will always admire their work.

I was at Keesler from September of 73 to June of 74 attending tech school. There were still areas in and around Biloxi that showed evidence of damage from Hurricane Camille, 4 years after the event.

The 53rd WRS was active even then. At the time, there was a walking path from the Triangle student housing complex to the back gate that went right past the south threshold of the main runway. I used to like watching the Hurricane Hunter C-130s taking off and landing from that vantage point.

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Saw the WRS birds and the occasional NOAA P-3's at Keesler 98-01 timeframe.  Mostly Herc trainers though.  I remember when most of them did a storm evac to get out of the way of hurricane Georges.

 

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