martin-w

Intel’s first “s-series” Core i9 CPU will be soldered

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The Coffee Lake Refresh will launch in October. At launch, only three SKUs will be available: Core i9-9900K, Core i7-9700K, and Core i5-9600K (with Core i5-9400 coming in Q1 2019).

The documents that were shared with us anonymously, confirm that new processors will be soldered. It is unconfirmed whether Core i5-9600K is also using STIM (Solder Thermal Interface Material) because the files we have only refer to 8-core parts.

 

 

https://videocardz.com/77356/intel-core-i9-9900k-confirmed-to-be-soldered

 

Intel-Core-9000-Main-Features-1000x563.jpg

 

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Well... lets hope the above is true chaps. 😉

 

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I hope its true.  As much as I enjoy getting the most out of my CPUs (via de-lidding) not having to take the risk of damaging the chip, losing the warranty, or buying liquid metal are all benefits in my book.

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Pardon my ignorance... it's been a long time, since I've messed around with hardware and computer building... but what does it mean, that the CPU will be soldered? Soldered to what? (hopefully not the mainboard)... 

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3 minutes ago, ABermann said:

Pardon my ignorance... it's been a long time, since I've messed around with hardware and computer building... but what does it mean, that the CPU will be soldered? Soldered to what? (hopefully not the mainboard)... 

+1

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, ABermann said:

Pardon my ignorance... it's been a long time, since I've messed around with hardware and computer building... but what does it mean, that the CPU will be soldered? Soldered to what? (hopefully not the mainboard)... 

The integrated heat spreader (IHS - that you attach your CPU cooler to) will be soldered on top of the CPU chip rather than just having thermal paste to conduct the heat away.

Edited by vortex681

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30 minutes ago, vortex681 said:

The integrated heat spreader (IHS - that you attach your CPU cooler to) will be soldered on top of the CPU chip rather than just having thermal paste to conduct the heat away.

Ah... undrrstood! Excellent. No more delidding required and everybody will enjoy excellent and more consistent cooling performance. 

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Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, odourboy said:

Ah... undrrstood! Excellent. No more delidding required and everybody will enjoy excellent and more consistent cooling performance. 

 

Actually, I'm wondering what the difference is between liquid metal TIM, for example Conductonaut and solder. How close they are in terms of thermal efficiency.  In other words how much cooler will solder be than liquid metal be, if at all. 

 

Edit... seems Conductonaut liquid metal is 75 w/mk. Indium solder is 81.8 w/mk.

Edited by martin-w

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Intel's soldering method does not use pure indium.  Der8auer has a video on it 

 

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4 hours ago, vortex681 said:

The integrated heat spreader (IHS - that you attach your CPU cooler to) will be soldered on top of the CPU chip rather than just having thermal paste to conduct the heat away.

Interesting.

So - in laymans terms, Intel starts glueing (soldering) the heatsink on top of the CPU? 
(I'm trying to wrap my head around it...)

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27 minutes ago, ABermann said:

Interesting.

So - in laymans terms, Intel starts glueing (soldering) the heatsink on top of the CPU? 
(I'm trying to wrap my head around it...)

I think it's important to note here that this is not a new idea.

Intel used to do this for nearly every CPU they manufactured.  They stopped doing it with the Ivy Bridge generation of consumer desktop CPUs (2012 - Core i7/5/3 3xxx series).  This had a negative affect on cooling performance, which lead to a reduction in overclocking potential.  This caused savvy power-users, enthusiasts, and hardcore overclockers to develop a process to alleviate this new cooling issue, dubbed "de-lidding".  

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Hopefully this will also cut down attempted returns of damaged and kentucky fried CPU's from failed delids.

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30 minutes ago, TechguyMaxC said:

I think it's important to note here that this is not a new idea.

Intel used to do this for nearly every CPU they manufactured.  They stopped doing it with the Ivy Bridge generation of consumer desktop CPUs (2012 - Core i7/5/3 3xxx series).  This had a negative affect on cooling performance, which lead to a reduction in overclocking potential.  This caused savvy power-users, enthusiasts, and hardcore overclockers to develop a process to alleviate this new cooling issue, dubbed "de-lidding".  

Really? Maybe I'm misunderstanding you, but I have assembled dusins of computers and hardware throughout the 00's (2001-2010) - both professionally and as a hobby, and I have to this day, never seen a CPU, where the heatsink were soldered on top of the CPU... Typically the heatsink (with fan) had to be fastened using a special clip or screwed onto the motherboard using special brackets, which were fitted on the motherboard.

My experience stretches to consumer products, though... I haven't been messing around with enterprise products. But then again, I could be misunderstanding what you meant/say. 

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, ABermann said:

Really? Maybe I'm misunderstanding you, but I have assembled dusins of computers and hardware throughout the 00's (2001-2010) - both professionally and as a hobby, and I have to this day, never seen a CPU, where the heatsink were soldered on top of the CPU... Typically the heatsink (with fan) had to be fastened using a special clip or screwed onto the motherboard using special brackets, which were fitted on the motherboard.

My experience stretches to consumer products, though... I haven't been messing around with enterprise products. But then again, I could be misunderstanding what you meant/say. 

Yes, you are misunderstanding 😉

 

What you call "the CPU" is in fact the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) (flat metal "lid") which sits on top of a CPU die, which is itself attached to a PCB.  The soldering we refer to in this case is between the CPU die and the IHS.  No one is saying the heatsink is soldered to the IHS.  

Edited by TechguyMaxC
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9 minutes ago, TechguyMaxC said:

Yes, you are misunderstanding 😉

 

What you call "the CPU" is in fact the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) (flat metal "lid") which sits on top of a CPU die, which is itself attached to a PCB.  The soldering we refer to in this case is between the CPU die and the IHS.  No one is saying the heatsink is soldered to the IHS.  

Wow! I can see that this is going to cause some misunderstanding for newer folks and one who have been away for a while. To be clear...Do not get out your solder gun. We the consumers do not need to solder anything!

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