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Capt. Randazzo : - real world airplane.

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I read that Capt. Randazzo is a real world captain and just was kinda interested to know what airplane he fly every day, and are they always in the US or international flights? any other airplanes as well as the Jetstream 41 turboprop? i have the 737-800 model on cd and really like it and hope to get the 747 as well.Darren:-)

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ah well perhaps the captain didn't see the thread or he is busy flying in the real world, maybe another time, always nice to hear from a real world driver.:(

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Fair question. It is my understanding that Robert moved to Reno, Nevada (one of my favorite spots, spent a night in one of their hospitals recently after a skiing injury). I also wonder how much this change of address impacted his flying careeer. What airline he flies for, what aircraft? I am having hard time finding out if there are any commuter airlines flying out of Reno that utilize turboprop aircraft - something similar to the Jetstream 41 RR used to fly. Or perhaps he upgraded to jets? Michael J.http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/for...argo_hauler.gifhttp://sales.hifisim.com/pub-download/asv6-banner-beta.jpg

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oh right, hope it is okay to bump this one up just one more time, may be it will be seen this weekend, i'm really interested to know what airplanes RSR is 'type-rated' on as i am sure i read on here it was 5.is one a 737?Cheers,Darren

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Well ... the uniform he's pictured wearing does look suspiciously like the one worn by United Airlines flight officers :)

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HAHAHAHAHAHAIf it looks suspicously like- that would be because it isn't. ;-)I spent a number of years at UAL in management before leaving to take a flying position at Atlantic Coast Airlines, the UAX feeder in Washington, DC. As some of you might know- ACA divorced itself from the UAX program 2 years ago, and subsequently proved how hard it is to make money without a good business plan in the airline business. All of us were laid off and the airline shut down in early January.I've been in the airline business for 18 years- and most of that time has been spent travelling- so I'm currently taking my time before returning to flying full time. I'm looking to find a position at a company like Evergreen/Atlas/One of the many international carriers that operate the -400 with US crews. It's rather nice sleeping in one's own bed at night- and since Marisa and I are expecting a baby in September- I might just wait until next year before looking too hard for work. :-)I'm typed in both the JetStream 31/32 and the Jetsream 41, as well as the 757 and 767. I'm currently trying to find time in my calendar to go to Alteon for a 747-400 type rating. I figure I've spent enough time in the sim and I know enough about the airplane that completing the type course shouldn't be too hard, right? ;-) In the mean time, nearly all of my energy is focused on PMDG... So that means good things for all of us- and my flying is split between a 1945 SNJ6 and a Twin Commander....I was supposed to pick Lefteris up in the TC last summer- but suffered an uncontained engine failure with the airplane that morning- made for an exciting time. Later that week I was going to take him flying over the desert- and had a hydraulic lock on the bottom cylinder on the PW1360 that powers the SNJ, so we couldn't even get it started.... (Consider that a sign from heaven? who knows...LOL)Next time he comes back here I have to make it up to him now. :-)If any PMDG fans are going to be near Truckee, California on May9/10 I may take the SNJ there for the EAA "Aluminum Overcast" visit that is scheduled.... No promises- but I just might. :-)

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>and since Marisa and I are expecting a baby in September- Congrats on the upcoming baby!!>If any PMDG fans are going to be near Truckee, California on>May9/10 I may take the SNJ there for the EAA "Aluminum>Overcast" visit that is scheduled.... No promises- but I just>might. :-)Rob, I just might be in Truckee on those days. I was supposed to be there anyway and May 9/10 sounds as good to me as any other day. Could you please keep me posted on your plans. I am not sure what the EAA "Aluminum Overcast" is but I would be thrilled meeting you in person and perhaps touch some "aluminum" too. I love Truckee airport.Michael J.

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MJ-Okay- you have a deal. I'll keep you posted. (It's looking pretty good that i'll be there... I mean.... it involves airplanes, after all!)Aluminum Overcast is EAA's restored B-17 (i think she's a G model) aboard which they they offer familiarization rides. Great old airplane....Truckee airport is great- during the winter. During summer that density altitude really makes you pay attention, especially given that there is rising terrain on 3 sides.....Most likely I'll be there... but as I said- I'll let you know for certain!

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>Okay- you have a deal. Fantastic!>Aluminum Overcast is EAA's restored B-17 Yes, and I just verified this airplane will be in "my" place - Moffett Federal Airport on April 28-30 as part of its tour. I work just 100 yards beyond the runway's fence.Michael J.

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That sounds like a load of fun. Now Robert, don't take this as I think you're old or anything but my grandfather flew SNJ's during the war. Got shot down twice in the pacific. I'm pretty sure you're not anywhere close to how old he would have been...lol.Take some pics for me. Good luck with the old bird.P.S. An uncontained engine failure??? What the heck happened?

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Jeff-Well, the short version is that the engine builder had used a sylicone sealant within the engine when it was built in 2004. The use of sylicon in within an engine is a no-no, as eventually it emulsifies and shows up in the oil system.I had flown the airplane down to Long Beach to spend some research time in the MD11 sim with Bill Grabowski, and on the flight down I noticed a minor temperature variance between the two engines. A routine check turned up nothing (engines often run slightly different temps- but this airplane and I don't really know each other well yet- so I had it looked at...) On the return leg, right before top-of-descent I noticed a loss of power on the right engine, so we turned her over to maintenance for a closer inspection.The mechs did what mechs do (comprised mostly of standing around drinking coffee- eating sugared snacks and poking fun of us pilots..) and when it came time to test fly the airplane again- I was the obvious choice since I knew what i was looking for. I had no problems with the airplane during the test flight, and decided to spend some loiter time up at 17,500 enjoying the beautiful view of Lake Tahoe, since Lefteris wasn't due in for another 3hrs and I had some time to kill. (Besides- nobody would question why I stayed up and played since they thought I was test flying, right? hahahaha)About 10 minutes before I was going to start down- I was jotting down another set of performance numbers for the data log- when i noticed a very slight change in oil temp on the right side. I watched it- and in the span of less time than it takes to read this sentence- the temp started moving more rapidly and the right engine lost power.At first I thought it was just a partial power loss, but after running the QRH for power loss on the right engine- it was pretty obvious that the engine had quite outright. I considered a relight- but since I didn't really know the nature of the failure I elected to leave well enough alone- and commenced with the Engine Failure QRH.Problem was, the prop wouldn't feather. :-)So I continued to loiter- and called my mech on the ground below and filled him in with my predicament. They way you can tell a good mech from a great mech- is that a good mech sounds surprised when you tell him that his engine failed. A GREAT mech takes it personally, asks you to double check (Because you are just a dumb pilot) then takes it as a personal insult that the machinery has let his reputation down. Poor guy- I actually felt bad!I took a bit more time to run the engine failure checklist, and was eventually able to get the prop feathered- and shot a standard VFR approach to a Flaps 20 landing. (Other guys in the pattern were very cool about the fact that I wanted to change the landing runway on the fly....)When we opened up the cowling, I think we were all pretty astounded by the level of damage. The engine was recognizable primarily because of the wires and tubing- but the core itself was a complete disaster and the cowling was full of metal and oil (most of it from when i feathered the prop and it dumped inside the shattered engine....)In the end- the overhaul facility found that the entire oil distribution system had become clogged with globs and strings of sylicone sealant. You can imagine my frustration.In the end all went precisely as it should gone because I've had some very fine training pilots in my career- and they- plus the crewmembers I've flown with and the crews who worked for me as a Chief Pilot have all contributed small pieces to my general fund of knowledge.When you find yourself in a sick airplane the outcome should never be in doubt. You gotta take your time, examine your plan, make adjustments and take your time.Gotta love aviation!

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Hmm, sounds like an interesting experiance Robert!The most I have had to deal with is a total electrical failure half way between Main Land Australia and Kangaroo Island.

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>I'm looking to>find a position at a company like Evergreen/Atlas/One of the>many international carriers that operate the -400 with US>crews. It's rather nice sleeping in one's own bed at night->and since Marisa and I are expecting a baby in September- I>might just wait until next year before looking too hard for>work. :-)Congrats to you both Robert! If you guys are ever in Ireland, the drinks are on me :) About that 747-400 type rating, would an airline like Atlas pay to send you on that course with the idea to transfer you to the -400 fleet or would you have to complete the course yourself and then apply?

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Hi Captain, congrats to you and Marisa.Regards.Miquel Egea.

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Paul,My experience has been that airlines have moved away from sponsored training in general, some will reimburse you if you qualify and they want to take you on but for the most part you pay the full cost yourself up front in the hope of being taken on.Type ratings can cost up to

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Robert,Congrats on the Baby. I hope you hate sleep :-)Bummer about IDE. We really loved working with you guys!Scott

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Holy smokes, ouch! I'm glad you had the altitude, that's for sure. That's a lesson in itself.Certainly sorry to hear about the engine. What an expensive lesson to learn.The main thing is you made it back ok.

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Scott-Thanks. ACA was a fun company for whom to work. Unfortunately it suffered from "small corporate growth syndrome." There was a small core of employees were with the airline when it was being run out of the back of a car in a parking lot someplace (not really- but you know what i mean...) and since the core group of original employees was so small- they were all very familiar to each other.As the company grew and prospered this core group began promoting itself into positions that had nice titles. Late in ACA's history, a few of us were invited into this inner sanctum- but it was quickly obvious that the "inner core" was more interested the protection of their fifedoms than they were in expansion of capabilities and new thinking in the ranks.While under the umbrella of UAL, there was no real danger- but once ACA stepped out as Independence Air- what they really needed were experienced managers who knew how to run an airline as a carnivorous machine rather than a happy social club.In the end, most of us who had experience at other airlines could see the writing on the wall. They deployed A320s into saturated florida markets in the middle of winter. (Rule of thumb: You can't make money going to florida in winter...) Then, rather than build up a strong market presence in key markets over time, they ran 1-3 flights a day in 5 transcon markets at odd times of day. (Rule of thumb: You have to have a strong market presence at the time of day customers want to travel...)In the end- the "key decision makers" had to face the economic reality of the fact that they needed more experience than they alone could provide.It was a sad demise for a great workplace. I had more fun working for ACA than I could possibly recount. I made some great life-long friends, and I had the honor of associating with some of the finest professionals I've ever met.Unfortunately- it's a winner take all business- and you need to promote people based upon capability rather than longevity....Sad, sad, sad.(Wow- this thread is almost cathartic isn't it? HAHAHAH)

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For those who are interested. I think it is boiling down to this in the regional airline world. Republic Airways is becoming the most sought after regional airline in the states. They currently fly for UAL and Delta, the recent skuttlebutt (sp.) that NWA is also looking into Republic. These major carriers love Republic because of the new Emb-170's. Their fuel consumption is better than anything else out there in that particular class, not to mention the E-Jets range and passenger comfortability. You see right now Republic/Shuttle America is the only airline in the US that is buying these new jets from Embraer almost entirely with cash in hand. Why are they able to do this? Because they are owned by Wexford Aviation (a subsidiary of Wexford Holding, LLC) out of FLA. Wexford is a huge, multi-billion dollar hedge fund operator, and they own alot of other assests as well. I believe they own a big chunk of Frontier as well. Chautauqua Airines is also a subsidiary of Republic Airways Holdings as well. The fact is Republic is slowly taking jobs aways from 737 and some 757 drivers that work at UAL.My good friend who is a captain with Republic (technically Shuttle America) will pull up to the gate at ORD and look over at the 73 or 75 parked next to him and the UAL pilots will give him the finger amoung other jestures. They even deny jump seating rights to Republic and Shuttle America pilots at their own discretion. Which is against company policy and agreements set by company execs.Jet Blue is even starting to really mess up their Emb-195 program. Jetblue, can't have to much of a good thing.That's just my two cents about what is going on with this transformation age we live in. Brandon

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"In the end, most of us who had experience at other airlines could see the writing on the wall. They deployed A320s into saturated florida markets in the middle of winter."Thought IDE had A319's???Were you typed on the CRJ as well? Didnt see it listed above.Just curious. Friend of mine got laid off before they went under.I enjoyed IDE, employees really seemed to try harder than most.Thanks!GeneKMCO

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MJ-That is the $64,000 question. I'm guessing yes. UAL put the screws to ACA management badly after 2001. They had good reason to- ACA was posting massive profits for a regional at a time when UAL was bleeding white.(But that isn't ACA's fault- who thought that "Fee for Departures" was a good idea? It was a guaranteed windfall for a regional- and a guaranteed loser for the parent carrier... but UAL has never been known for it's ability to understand that the airline business is cyclical- and since they were signing that contract during a cash-fat period- they never worried about the eventual down cycle... One time I was made to fly an empty J41 to White Plains in the middle of the night- then turned around and flew it home empty... just to ensure that UAL had to pay us for the departure.... Is that sane?)I was obviously not privvy to any numbers- but given the profit margin's ACA was enjoying- I think there was plenty of wiggle room for ACA to continue making a profit during UAL's downturn. Honestly I think the move to Independence Air was well timed, well thought out and exceptionally poorly executed. The folks responsible for route planning actually thought that they could just overlay the old UAX network with a new loc cost carrier and it would all work wonderfully...What is amazing to me is that nobody in ACA management seemed to recall that after 9-11, ACA commenced operations 3 days before UAL did- and our airplanes were completely empty. In other words- people weren't flying on us just to travel between Binghamton NY and Charleston, WV. They were connecting to transcon and international and mid-con markets that Independence wouldn't serve...Yet- for some foolhardy reason, they felt that it was important to serve second and third tier air makets with as many as 10-12 CRJs a day. When the load factors came in at 50% (I had predicted 45%) they were amazed and astounded- and attributed it to "people need to get used to who we are."It was rediculous. I had the opportunity to visit with some of my compatriots from management after I had left Chief Piloting- and it was amazing to me how under-informed they were about the realities of the Washington DC centric market. Perhaps my perspective was different because I had worked in corporate sales and operations management for UAL in DC- so i knew the market- but I would have thought that IDE would have market data and consultants....Then again, that original core of employees who had tossed bags and punched tickets for ACA way back in the beginning were all sitting in cushy senior management positions- and that i know of not many of them had done much more than run a United Express operation. So perhaps there wasn't very good market data or consultants.In the end- the whole house of cards folded. The shame is that the product Independence was pushing was 10 fold better than the competition. The people really gave a ####- and wanted the company to succeed. But you just can't make money shuttling people between Albany and Charlotte unless you also have some heavy hitting high density lift as well.I feel terribly for the guys and gals that supported us pilots all those years at ACA. They worked their hearts out to keep the airline flying- and in the end they all wound up with dust.So that's my analysis- for what it is worth. ;-)Airlines: A fun environment in which to work- but a lousy way to make a living.(Anyone ever think we aren't a serious and experienced group of blokes here at PMDG? Yeah- we've been around a bit...)

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Gene-Actually- yes- A319s- but there were some 320s in the order mix. I get lazy and call them all A320s.... LOL.... No- I never flew the Barbie Jet. I enjoyed my seniority on the J41.... schedule was far more important to me than the equipment I flew- in spite of the ribbing I took from some of my buddies. heheheheh

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The Barbie Jet...ROFL. I thought I was bad for calling them baby busses or scarebusses...hehe.

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While you were managing ast UAL did UAL Captain Mike Ray of sim book 700 fame fall under your umbrella?Just curious if you knew him.

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