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Ben Cap

Realistic Taxi?

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Does it slow down in turns in real life like most FSX A/C do?One of the things I love from the Leonardo Maddog is the way it handles on the ground, idle taxi even in turns, although I have no idea if that's realistic or not, or if the 737 NG is supposed to behave like that too

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We are not going to hack dlls to "fix" it - we legally cannot do that to the sim.
Is there any way that I can do this myself? :(

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Is there any way that I can do this myself? :(
There may be, but nobody will tell you on this forum unless they want to be banned, since it would be against the forum rules to offer advice that was illegal.Al

Alan Bradbury

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Is there any way that I can do this myself? :(
I do have this "corrected" DLL (I think).

Michael J.

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Every aircraft I've flow except one will gladly taxi at idle power. Some even need a dab of brakes to keep the speed under control which isn't easy. It's tempting to ride the brakes but then you will risk them overheating. The only aircraft that needed more than idle thrust to keep going was an old 1972 C182N.Remember that especially jet engines are still producing a huge amount of thrust even at idle. Once a nice little challenger at idle maybe 100 ft. in front of me tried to flip the C172 I was getting ready to fly. A friend of mine did get flipped behind an MD-11 starting up (Thank you FDX). There was about 200ft. between the engine and the taxiway. Ah, the joy's of flying GA at a Class B field.
So u claim that you go forward without using any throttles??Also airplane in full stopped position?I think you need a little bit percente of using throttles forward and then to idle to roll out (taxi).(That's what I mean) Ofcourse you cannot taxi with (40%) throttle continuous all the way taxing. In these case, the speed will increase far above 20 knots.So you need throttles to idle.:(

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How is this "hack" on the sim.dll file any different from "hacking"/"tweaking" the fsx.cfg file to improve performance? Personally, I see no difference and therefore no reason why it should be deemed illegal.


Matthew Bellette

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How is this "hack" on the sim.dll file any different from "hacking"/"tweaking" the fsx.cfg file to improve performance? Personally, I see no difference and therefore no reason why it should be deemed illegal.
Probably, I don't know though, because the EULA forbids it?

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How is this "hack" on the sim.dll file any different from "hacking"/"tweaking" the fsx.cfg file to improve performance? Personally, I see no difference and therefore no reason why it should be deemed illegal.
+1

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So u claim that you go forward without using any throttles??Also airplane in full stopped position?I think you need a little bit percente of using throttles forward and then to idle to roll out (taxi).(That's what I mean)
Most jet airliners will roll simply with the engines idling, which is why they have parking brakes and chocks etc. Whether they will actually set off from stationary though can depend on some other factors, for example, if the aircraft has been at the stand for a long time, the tires get a temporary flat spot because the nylon bands in the tire settle under the weight of the aircraft where it is in contact with the ground (bend some nylon or plastic when it is warm or cold and you will feel the difference). Those flat spots can often be felt on an airliner when it pushes back or sets off, especially in cold weather because the flat spot tends to remain until the tires have warmed up a bit from rolling along. So a well established flat spot from a tire that has been sat for a long time could actually act a bit like a chock and prevent the aircraft from initially rolling under idle power, which is why it might require a bit of thrust to get going, but a jet that has just landed and is light on fuel with warm tires might easily get rolling from a standstill with the throttles closed.A jet engine is not producing zero thrust when it is idling, in fact the a CFM 56 engine is at about 29 percent of N1 when the throttles at idle. The 'average' airliner jet engine will push out about somewhere 800 and 1,000lbs of thrust even when the throttles are at idle (so that can mean nearly 2,000lbs of thrust on a 737 even at idle), which doesn't sound a lot when you consider how much an airliner might weigh, but it's a bit like how you can push a two ton car and get it rolling, even though you could never actually lift two tons.Al

Alan Bradbury

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+1
Because the PMDG aircraft that we buy don't modify any code/files that aren't allowed by MS. Altering one of the app's dll files would fall in that category. Altering a file & wrapping it into a product to be sold for monetary gain without the original author's written permission has all sorts of copyright implications.That being said, someone could post how they altered this file, but it's at your own risk with no support from any software vendor, PMDG, Microsoft or any other.That's my understanding. I am not a lawyer.

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Most jet airliners will roll simply with the engines idling, which is why they have parking brakes and chocks etc. Whether they will actually set off from stationary though can depend on some other factors,
Al, stop, please lets not muddle the issue with brakes, chocks, tire flat spots, etc. There is a static and dynamic coefficient of friction, it is elementary physics. To start rolling you need higher power to overcome the static coefficient which is always higher. So you pretty much always need temporary application of extra power/thrust - I need it in my Piper so do you in a Boeing.

Michael J.

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Al, stop, please lets not muddle the issue with brakes, chocks, tire flat spots, etc. There is a static and dynamic coefficient of friction, it is elementary physics. To start rolling you need higher power to overcome the static coefficient which is always higher. So you pretty much always need temporary application of extra power/thrust - I need it in my Piper so do you in a Boeing.
Gosh, I must remember to tell all those people around the world using tie downs, chocks and parking brakes that they don't ever actually need to :( Al

Alan Bradbury

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Most jet airliners will roll simply with the engines idling, which is why they have parking brakes and chocks etc. Whether they will actually set off from stationary though can depend on some other factors, for example, if the aircraft has been at the stand for a long time, the tires get a temporary flat spot because the nylon bands in the tire settle under the weight of the aircraft where it is in contact with the ground (bend some nylon or plastic when it is warm or cold and you will feel the difference). Those flat spots can often be felt on an airliner when it pushes back or sets off, especially in cold weather because the flat spot tends to remain until the tires have warmed up a bit from rolling along. So a well established flat spot from a tire that has been sat for a long time could actually act a bit like a chock and prevent the aircraft from initially rolling under idle power, which is why it might require a bit of thrust to get going, but a jet that has just landed and is light on fuel with warm tires might easily get rolling from a standstill with the throttles closed.A jet engine is not producing zero thrust when it is idling, in fact the a CFM 56 engine is at about 29 percent of N1 when the throttles at idle. The 'average' airliner jet engine will push out about somewhere 800 and 1,000lbs of thrust even when the throttles are at idle (so that can mean nearly 2,000lbs of thrust on a 737 even at idle), which doesn't sound a lot when you consider how much an airliner might weigh, but it's a bit like how you can push a two ton car and get it rolling, even though you could never actually lift two tons.Al
I appreciate the explanation. :( Lots of great info.Best Regards,

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You will need more thrust when you're taxing on a "hill".


Sagga Toure
 

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How is this "hack" on the sim.dll file any different from "hacking"/"tweaking" the fsx.cfg file to improve performance? Personally, I see no difference and therefore no reason why it should be deemed illegal.
It's reverse engineering code - that's way different than editing a cfg file with things that are in plain text that is meant to be a method of configuring the sim. Everything in the CFG file is something Microsoft coded into the sim, it's not "hacking". Two totally different things legally.

Ryan Maziarz
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