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r22s7

Line Up The Runway

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HiWhenever i create a flight plan from anywhere to anywhere, it never lines me up with the runway. It gives me an angled approach. Quite simply, WHY??? Anyone know a fix?I can post some screenies if needed Please Reply ASAP

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Unless you do something such as, take off from runway 09 and fly directly East to another airport perfectly in line with your departure airport, which also happens to have a runway 09, and there is no wind at all and no traffic in the pattern whatsoever, then it's never going to. What you need to do is either use air traffic control to line you up for approach vectors, or use an approach STAR (Standard Terminal Arrival Route) to get you lined up, or add a waypoint manually to your plan that will take you to the extended centreline of the runway, or fly a circuit visually, or use your instruments to do an automated landing of some kind, such as an ILS approach. Typically, you will be flying out to a point some 15 miles out from the extended centreline of the runway, which is where you then turn for the airport to make your approach. ATC will set that up for you if you use it. Al

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Simply put, a flight plan does not include an 'appoach segment', you need to select an approach for the runway you aew landing on. If you are using FSX default planes, press the PROC button on the GPS for options.

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I think what he is seeing is the final vector for an ILS approach, which is usually on a 30 degree angle, he probably doesn't realize or know how to setup for an ILS approach. My suggestion is for him to go to youtube and search for "FSX ILS Tutorial" There are plenty of them! I did one myself a couple of years ago for default or non-complex aircraft.

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HiWhenever i create a flight plan from anywhere to anywhere, it never lines me up with the runway. It gives me an angled approach. Quite simply, WHY??? Anyone know a fix?I can post some screenies if needed Please Reply ASAP
Quite simply because at the time you file your flight plan (or even at the time you take-off) you do not have 100% certainty of the active runway in use at your destination airport. The "missing link" is the STAR (and "transition" the entry waypoint for the STAR). Cheers, - jahman.

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Ar the risk of starting yet another internet argument, the STAR has nothing to do with his problem. A STAR is a arrival procedure, not an approach procedure. He says his FLIGHT PLAN is not lining him up, which it is not designed to do, he needs to add the approach for the runway he is landing on. Finding the active runway is simple, either listen to the ATIS or check online for a current METAR if using real world weather. If using custom weather, then you already know what the winds are and can plan your runway accordingly.

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Ar the risk of starting yet another internet argument, the STAR has nothing to do with his problem. A STAR is a arrival procedure, not an approach procedure. He says his FLIGHT PLAN is not lining him up, which it is not designed to do, he needs to add the approach for the runway he is landing on.
That is true, but since the OP seemed to be a bit puzzled and since there are a lot of ways to line up for an approach, he will doubtless be looking at tutorials, so I thought I would at least give STARs a mention and write what it was an acronym for, because many people just type STAR, assuming everyone knows what it stands for! Al

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That is true, but since the OP seemed to be a bit puzzled and since there are a lot of ways to line up for an approach, he will doubtless be looking at tutorials, so I thought I would at least give STARs a mention and write what it was an acronym for, because many people just type STAR, assuming everyone knows what it stands for! Al
Exactly! Which is why you would see my post says STAR with an underline, meaning it is a web link, so if you click on it it takes you straight to the Wikipedia page describing what a STAR is. Pretty neat, huh? Cheers,- jahman.

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Exactly! Which is why you would see my post says STAR with an underline, meaning it is a web link, so if you click on it it takes you straight to the Wikipedia page describing what a STAR is. Pretty neat, huh? Cheers,- jahman.
Why are you pointing this out to me? I was referring solely to my own post mentioning STARs Al

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Simply put, a flight plan does not include an 'appoach segment', you need to select an approach for the runway you aew landing on. If you are using FSX default planes, press the PROC button on the GPS for options.
Can you please explain this more?

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Why don't you click the youtube link that Tom posted, pictures are better than words, and would take forever to write a tutorial for you.

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Because the approach depends on what runway is being used. The weather changes, so if you are doing a 5 hour flight, it is possible the runway changes before you arrive, therefore you would get a STAR before decent.

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Whenever i create a flight plan from anywhere to anywhere, it never lines me up with the runway. It gives me an angled approach. Quite simply, WHY???
Some have already pointed out the reason, if you are flying in and out of the larger airports then STARs will help (particularly if you are flying the larger aircraft). However, if you fly the smaller stuff OR want to use much smaller destinations then you would normally join a traffic pattern around the airport. There is a tutorial within FSX in the "Private Pilot" section about "Traffic Patterns" and more information here. Hope that helps, G

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Can you please explain this more?
Ryan, you dont say what plane you are using, so I am assuming it's a single engine prop since you are new. All default planes have a built in GPS, which makes learning a bit easier. If you havent done so already, go to the Learning Center in FSX and dig through the various sections, most of your questions will be answerd there. If you still have confusion, post here again. The 'short answer' is, a flight plan simply gives you a route from point A to point B, it does not take into account any runways. There are only 2 types of approaches, visual and instrument, and instrument have various types, the easiest is the ILS approach, if available. By opening the GPS, you will have a moving map which helps you with situational awareness so you can see your location relative to the airport. It also has many other functions, but the one you need to look at is selecting an approach by pressing the PROC button, then looking at the different options available for that airport. Once you know the runway you want to land on, (depending on wind direction), select your approach for that runway, then LOAD it. Once you are 15-20 miles from the airport, on an intercept heading for the runway (usually no more than 45 degrees), then ACTIVATE the approach. For an ILS be sure you have the correct freq and course in the #1 Nav radio and active, and set the NAV/GPS switch to NAV. Try to intercept the LOCALIZER first, at an altitude that is below the GLIDESLOPE, around 2000ft AGL(above ground level). Thats the basics, let me know what specific plane you are using and I can possibley assist a bit more, but check the Learning Center first. Again, STARS/SIDS have nothing to do with any of this at this point, you first need to learn how to insert an approach into your flight plan. SIDS/STARS are primarily for turbine aircraft and dependent on direction of flight and only major airports use them.

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Thats the basics, let me know what specific plane you are using and I can possibley assist a bit more, but check the Learning Center first. Again, STARS/SIDS have nothing to do with any of this at this point, you first need to learn how to insert an approach into your flight plan. SIDS/STARS are primarily for turbine aircraft and dependent on direction of flight and only major airports use them.
I am using default 737

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Thats kinda like trying to run before you can stand :-) You should start with the 172, choose 2 airports fairly close together, and practice with that. Set up a 'VOR to VOR" flight plan so you have a waypoint or two, then follow the suggestions in the above posts.

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For the default 737, try the following: When you get within 25 miles of your destination airport, look on either the GPS panel or the map and determine the heading of the runway you wish to land on, if you click on the airport shown on the map, it will give you information about it, and you should note some of this down, the runway heading and the ILS frequency, these two bits of information will enable you to make an automated landing, using the ILS (Instrument Landing System) of the airport. So, having found out those two bits of info, you will need to set up your aeroplane to use them. Enter the runway heading in the course window on the mode control panel (the big autopilot panel, make sure it is the course window you are adjusting, not the heading window). Next, enter the ILS frequency into the NAV 1 and NAV 2 radios (they are down on the centre pedestal, but you can use the radio pop up window if you like, make sure it is the nav radios you are tuning in, not the Coms radios). Depending on what airport you are landing at, you should now have a heading set in the course window (for example 270) and an ILS frequency tuned in on both navigation radios (for example 109.9). Now you will need to fly your airliner into the range of the ILS beacons. You can see these depicted on the GPS with green cone-shaped 'feathers', and you should be aiming to fly into those about 15 miles out from the airport. Here's how you do that... Dial in an altitude of 3,000 feet on the autopilot, use level change and then altitude hold when at 3,000, and put your aircraft on a course that will fly you into that green ILS feather at no more than about 30 degrees off the runway heading and about 15 miles out from the airport, using the heading control on the autopilot (this is basically what ATC does when they give you steering information for an approach, but you can do all this yourself just to get used to it). Whilst you are flying up to those green feathers, turn on the VOR/LOC button on the autopilot panel (this will make your aeroplane turn onto the runway heading you set in the course window when you are in line with the runway, overriding the heading control). Get your speed down to about 200 knots with the autothrottle, and when it is at about 200 knots, drop the landing gear and a bit of flaps. You should be able to see the distance to the runway you have tuned in, it will be displayed in your primary flight display (the big artificial horizon screen). When you get about ten miles away from the runway, get your speed down to about 140 knots and gradually lower the flaps as you slow to that speed, note that the placard on the main panel near the landing gear switch which tells you the speeds at which you can lower more flaps. You will see a purple diamond on the right side of the primary flight display that will be moving slowly down the display screen, this indicates the glideslope beacon which will steer your aircraft down to the runway (you will be flying into this as it fans out up from the runway at an angle of about three degrees), when you see that purple diamond get right near the middle of the display, press the APP button on the autopilot panel and you will capture the glideslope. The autopilot will now override the altitude hold setting and you will be flying an automated approach. Strictly speaking, you should disengage the autopilot just as you get about 100 feet or so above the runway and make the last bit of the landing manually, but you will probably get away with letting FS fly uyou all the way down to the runway. This is a very basic version of what you should be doing, but it is enough to get you on the right track. Really, you should suss all this out in a simpler aircraft first, but that's up to you I guess. |all of this stuff is in the tutorials buiult into FS incidentally, so you should probably have a look at them. Al

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Hi I fixed the lining up problem by using the PROC button on the GPS, however i am having trouble going to NFFN. When I set up a flight from YSSY to NFFN, click PROC and press Select Approach, there are no approaches listed. Anyone know a fix?

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Hi I fixed the lining up problem by using the PROC button on the GPS, however i am having trouble going to NFFN. When I set up a flight from YSSY to NFFN, click PROC and press Select Approach, there are no approaches listed. Anyone know a fix?
Make sure you have RNY02 selected, thats the only one with an ILS

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Hi I fixed the lining up problem by using the PROC button on the GPS, however i am having trouble going to NFFN. When I set up a flight from YSSY to NFFN, click PROC and press Select Approach, there are no approaches listed. Anyone know a fix?
Not all airports have precision approaches therefore the runways will not be listed in the GPS. In this case, you would have to fly a visual approach.

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There is another problem with lining up with a runway. Navigraph has fixed it somewhat with their cycle updates but not completely. There is a known bug with FS9 and FSX regarding real world magnetic variations whereas, you put in the course heading for a runway and it will throw you off center by some degrees and you'll come in at an angle in certain instances. Ryan over at PMDG has a sticky about this problem with a link to a fix: http://forum.avsim.net/topic/336155-magnetic-variation-updates-for-fs9-and-fsx/ . I just found out about this from a friend and thought I would bring some attention to it even if it's not exactly the problem the OP was having. Best regards,Jim

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Make sure you have RNY02 selected, thats the only one with an ILS
How can I do this, there are no approaches at all.

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This is the problem im having after pressing PROC - Select Approach for NFFN. Where are my approaches???

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That doesnt look like the PROC options page, it should look like this..

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