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Airbusman

777 retirements

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When are the very first 777's (ones built in the early 90's) due for retirement? The A320 was launched in the 1980's but a few air frames are now hitting the bone yard due to cycles vs accidents from what I see.

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are you looking to build a home cockpit :smile:

I would love to have the front section of a T7 in my garage.

 

steve-0

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When are the very first 777's (ones built in the early 90's) due for retirement? The A320 was launched in the 1980's but a few air frames are now hitting the bone yard due to cycles vs accidents from what I see.

 

I think BA retired a couple, well I think some were sold back to Boeing then retired for parts. G-YMMM, the Aircraft that was involved in the BAW38 Incident in 2008, got written off and scrapped for parts.

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Or the engines and wings.

Or the pilots! :Just Kidding:

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Or the pilots!

 

I know you were only joking but I just want to note the following:

 

Not sure about the co-pilot, but the captain, Peter Burkill continued to fly for BA after the accident, took an early retirement-type package, but then was rehired by BA. Neither he nor his co-pilot were held in any way responsible for the accident, and Burkill was praised for retracting the flaps to 25, thereby extending the aircraft's glide so that it did not hit the approach lights.

 

Mike

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I know you were only joking but I just want to note the following:

 

Not sure about the co-pilot, but the captain, Peter Burkill continued to fly for BA after the accident, took an early retirement-type package, but then was rehired by BA. Neither he nor his co-pilot were held in any way responsible for the accident, and Burkill was praised for retracting the flaps to 25, thereby extending the aircraft's glide so that it did not hit the approach lights.

 

Mike

 

I BELIVE he is now flying on their 77W's....

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When are the very first 777's (ones built in the early 90's) due for retirement?

 

This already happened a few years ago. MSN 27109, 777-200A ex-BA G-ZZZE and Varig PP-VRD // MSN 26917, 777-200A ex-United N766UA and Air India VT-AIR. no big dents or scratches on either of them but the 777s are worth more as spare parts than as an airplane.

 

Source: http://www.pprune.or...tml#post3015906

 

There seams to be a lot of miss information around, so here goes.

The 777 is the first aircraft certified that uses composites for the floor beams.

As such the intial certification was EXTREMELY conservative. I am not sure of the exact number but something like the first 35-40 were certified under this restricted total life. The aircraft in question can be relifed but it is very expensive and involves the complete removeal and replacement of the floor beams. (May also apply to other structural members).

I am, not sure if it is ahrs or cycles limit.

As the production run was going on, and with more evidence as to the lasting qualities of the structures in place and prob some mods, the life of the aircraft was extended.

You will find that this only applies to the 200's, the 200 er's are not affected as they came out later. They do have life limits, just a lot greater.

EK have 3 aircraft approaching the same limit, they are looking seriously at a relife because we need the seats. However, we would be the first and that is always risky. A frieghter conversion was also talked about because you have the floor out anyway.

The 777 will be around for a long time, guess you could look at these first ones to go as sacrifices to the new technology

 

Watch out for gravity, ultimately it WILL take control

 

It's a bit like the new 787 Dreamliners, the first 59 of which requires extensive rework at Everett.

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I BELIVE he is now flying on their 77W's....

 

He isn't just flying the 77W. All BA Pilots that are on the 777 Fleet fly both 772 & 77W.

 

Correct he did indeed take a break from Flying but then came back a couple of Years later, I believe all crew is still at BA and on the 777. The guys on the Flight Deck were far from blamed, their actions and professionalism on that day saved a ton of lives.

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I know you were only joking but I just want to note the following:

 

Not sure about the co-pilot, but the captain, Peter Burkill continued to fly for BA after the accident, took an early retirement-type package, but then was rehired by BA. Neither he nor his co-pilot were held in any way responsible for the accident, and Burkill was praised for retracting the flaps to 25, thereby extending the aircraft's glide so that it did not hit the approach lights.

 

Mike

He isn't just flying the 77W. All BA Pilots that are on the 777 Fleet fly both 772 & 77W.

 

Correct he did indeed take a break from Flying but then came back a couple of Years later, I believe all crew is still at BA and on the 777. The guys on the Flight Deck were far from blamed, their actions and professionalism on that day saved a ton of lives.

 

Peter Burkhill was treated atrociously by British Airways. He was blamed for the accident in the media by 'freezing' at the controls, he then left BA and searched for other jobs but couldn't get hired because he had 'aircraft incident' on his records. When he returned to BA he was confronted with Cabin staff who asked him mid-flight, did you freeze at the controls? So much for a welcome return to know your own cabin staff don't trust your flying abilities.

 

 

Alex

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Which is a real shame since the FO was the PF and Burkhill praised FO Coward for his professionalism and expertise during the emergency.

 

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... When he returned to BA he was confronted with Cabin staff who asked him mid-flight, did you freeze at the controls? So much for a welcome return to know your own cabin staff don't trust your flying abilities.

 

Alex

 

I know this happened after the accident but before he left BA. Completely false rumors circulated among cabin crew members to this effect. It was a factor in his decision to leave. But I haven't heard that these rumors circulated after he went back to BA.

 

Burkill was commended for not taking control of the aircraft since he had a perfectly capable first officer flying the plane. He was also commended for taking the decision to decrease flaps that prolonged the glide and averted a much worse crash. He really belongs up there with Sully Sullenberger as someone who dealt very successfully with a situation for which pilots are not trained and who made the right call in an extreme situation. Indeed he had much less time to figure out what to do.

 

Mike

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I know this happened after the accident but before he left BA. Completely false rumors circulated among cabin crew members to this effect. It was a factor in his decision to leave. But I haven't heard that these rumors circulated after he went back to BA.

 

Burkill was commended for not taking control of the aircraft since he had a perfectly capable first officer flying the plane. He was also commended for taking the decision to decrease flaps that prolonged the glide and averted a much worse crash. He really belongs up there with Sully Sullenberger as someone who dealt very successfully with a situation for which pilots are not trained and who made the right call in an extreme situation. Indeed he had much less time to figure out what to do.

 

Mike

 

I would reccommend reading his autobiography, it is fantastic.

 

When he returned to BA after the crash, on a flight to Antiuga I believe, he was approached by senior cabin crew in flight and questioned.

 

Alex

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I would love to have the front section of a T7 in my garage.

 

protip: You'll be better off getting a 767 cockpit. More or less the same thing... and easier to get.

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protip: You'll be better off getting a 767 cockpit. More or less the same thing... and easier to get.

 

Less :biggrin:

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Less

 

Well it would be if you intended to get it complete, screens and all... but who would sell you that. Under that, basic shape is the same.

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can you imagine my missus face if she opened the door to get the lawn mower out

and found a T7 in the garage.Talking%20Ear%20Off.gifTalking%20Ear%20Off.gifTalking%20Ear%20Off.gif

 

steve-0

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Keep in mind too that the pressurization cycle count on a long-haul jet is often MUCH lower than that of a 737 or A320. A short/medium range jet will do a bunch of them in one day while a long range jet often does just one a day or so. There are still perfectly good 747-100s, DC-10s etc flying today and a lot of it is because of that.

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protip: You'll be better off getting a 767 cockpit. More or less the same thing... and easier to get.

 

If it's the 767-400ER cockpit then it is the same thing!

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Or you could build one from scratch if your good with tools and metal working.

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Andy, I just found this video on Youtube. About 3:37 you can hear an announcement that Burkill is the captain.

[media=]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r8cNbIP1KY[/media]

 

Mike

 

thats where i found the infomation :Loser:

 

He isn't just flying the 77W. All BA Pilots that are on the 777 Fleet fly both 772 & 77W.

 

Correct he did indeed take a break from Flying but then came back a couple of Years later, I believe all crew is still at BA and on the 777. The guys on the Flight Deck were far from blamed, their actions and professionalism on that day saved a ton of lives.

well that just makes me want to be a BA pilot in a few years even more...

thanks for that info, never knew that....

 

I would reccommend reading his autobiography, it is fantastic.

 

When he returned to BA after the crash, on a flight to Antiuga I believe, he was approached by senior cabin crew in flight and questioned.

 

Alex

he has an autobiography? i never knew this, can you lead me on to some more infomation in it, or tell me the Title....?

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