AviatorMan

Historic DC-6 timetables

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For those interested in flying actual routes flown by DC-6's see the following link:

http://www.timetableimages.com/ttimages/complete/complete.htm#USA

As I am generally not interested in flight simulation to fly very long haul flights, I have been interested to search out the shorter and mid-range routes. For example, American Airlines had a number of multi-stop DC-6 flights in the northeast (Washington - New York - Boston) and the midwest (New York - to Chicago). Western Airlines (for which we do not seem to have a livery) had a number of  mid-range flights on the West Coast (San Diego - Palm Springs - Ontario - Long Beach - LA - Burbank - Oakland - SF - Portland - Seattle). I find these latter flights especially satisfying as they are over the Orbx excellent Southern/Northern California and Pacific Northwest regions.

 

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I don't know if you're interested, but I flew on a WAL DC-6B LAX-LAS-LAX; circa 1970. In 1971, USAF C118 LETO (Torrejon AB, Madrid Spain) to EGUN (Mildenhall AB, UK). 

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Wow! Thanks for getting these! I was actually looking for some old Delta and American timetables!

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6 hours ago, LDP1949 said:

I don't know if you're interested, but I flew on a WAL DC-6B LAX-LAS-LAX; circa 1970. In 1971, USAF C118 LETO (Torrejon AB, Madrid Spain) to EGUN (Mildenhall AB, UK). 

Hi LDP!

What do you think as far as the realism of the DC-6? What would be a normal altitude for your LAX-LAS routes?

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12000-16000 sounds reasonable; somewhere in that range. Some years later in my Vegas days between LA and LAS with WAL B737s, the trip would be ~45 mins, wheels-up to touchdown. So, about one hour and change would be common for the -6. As I remember even back in the early 1970s, the pistons were very much in the phase-out phase with fewer and fewer segments in favor of cutting-edge DC-9s, B727s and B737s. My favorite during this period was the Lockheed Electra. 

As far as the realism for the PMDG DC-6; I don't know, I'm strictly a GA guy these days after 30 years in the airlines and ATC in the real world. 

Be well / Les Parson

 

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I'm a major air carrier jet guy.  My total radial engine experience is a little Stearman time and 45 hours in the T-28, courtesy of the USN.  By my reckoning, PMDG has done an amazing job putting this model together.  Systems, power settings, performance and damage modelling is probably the best out there.  The A2A B377 is in the same class.

Both airplanes are a remarkable testament to operating the real world airplanes.  Don Douglas designed his airplanes for two pilots.  I am very comfortable running the DC-6 without the FE.  All the controls are right in front of you.  OTOH, I rarely fly the B377 without the FE running everything on the panel because Boeing designed as a 3 man cockpit from the git go. 

Both sim models are outstanding, but for pure fun, i would have to give the nod to the Cloudmaster.  Thanks PMDG!

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54 minutes ago, jimmyfingers said:

I'm a major air carrier jet guy.  My total radial engine experience is a little Stearman time and 45 hours in the T-28, courtesy of the USN.  By my reckoning, PMDG has done an amazing job putting this model together.  Systems, power settings, performance and damage modelling is probably the best out there.  The A2A B377 is in the same class.

Both airplanes are a remarkable testament to operating the real world airplanes.  Don Douglas designed his airplanes for two pilots.  I am very comfortable running the DC-6 without the FE.  All the controls are right in front of you.  OTOH, I rarely fly the B377 without the FE running everything on the panel because Boeing designed as a 3 man cockpit from the git go. 

Both sim models are outstanding, but for pure fun, i would have to give the nod to the Cloudmaster.  Thanks PMDG!

Couldn't agree with you more! I'm having LOTS of fun flying it! 

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1 hour ago, jimmyfingers said:

I'm a major air carrier jet guy.  My total radial engine experience is a little Stearman time and 45 hours in the T-28, courtesy of the USN.  By my reckoning, PMDG has done an amazing job putting this model together.  Systems, power settings, performance and damage modelling is probably the best out there.  The A2A B377 is in the same class.

Both airplanes are a remarkable testament to operating the real world airplanes.  Don Douglas designed his airplanes for two pilots.  I am very comfortable running the DC-6 without the FE.  All the controls are right in front of you.  OTOH, I rarely fly the B377 without the FE running everything on the panel because Boeing designed as a 3 man cockpit from the git go. 

Both sim models are outstanding, but for pure fun, i would have to give the nod to the Cloudmaster.  Thanks PMDG!

Thanks for the very helpful comments. When I first started with the PMDG DC-6, after a bit of studying of the documentation, I still found the operation quite complex, so I flew with the aid of the FE. I would study what he did each time, especially during the pre-take off and takeoff, which helped me to learn the procedure. Now I can handle a dry takeoff without the FE. And once you have survived the takeoff without the engines over-heating and getting damaged, the climb and cruise phases are not too difficult. But I think there is still a lot to learn as far as monitoring engine temperatures and other indicators.

I may still buy the A2A Connie, but I prefer having the FE controls in front of the pilots as the DC-6 has instead of having to turn to the side to view the FE's panel as the Constellation has.

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For those interested in flying actual routes flown by DC-6's see the following link:

www.flyingtigersgroup.org

The have a great database with not only modern virtual airlines but also historic routes to fly. Also a lot of DC-6 routes.

The 1954 KLM route will be added soon.

 

Also some modern Everts routes are in their database with flight schedules

regards Ronald van Ingen

 

 

 

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On 25/09/2017 at 6:38 PM, AviatorMan said:

For those interested in flying actual routes flown by DC-6's see the following link:

http://www.timetableimages.com/ttimages/complete/complete.htm#USA

 

That's a very useful source which I discovered after acquiring the A2A Constellation some time ago and I now use it to help plan almost all my classic piston airliner flights.

Bill

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On 01/10/2017 at 6:09 PM, RonnieDuck said:

For those interested in flying actual routes flown by DC-6's see the following link:

www.flyingtigersgroup.org

The have a great database with not only modern virtual airlines but also historic routes to fly. Also a lot of DC-6 routes.

The 1954 KLM route will be added soon.

 

Also some modern Everts routes are in their database with flight schedules

regards Ronald van Ingen

 

 

 

Hello guys !

As an FTG manager, I am happy to see that Ronnie has pointed out our classic database. All our schedules are all complete and come from a good collection of real schedules bought on ebay or other sources over the years.

Our current DC-6 schedules include :

Aerolineas Argentinas
Alitalia
ALM (Antillean Airlines)
Austral
Cathay Pacific
Continental Airlines
Delta Airlines
Everts Air Cargo
Flying Tigers Line
Hawaiian Airlines
Japan Air Lines
Pan Am
Saudia Arabian
Swiss Air
Thai Airways
Trans Australian Airlines
United Airlines

Our current Constellation schedules include :

Air Canada
Air France
BOAC
Iberia
Lufthansa
Pan Am
Qantas
South African Airways
TWA

The choice is pretty wide and the database is constantly updated depending on our finds, and of course there are many, many others to be found.

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